Women in Spaaace! (Part 2)

Over at Kirkus Reviews this week, I look a second science fiction books that put women in space — this one focusing on military sf

Check out Women in Space (Part 2) over at the Kirkus Reviews blog.

2 thoughts on “Women in Spaaace! (Part 2)”

  1. Fine article (both parts), John.

    I suppose, just to be fair and all, there should be a following article on how few men protagonists there are in gothic and romance fiction. Okay, that’s a bit snarky, but the point is women wrote what they wrote in literature and genre fiction and men did the same. Readers had their preferences usually based on bias about the subject matter, such as men were usually in the research and science side of things back in the day, just as, in that same day, kids rooms were painted pink or blue, boys played with trucks, girls with dolls. Sure it’s a lot of whooey now, but it was just the way it was, accepted by all, in the 50s for example. Still there is the same discussion in mystery fiction about when and why the female P.I. appeared.

    1. Cultural norms certainly played a part. That’s why it’s easier to write an article of women protagonists in space than one for men. :)

      Some folks avoid reading classic sf because of the outdated cultural norms. That’s their choice, of course. Personally, I enjoy classic sf *despite* the cultural norms. I think there’s a certain feel captured by golden age sf, for example, that’s hard to duplicate today precisely because it was written when we knew less about the universe. How silly would it be today to write an sf novel in which mankind finally makes it to Mars and finds a thriving civilization of four-armed aliens? In that sense, classic sf like Burroughs’ Mars novels serve as cultural artifacts that are enjoyable in their own right because it helps us see what sense of wonder was made from back then.

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