Archive for June, 2013

WINNERS: 2013 Locus Awards

The winners for the 2013 Locus Award have been announced!
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Sunday Cinema: Dr. Easy

From the Vimeo description: “Michael is a broken man with a gun. He is surrounded by armed police. A robot with medical training is dispatched to negotiate – but can it save him?”

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Jess Haines writes about furred and fanged things that go bump in the night. Best known for the H&W Investigations urban fantasy series, she’s been writing since she was a teenager and was first published in 2010. Her latest release is Forsaken by the Others (Kensington/Zebra; July 2, 2013). Visit her at JessHaines.com for the latest news and updates. Jess can also be found on Twitter as @Jess_Haines, on her blog, Goodreads, and Facebook.

Don’t forget to check out her other tour stops and enter her US giveaway or her International giveaway!

Jess was kind enough to talk about her latest book, Forsaken by the Others, and more!


Kristin Centorcelli: Jess, will you tell us a little about yourself and your background? Have you always wanted to be a writer?
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Carrie Cuinn has posted the table of contents for her new collection Women and Other Constructs:

Says Carrie:

I’ve put together my first short fiction collection. It’s called Women and Other Constructs. There are six previously published tales, plus two new ones, and just for fun, a sonnet about a murderous robot. The “Introduction” talks about the broader themes behind the book, and “About the Stories” gives a quick look at what inspired each of them

Here’s the table of contents…
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Here’s the cover art and synopsis of the upcoming novel Once Upon a Time in Hell by Guy Adams, sequeul to the weird western The Good the Bad and the Infernal.

Here’s the synopsis:
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Check out this excellent find by Brian Ruckley

It’s a short film called The Centrifuge Brain Project and it has footage from “The Institute for Cntrifugal Research” of the wildest amusement park rides you could possibly imagine…

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SF/F/H Link Post for 2013-06-29

Interviews & Profiles

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WINNERS: Ice Forged by Gail Z. Martin

The winner of our giveaway for Ice Forged by Gail Z. Martin has been chosen and notified.

Congratulations to:

  • John D. (US)
  • Leland E. (US)
  • Milo M. (England)

You will be receiving your prize soon!

Thanks to everyone who entered.

REVIEW SUMMARY: This week’s short fiction selection encompasses the fiction and nonfiction in the June 2013 issue of Apex Magazine.

MY RATING:

BRIEF SYNOPSIS: The universe-altering power of love’s first kiss; the inescapable seduction of story; the tempting sweetness of the loss of control; the implacable nature of youth exposed to war…this issue of Apex Magazine eschews the darker end of the dark fantasy spectrum to present four richly diverse short stories and an insightful nonfiction article on religion and geekdom.
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Amazon had the cover art and synopsis of the upcoming novel Ascension, a Tangled Axon novel by Jacqueline Koyanagi.

Here’s the synopsis:
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Friday YouTube: Every Time Spock Says “Fascinating”

Spock may use the word “fascinating” to indicate something that’s unexpected, but this video properly reflects the Merriam-Webster definition of the word: captivating…
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Free SF, Fantasy and Horror Fiction for 6/28/2013

Want these delicious links emailed to you once a week? Sign up for the Free SF/F/H Fiction Newsletter

What’s special about today’s free fiction?

  1. Beneath Ceaseless Skies #124 – June 27, 2013
  2. Enchanted Conversation has a story from Andrea Mullaney
  3. Nature has a short short story from Euan Nisbet

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SF/F/H Link Post for 2013-06-28

Interviews & Profiles

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Samuel Sattin is a graduate of the Mills College MFA in creative writing and the recipient of NYS and SLS Fellowships. His work has appeared in Salon Magazine, io9, Kotaku, The Good Men Project, and Heeb Magazine,and been featured in the The New Yorker, amongst others. He is currently a Contributing Editor at The Weeklings, and lives in Oakland, California, with his wife, beagle, and tuxedo cat. League of Somebodies is his first novel.

Samuel was kind enough to answer some questions I had after reading his debut novel, League of Somebodies.
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Flash Gordon: Zeitgeist

On the Kirkus Blog this week, I take a look at Flash Gordon: Zeitgeist, a graphic novel from Dynamite that captures the heyday of pulp in 200 pages.

