SHORT FILM: R.U.R.: Genesis

Czech writer Karel Čapek’s 1919 Play R.U.R. — which is about a hostile worker robot rebellion in the future year 1969 that leads to the extinction of the human race — is known for both its introduction of the word “robot” (R.U.R. was translated into English as “Rossum’s Universal Robots”) and also as insightful commentary into social class structure. R.U.R. is often cited as the influence for many science fiction novels that include robots.

More directly, it inspired filmmaker James Kerwin to make the film R.U.R.: Genesis, set in Čapek’s alt-history 1969, complete with ’60s styles and go-go dancers. Groovy, man.

The following serves as both a standalone short film and as a teaser for the forthcoming fill-length feature film.

[via Geek Magazine]

2 thoughts on “SHORT FILM: R.U.R.: Genesis”

  1. The retro 1960s spy feel is done well. I find the satirical nature of the film to be a little off-putting because it was unexpected. If a person is not in on the joke from the beginning (and it’s all about context), the viewer would think it was a bad collection of cliches rather than a send-up of those cliches. At least, I hope that’s what it is. Then again, I was put off by the fact that I was expecting a serious version of R.U.R. rather than the lesbian James Bond.

  2. Tam’s rule: If a company has ‘smart’ or ‘intelligent’ in their name, they are usually the opposite.

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