Sheila Williams Sets the Record Straight

A few weeks back, Jeff VanderMeer and Jeremy Tolbert appeared on an episode on The Sofanauts in which they had some harsh words for the short fiction magazines, including Asimov’s.

This week, The Sofanauts hosted a fascinating follow-on discussion centered on Asimov’s. Guests included Asimov’s Editor Sheila Williams and Managing Editor Brian Bieniowski. Writers, Jeff VanderMeer and Jeremy Tolbert also re-joined host Tony C. Smith to revisit the issue.

Contrary to growing opinion in the SF community, things are not all doom and gloom for the magazine. Digital sales are up and new methods of delivery are being explored. Yet some things, like website and digital submissions continue to be touchy subjects.

Don’t miss this frank and engaging roundtable focusing on one of the most established magazines in SF!

6 thoughts on “Sheila Williams Sets the Record Straight”

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  2. I feel that Juan Carlos has made every salient point I would have discussed, and I agree with him wholeheartedly. 

     

  3. This would be the greatest SF podcast ever, if Tony Smith did a better job on the audio.  Hopefully it will improve in future episodes.

  4. As a longtime reader of Asimov’s, I think it must be said, and repeated whenever the subject comes up, that whatever quibbles anyone has about the way the magazine is running, the content has always been top notch. Asimov’s has fantastic stories inside the pages.

    Personally, I wish those pages were more aesthetically appealing. I think the magazine could appeal to a much larger base if the form of the magazine was as high-quality as the content. This quibble has never impacted my decision to pick up a copy at the local bookstore.

    (Which I will be doing in about twenty minutes…)

  5. Actually, I’d disagree, J.M.  I feel that the content has slid into the crapper since the Dozois Era ended.  After sticking with the mag for an additional two years, I let my subscription lapse. 

    The magazine simply fails to publish anything which generates any interest in me anymore.  Why throw money down a hole? 

    My point?  One that I have made before.  I’m not a solitary example in this regard concerning Asimov’s.  I think the only way that might change is if Asimov’s got a new editor but I suspect the replacement will probably be as bad, if not worse. 

     

    S. F. Murphy

     

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