9 Other Questions about the Star Trek Universe Popular Science Should Answer

[via /Film]

The mathematicians over at Popular Science have determined that the 8 year-old James T. Kirk would have to had exerted a force of nearly 900 pounds with his fingers to stop from being flung over the precipice as seen in the trailer for J.J. Abrams’s Star Trek reboot. (Actually, this is why the chicks dig him.)

While they are contemplating Star Trek, I thought I’d invite them to answer some other questions I have. So…here are:

9 Questions about the Star Trek universe I’d Like Popular Science To Answer

  1. What is the coefficient of elasticity in Ricardo Montalban’s fake chest in Star Trek II?
  2. What were the chances that Kirk would have been hit with an asteroid in Star Trek V when he was singing “Row Your Boat”? How about a falling rock? How about if Spock and McCoy threw the rocks?
  3. What was a Red Shirt’s chances of survival on the Enterprise?
  4. How much would it cost to erase the vocals from every existing copy of the Enterprise theme song ever recorded?
  5. In Star Trek II, how loud would Kirk have to scream “Khaaan!” for his voice to travel around the newly formed planet?
  6. How much energy would be required to move Deep Space Nine around so they could actually explore something once in a while?
  7. In Star Trek IV, is the Enterprise physically capable of carrying whales *and* Scotty?
  8. Same as previous question, but now add Riker.
  9. Can you invent something that filters out the Dawson’s Creek from J.J. Abrams’s Star Trek reboot ?

5 thoughts on “9 Other Questions about the Star Trek Universe Popular Science Should Answer”

  1. Fat jokes?

    Really — that’s the best you could come up with?

    Twice?

    In space there is no gravity, unless you’re in orbit of a planet, star, or dangerously close to a black hole.

  2. Yes, the Enterprise theme song made my ears bleed, but DS9 solved that “problem” with the USS Defiant.

    Sisko pwns the Gamma Quadrant!

  3. The Enterprise has gravity. Otherwise everyone would be floating around while trying to operate the ship.  So I suppose the weight of the whales could be an issue if the ship couldn’t handle it– though I suppose artificial gravity could be tweaked to accommodate anything.   I mean, if we’re being technical and not just joking around like I thought we were.

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