The SF Signal Podcast (Episode 096): Sword & Sorcery Panel, Part 1

In episode 96 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester offers up part one in a special three-part podcast on Sword and Sorcery moderated by editor, author and publicist Jaym Gates.


This week’s panel:

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15 thoughts on “The SF Signal Podcast (Episode 096): Sword & Sorcery Panel, Part 1”

  1. @Paul

    BWA-HA-HA.

    @Aldo

    So glad you like it! :)

    @James

    Thanks so much!

    In what way is the download broken?  I was able to DL it straight from the link with no issues.

    ~P
    @atfmb

  2. Oh… It looks like our swords will get blunt in thi battle. I don’t think that to stick to a genre is a sight of lack of creativity; because each field is an universe with infinity possibilities for the imagination. And by the way… Do you consider the biblical story of Samson being a kind of example of Sword and Sorcery in another context? We only have to change the donkey’s jawbone for a sword, and… Eureka!

    Beside… It’s got sorcery.

  3. First time I listened to a podcast. what a great discussion! wonderful thoughts nibbling at my mind. especially when one person mentioned about being tired of destined ones. so am i!! looking forward to part 2 :)

  4. Amazing discussion!

    (Can’t always tell who is doing the talking. Handy if the moderator could do that sotto voice thing as people talk.)

  5. I note some of the authors mention Eddings/Feist over the course of the interview, and I think it was Jaym who mentioned Gemmell. As someone who started reading all these authors when I started high school in 1984, I’d be keen to hear an interview podcast about what current authors think about the abovementioned authors, from what I consider the golden age of fantasy novels in the 1980s. I mean, take Gemmell – a real titan of the genre, who only a few years after his death feels almost forgotten. Same with Feist (happily alive) and Eddings (not so happily dead).

    Anyway, just a thought.

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