From the post:

One of the most enduring pulp characters from the 1930’s, Flash Gordon has stayed in the public consciousness through daily strips – translated into many different languages – radio and film serials, multiple cartoons and live-action television shows, novels, comics, and a cult-classic movie.  Alex Raymond’s original Sunday comic strip ran from 1934-1943, with other artists taking the reins all the way through 2003.  For most people, the 1980’s movie, starring Sam J. Jones as the title character, Melody Anderson as Dale Arden, Topol as Doctor Hans Zarkov, Max von Sydow as Ming, Timothy Dalton as Prince Barin, Brian Blessed as Vultan, and Ornella Muti as Princess Aura, comes to mind when you mention Flash Gordon.  But a lot of comic books starring the character have been produced from publishers small and large, including King Comics, Gold Key, Charlton, Marvel, Dark Horse, Ardden Entertainment, and DC – who produced one of my favorite incarnations in the late 80’s.  Now, Dynamite has brought the character full circle with Flash Gordon: Zeitgeist (978-1606903339), a throwback to the heady days when pulp was king, and characters were large than life.

Click over to the Kirkus Blog to read the rest of the piece.


“Utopia is that which is in contradiction with reality.”  – Albert Camus

“There is no way I can avoid thinking about the kind of world I belong to. The abuse of utopias disfigures everything.” – Floriano Martins

(Note: this is an edited excerpt from a longer discussion of the book that I hope to publish later. I’ll be discussing this book at Readercon 24’s Recent Fiction Book Club panel; the schedule is up at my blog. Also, some SPOILERS ahead for the book)

There are many things that I love about reading a novel, and one of them is when my expectations are inverted, tossed about, and I gain not just a new perspective on the narrative, but on my own thoughts. Robert Jackson Bennett’s latest novel American Elsewhere does that, but does not accomplish a singular objective so much as give the reader’s imagination a rich, sometimes messy terrain to explore. It is an SF novel, a horror novel, a broadside against Great American Novels, and an exceptional reading experience that became, to me, a meditation on and satire of the notion of utopia.
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After great reviews and award-winning festival run – culminating with Lincoln Center prestigious Indie Night Series on June 4, Radio Free Albemuth is Kickstarting its theatrical release.

Just like Blade Runner, Minority Report, A Scanner Darkly, and Adjustment Bureau…to name a few…Radio Free Albemuth is based on a Philip K. Dick novel. Radio Free Albemuth has been embraced by PKD fans and scholars and hailed as the best adaptation of PKD’s works to film yet by the likes of London SciFi International Film Festival.

Kickstarter perks include Associate Producer and Co-Executive Producer credits as well as digital downloads, DVDs and more.

In November, Blue Shift Magazine will run a full version of an interview with writer/directorJohn Alan Simon, but SF Signal has obtained this exclusive preview.


The film Radio Free Albemuth is based on a Philip K. Dick book. How’d you come to be involved with the project and what’s your role?

John Alan Simon: Critical opinions differ but I’ve always considered Radio Free Albemuth as an absolutely pivotal work.  That’s part of the reason I chose it.  This was Philip K. Dick’s first fictional attempt to tackle the mysterious VALIS experience that would haunt him the rest of his life.
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Hollywood Reporter says that not only will there be an adaptation of Ransom Riggs’ debut novel Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, but that it will also be directed by Tim Burton, have a script written by the scribe of X-Men: First Class, Jane Goldman, and will hit theaters July 31, 2015. They describe the story as one that “follows a teenage boy who is transported to an island where he must help protect a group of orphans with special powers from creatures out to destroy them.”

Compare and contrast with the book synopsis:
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A Brief History of the Dystopian Novel

Science Fiction has always had an interesting relationship with politics, and with the Snowden Affair brewing in the news, it seemed like a good time to look at one strain of political SF: the Dystopian Novel. It’s certainly relevant: sales of George Orwell’s landmark novel 1984 has been selling in enormous quantities in the last couple of weeks!

Go read A Brief History of the Dystopian Novey over on the Kirkus Reviews Blog.

Relatively speaking, I’m a Warhammer 40K newbie…so I consider this video detailing the history of the Warhammer 40K universe to be inclredibly useful stuff.

In fact, The Vaults of Terra YouTube channel is stuffed with cool Warhammer 40K vids like what follows after the jump….

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