A Feast for Crows Update

One for the George R.R. Martin fans…

A report from the Boskone convention (see entry #57), which GRRM attended, says that A Feast for Crows is still not complete but will be soon. The book will be about 1300 pages long when completed and will most likely be available in the UK first. The book has 19 point-of-view characters (the earlier books had 8, 9 and 10 respectively). There are many more details about the books in the link so fans will want to check it out.

I have yet to read any of the 3 books in the Song of Ice & Fire series but several friends have raved about it and I am anxious to get to it. But 1300 pages…Wow!

A previous post on bloated fantasy mentioned GRRM one of the violators. He is the one author who, until the bloated fantasy article, I never heard associated with bloated fantasy. (Solar Flare agrees.) What surprises me is that these books have not become the target of booksplitting.

[Link to The Citadel, the archive of A Song of Ice and Fire lore, via Professor Bainbridge]

3 thoughts on “A Feast for Crows Update”

  1. Robert Jordan – repetitive, boring, bloated works.

    David Eddings – same

    LE Modesett Jr – same, even to the point of cut/pasting paragraphs from previous works!

    Philip Jose Farmer – similar, but at least more interesting

    Jack Chalker – not bloated, but equally repetitive (in his SF too)

    JRR Tolkien – are you kidding me? Long does not equal bloated. Yes the series is long, but it’s not repetitive or dull like the previous.

    George R R Martin – It is totally unfair to include his works in this category. The writing is sound, it is not repetitive in any way, and the writing style is closer to Gene Wolfe than Piers Anthony.

    As for booksplitting – as Stephen King has noted, once you establish a track record you get to decide what happens instead of the publisher.

  2. I think that GRRM started off sort-of rehabilitating “fat fantasy” as a genre, but now he is in serious danger of succumbing to bloat. AFfC better be awfully good, at 1300 pages.

    And I wouldn’t categorize JRRT as “bloated fantasy”, either. Some stories need that heft, and his was one of them.

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