TOC: “The Time Traveler’s Almanac” Edited by Ann VanderMeer and Jeff VanderMeer (Plus: US and UK Covers!)

Here’s the mouth-watering table of contents for Ann and Jeff VanderMeer’s upcoming massive time travel anthology The Time Traveler’s Almanac, coming out not soon enough…

But first, here’s the (updated) synopsis:

On the heels of the World Fantasy Award winning The Weird, the next genre-defining anthology from award-winning team Ann and Jeff VanderMeer explores the popular world of time travel fiction

The Time Traveler’s Almanac is the largest, most definitive collection of time travel stories ever assembled. Gathered into one volume by intrepid chrononauts and world-renowned anthologists Ann and Jeff VanderMeer, this almanac compiles more than a century’s worth of literary travels into the past and the future to reacquaint readers with beloved classics and introduce them to thrilling contemporary examples of the time travel genre.

Featuring over seventy journeys into time from Douglas Adams, Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, William Gibson, Ursula K. Le Guin, George R. R. Martin, Michael Moorcock, H. G. Wells, Connie Willis, Charles Yu, and many more, The Time Traveler’s Almanac covers millions of years of Earth’s history, from the age of the dinosaurs through to strange and fascinating futures.

In fact, The Time Traveler’s Almanac will serve as a time machine of its very own: the ultimate treasury of time travel stories, spanning the distance from the beginning of time to its very end.

In addition to collecting some of the best time travel fiction from over the past 100 years, the VanderMeers have commissioned original non-fiction, including an introduction by Rian Johnson, the writer and director of the recent Bruce Willis time travel movie Looper as well as an essay on the science of time travel by Stan Love, an astronaut from NASA. Other contributors are Charles Yu, Genevieve Valentine and Jason Heller.

Here’s the HUGE (alphabetical) table of contents:

FICTION

  1. “Young Zaphod Plays It Safe” by Douglas Adams
  2. “Terminós” by Dean Francis Alfar
  3. “What If?” by Issac Asimov
  4. “Noble Mold” by Kage Baker
  5. “A Night on the Barbary Coast” by Kage Baker
  6. “Life Trap” by Barrington J Bayley
  7. “This Tragic Glass” by Elizabeth Bear
  8. “Enoch Soames” by Max Beerbohn
  9. “The Most Important Thing in the World” by Steve Bein
  10. “In The Tube” by E.F. Benson
  11. “The Mask of the Rex” by Richard Bowes
  12. “A Sound of Thunder” by Ray Bradbury
  13. “Bad Timing” by Molly Brown
  14. “The Gulf of the Years” by George-Olivier Châteaureynaud
  15. “The Threads of Time” by C.J. Cherryh
  16. “Thirty Seconds From Now” by John Chu
  17. “Palindromic” by Peter Crowther
  18. “Domine” by Rjurik Davidson
  19. “The Lost Continent” by Greg Egan
  20. “The Gernsback Continuum” by William Gibson
  21. “3 RMS, Good View” by Karen Haber
  22. “Message in a Bottle” by Nalo Hopkinson
  23. “The Great Clock” by Langdon Jones
  24. “Hwang’s Billion Brilliant Daughters” by Alice Sola Kim
  25. “On the Watchtower at Plataea” by Garry Kilworth
  26. “Time Gypsies” by Ellen Klages
  27. “Vintage Seasons” by Henry Kuttner & C.L. Moore
  28. “At Dorado” by Geoffrey Landis
  29. “Ripples in the Dirac Sea” by Geoffrey Landis
  30. “The Final Days” by David Langford
  31. “Fish Night” by Joe Lansdale
  32. “As Time Goes By” by Tanith Lee
  33. “Another Story” by Ursula K. LeGuin
  34. “Loob” by Bob Leman
  35. “Alexia and Graham Bell” by Rosaleen Love
  36. “Traveller’s Rest” by David Masson
  37. “Death Ship” by Richard Matheson
  38. “Under Siege” by George R.R. Martin
  39. “The Clock That Went Backwards” by Edward Page Mitchell
  40. “Pale Rose” by Michael Moorcock
  41. “The House that Made the Sixteen Loops of Time” by Tamsyn Muir
  42. “Is There Anybody There?” by Kim Newman
  43. “Come-From-Aways” by Tony Pi
  44. “The Time Telephone” by Adam Roberts
  45. “Red Letter Day” by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
  46. “The Waitabits” by Eric Frank Russell
  47. “If Ever I Should Leave You” by Pamela Sargent
  48. “How the Future Got Better” by Eric Schaller
  49. “Needle in a Timestack” by Robert Silverberg
  50. “Delhi” by Vandana Singh
  51. “Himself in Anachron” by Cordwainer Smith
  52. “The Weed of Time” by Norman Spinrad
  53. “Palimpsest” by Charlie Stross
  54. “Yesterday Was Monday” by Theodore Sturgeon
  55. “Triceratops Summer” by Michael Swanwick
  56. “The Mouse Ran Down” by Adrian Tchaikovsky
  57. “Augusta Prima” by Karin Tidbeck
  58. “Twenty-One and Counting Up” by Harry Turtledove
  59. “Forty, Counting Down” by Harry Turtledove
  60. “Where or When” by Steve Utley
  61. “Swing Time” by Carrie Vaughn
  62. “(excerpt from) The Time Machine” by H.G. Wells
  63. “Fire Watch” by Connie Willis
  64. “Against the Lafayette Escadrille” by Gene Wolfe
  65. “The Lost Pilgrim” by Gene Wolfe

NON-FICTION

  1. Introduction by Rian Johnson
  2. Music for Time Travelers by Jason Heller
  3. The Science of Time Travel by Stan Love
  4. Trousseau, Fashion for Time Travelers by Genevieve Valentine
  5. Top Ten Tips for Time Travelers by Charles Yu

Book info as per Amazon US:

  • Hardcover: 800 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books (March 18, 2014)
  • ISBN-10: 0765374218
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765374219

Book info as per Amazon UK:

  • Hardcover: 800 pages
  • Publisher: Head of Zeus (7 Nov 2013)
  • ISBN-10: 1781853908
  • ISBN-13: 978-1781853900

7 thoughts on “TOC: “The Time Traveler’s Almanac” Edited by Ann VanderMeer and Jeff VanderMeer (Plus: US and UK Covers!)”

  1. Great anthology. The Vandermeer anthologies would make a nice nook in what I hope will one day be my library.

    I was expecting Ted Chiang to be in there. Maybe “The Merchant and the Alchemist’s Gate.”

    But we could play you missed that one all day…. I love how diverse it is in terms of era and genre.

  2. Is it possible that The Non-Fiction 1. entry instead should be Rian Johnson who wrote and directed Looper?

  3. I’m so excited! Love anthologies; love time travel.

    By the way, I headed over to the website of Head of Zeus, the British publisher, and downloaded their latest catalog.

    It shows a completely different cover for the book, corresponding to neither image you’ve posted. Possibly a hardcover/paperback difference?

  4. Love both covers!

    The US cover suggests an eye-watering 100 stories – was wondering how that could possibly be! The book is enormous enough as it is.

    I’m going to spend some time poring over the TOC, savoring the prospect. I’ve read some, of course, and I’m happy to see my favorite story included, as well as several others I loved.

    Lovely to see you here, Ann – thanks for the book, and thanks for responding.

    (P.S. – “Ripples in the Dirac Sea”, by Geoffrey A. Landis, if anyone wants to know.)

  5. The 100 stories thing was before the contents were chosen–Ann did most of the work on this one and she wound up taking a lot of longer stories, which makes sense since we had the room. Thus, the story count went down.

Comments are closed.