The New York Times has a profile on Goro Miyazaki, the son of the anime master Hayao Miyazaki, and his upcoming film Tales From Earthsea which based on Ursula K. LeGuin’s books. LeGuin is quoted in the artcile, giving her thoughts on the new adaptation:

As a teenager Mr. Miyazaki read the “Earthsea” books, and he originally planned to make a faithful interpretation. “But as I continued on the project, I realized that adapting the story exactly was not really what I should do,” he said. “In order for me to speak to younger audiences, some changes had to be made because of the gap between when the book was written and when I made the film. I feel that metropolitan culture is becoming a dead end and there’s nowhere to go. I can’t just shout, ‘Return to nature,’ but we need to rethink how we can live in cities yet remain close to nature.”

Ms. Le Guin offered a balanced response, saying: “I thought the moral lectures in the film were spoken eloquently. In fact they were often quoted pretty directly from the books. But I didn’t see how the action of the film justified them. They felt pasted on to me. I did not understand why Arren stabs his father, nor how and why he earned redemption.”

She added: “I very much liked the scenes of plowing, drawing water, stabling the animals and so on, which give the film an earthy and practical calmness, a wise change of pace from constant conflict and action. In them, at least, I recognized my Earthsea.”

[via Locus Online]

Filed under: Movies

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