Isaac Asimov’s Probe

Speaking of Isaac Asimov’s Probe (HEL-lo!), wouldn’t you know you can watch the 2-hour premiere episode of Probe on YouTube? (We love you YouTube!) It has been uploaded in 5-minute pieces. Start with part 1 and follow the “related” links for the other parts.

What is Probe, you say? From the Asimov FAQ:

Asimov was credited as adviser and co-creator of this television series, which lasted for a 2-hour pilot and six 1-hour episodes on ABC in 1988 before a writer’s strike came along and ended the series. It starred Parker Stevenson as brilliant young scientist Austin James, who owned his own high-tech think tank consulting firm, and used his scientific expertise to solve baffling crimes as a sort of modern day Sherlock Holmes.

5 thoughts on “Isaac Asimov’s Probe”

  1. It was a darn good show. But, probably too intelligent/highbrow for the tube. If the writer’s strike hadn’t come along, it probably would have been killed off anyway.

    I guess the closest thing we’ve got to it now is the CBS show “Numb3rs”. I’m amazed that it has made it to a third season and that the one nerdy star is being billed as “hunky”. I guess geeks have taken over the world!

    :O

    (Of course, when it comes to television, one must not forget that Asimov floated the Lucky Starr books for television, hence the use of the nom de plume Paul French. And don’t forget that he consulted for the original Battlestar Galactica. Too bad they apparently did not listen to him and we ended up with Galactica 1980!)

  2. I’d like to see this show released on DVD as well.

    Actually, more than that. I’d like to go back in time and settle the writers’ strike so we end up with more than a handful of episodes…

  3. Of course, I remember Probe! I watched it faithfully. I used to have every episode (not that there were so many it was hard) on tape. And I worn those tapes out.

    This would be a quick and easy automatic DVD purchase for me.

  4. As a 30+ year member of the Writer’s Guild, we’re used to getting blamed for all kinds of things far beyond our control (read: braindead media Execs and the fact that too many people like actors, techs, etc., have a say in what gets done).

    There were shooting scripts for more episodes which could indeed have been filmed.

    Why weren’t they? I wish I knew, but we are not privy to all information, especially decisions made by nameless, faceless people behind closed doors.

    Put out an overpriced DVD? I’ll but it!

    Same for The Secret Adventures of Jules Verne.

     

    Ouzicat

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