WINNERS: 2012 Nebula Awards (Plus: Ray Bradbury Award and Andre Norton Award)

The winners of the 2012 Nebula Awards have just been announced!

  • NOVEL: 2312, Kim Stanley Robinson (Orbit US; Orbit UK) [Our review]
  • NOVELLA: After the Fall, Before the Fall, During the Fall by Nancy Kress (Tachyon)
  • NOVELETTE: “Close Encounters”, Andy Duncan (The Pottawatomie Giant & Other Stories)
  • SHORT STORY: “Immersion“, Aliette de Bodard (Clarkesworld 6/12)
  • RAY BRADBURY AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING DRAMATIC PRESENTATION: Beasts of the Southern Wild, Benh Zeitlin (director), Lucy Alibar and Benh Zeitlin (writers), (Journeyman/Cinereach/Court 13/Fox Searchlight)
  • ANDRE NORTON AWARD FOR YOUNG ADULT SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY: Fair Coin, E.C. Myers (Pyr)
  • 2011 DAMON KNIGHT GRAND MASTER AWARD: Gene Wolfe
  • SOLSTICE AWARD: Carl Sagan and Ginjer Buchanan
  • KEVIN O’DONNELL JR. SERVICE TO SFWA AWARD: Michael H. Payne

Congrats to all!

4 thoughts on “WINNERS: 2012 Nebula Awards (Plus: Ray Bradbury Award and Andre Norton Award)”

  1. I’m rather stunned that such an unlikable novel won the top honor. With it’s clunky prose and annoying characters. Giving the Nebula to such a horrid novel will only harm SF as a genre. People who might not other wise pick up a SF novel, just might buy a copy of this if only because it’s won the Nebula. It’s going to put most general readers (and some SF fans) off of reading SF novels altogether.

    1. I actually liked 2312, but I did find some of it clunky as well (particularly the extracts and lists that were inserted between chapters). I loved the ingenuity of Mercury’s habitat and the asteroid travel. I liked Swan and Wahram well enough as characters too.

      It’s probably not the best novel for newcomers to the genre. Actually, it’s not the best introduction to Robinson — I suppose the Mars trilogy is best read first — but I have no issue with it winning. It has more appeal for hard SF fans than the more popular space opera style of science fiction.

  2. Not my favorite novel of the year nor Robinsons best, but it was not a strong list except for The Drowning Girl which was much better but more of a dark fantasy novel which may have turned off some of the voters. Personally I thought the best sf/f novel of the year was The Rise of Ransom City which didn’t make anybodys lists.

  3. Give Robinson credit for knowing his SFWA audience and what they like – a prolix meandering travelogue about the interior life of a transgendered radical artist. It’s got lots of imagination and invention but the plot and pacing are lousy. I guess I should be thankful a hard SF book could win against all the werewolves, fairies and goddesses that rule the field.

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