Archive for July, 2014

RIP: Lawrence Santoro

Sad news…

Starship Sofa and SF Site are reporting that author Lawrence Santoro has passed away after a bout with cancer.

Lawrence was the producer of the Tales to Terrify podcast and an author of many short fiction stories, many of which were collected in the 2011 collection Drink for the Thirst to Come.

It’s time another Book Cover Smackdown! This time around, covers of forthcoming steampunk titles go head-to-head. Your mission, should you choose to accept it: Pass artistic judgment!

Tell us:

  • Which of these covers do you like the most?
  • What works and what doesn’t work with these covers?
  • Do any of them make you want to learn more about and/or read the book?

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SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-07-26

Interviews & Profiles

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Here’s the cover and synopsis for the upcoming shared world collection Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad edited by George R. R. Martin.

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[NOTE: This is part of a series of Q&As with the Shirley Jackson Award nominees.]

Rosanne lives in South London, so it’s no surprise she has a story titled “Lambeth North” in the anthology Horror Without Victims. A longstanding member of the precariat, Rosanne engages in a variety of occupations including freelance editing, copywriting and care work.

Her novella Helen’s Story (PS Publishing) has been shortlisted for the 2013 Shirley Jackson prize and she has contributed to anthologies such as Rustblind and Silverbright (with Mat Joiner), Never Again: Weird Fiction Against Racism and Fascism, Extended Play: the Elastic Book of Music, The Slow Mirror: New Fiction by Jewish Writers, Conflicts, The Horror Anthology of Horror Anthologies and a new science fiction collection, Life Seed. You can visit her website here: rosannerabinowitz.wordpress.com

Rosanne was kind enough to answer a few of my questions about HELEN’S STORY!


Kristin Centorcelli: Congrats on the Shirley Jackson Award nomination! Will you tell us about your novella and what inspired you to write it?
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Convention Attention: Anime Midwest

Earlier this month, my husband and I attended Anime Midwest, in Chicago. As the name implies, the majority of guests, panels, and activities had a connection to Japanese anime shows and movies, Japanese culture, and Japanese fashion. Special guests included voice actors Caitlin Glass, Sonny Strait, Greg Ayres, Alexis Tipton, and Johnny Yong Bosch, the famous Japanese fashion brand Baby the Stars Shine Bright, and a number of independent fashion designers. There were also steampunk and comedy based musical guests, gaming experts on hand, webcomic artists and authors, and Japanese weaponry experts. If I listed all the panelists and other guests, you’d still be reading this column three hours from now
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Lisa Jensen is the author of the novels, Alias Hook, and The Witch From the Sea, proprietress of the arts and entertainment blog, Lisa Jensen Online Express, and longtime film critic and columnist for the alternative weekly, Good Times, in Santa Cruz, CA.

Alias Hook was published by Thomas Dunne Books on July 8, 2014. I had the chance to speak with Lisa about it…

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Deadline in reporting that Amazon has ordered a pilot episode for a drama series based on Philip K. Dick’s famous alternate history novel The Man In The High Castle. The book posits an alternate history in which Germany won World War II and now occupies the United States.

The order went to Ridley Scott’s production company Scott Free, who owns the rights. The script is being written by former X-Files writer Frank Spotnitz.

This is not the first news of this novel being adapted. Back in 2013, it was being reported that the SyFy channel was interested in adapting the series, but that apparently went nowhere. Now, Amazon has expressed an interest in the adaptation. Time will tell if actually pans out this time.

What fans really wanna know, can two Star Fleet offciers share a starship…without driving each other crazy?

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SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-07-25

Interviews & Profiles

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[NOTE: This is part of a series of Q&As with the Shirley Jackson Award nominees.]

Michael Rowe was born in Ottawa in 1962 and has lived in Beirut, Havana, Geneva, and Paris. An award-winning journalist, and literary nonfiction writer, he is the author of Writing Below the Belt, a critically-acclaimed study of censorship, erotica and popular culture, as well as the essay collections Looking for Brothers and Other Men’s Sons. His essays, articles, and reviews have appeared in the Globe & Mail, National Post, The Advocate, and The Huffington Post, as well as CFQ, The Scream Factory, All-Hallows, among many others. For 17 years he was the first-tier Canadian correspondent for Fangoria. He has won the Lambda Literary Award, the Randy Shilts Award, and the Spectrum Award, and has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award, the Associated Church Press Award, and the International Horror Guild Award. As the creator and editor of the critically acclaimed horror anthologies Queer Fear and Queer Fear 2, he was hailed by Clive Barker in 2002 as having “changed forever the shape of horror fiction.” He is married and lives in Toronto. Enter, Night was his first novel. His second, Wild Fell, was published in December 2013 by ChiZine Publications.

Michael kindly answered a few of my questions…


Kristin Centorcelli: Congrats on the Shirley Jackson Award nomination! Will you tell us about your novel and what inspired you to write it?
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In this series, I ask various publishing professionals (including authors, bloggers, editors, agents etc.) to recommend 2-3 authors or books they feel haven’t received the recognition they deserve.

Today’s recommendations are by AJ Colucci. A.J. Colucci is the critically acclaimed author of THE COLONY and SEEDERS, which combine true, cutting-edge science with the adrenaline-rush of a thriller. SEEDERS was described by Douglas Preston as “gripping and brilliantly original.” Her debut novel THE COLONY received a starred review in Publishers Weekly, and Booklist called it “a frightening combination of well-researched science and scenes of pure horror.” A.J. Colucci was a journalist and editor for 15 years and has authored hundreds of magazine and newspaper articles.
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Robin Hobb (penname for Megan Lindholm) is a globally recognized, acclaimed writer. Her tales of Fitzchivalry Farseer are some of the most beloved fantasies on the shelves. She’s written two trilogies about the Royal Bastard and has begun a third trilogy which is being called “Fitz and the Fool.”  Here at the Completist, I’ve tried to feature authors who may have flown under the radar but this time around, I’m featuring a series that doesn’t necessarily feature the author’s best known character. Admittedly, Robin Hobb is far from such an “under the radar” author. (At one point in time, there was talk of her outselling George R.R. Martin in Europe). With that, let me introduce you to Bingtown, a port/trading city south of the Six Duchies (the primary location of the novels featuring FitzChivalry Farseer) and the primary setting for “The Liveship Traders” trilog. Like some previous installments of this column, it has been quite a while since I read these books (I read them as each book was published 1998, 1999, 2000), but much of the emotional impact of the novels remains very strongly with me.

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Here is the description and table of contents for the new audio anthology The Year’s Top Ten Tales of Science Fiction 6 edited by Allan Kaster…a marvelous collection of stories with nearly 10 hours of listening pleasure…

An unabridged audio collection of the best of the best science fiction stories published in 2013 by current and emerging masters of the genre, edited by Allan Kaster, as narrated by Tom Dheere, Nancy Linari, and Dara Rosenberg. More than 9 ½ hours on 8 CDs. In “Zero for Conduct” by Greg Egan, an Afghani teenager, living in a near-future Iran with her exiled grandfather, makes a game-changing superconductor discovery. A young girl struggles to survive on a planet, with a stringent class structure, where Doors are used to go off-world in “Exit, Interrupted” by C. W. Johnson. “Pathways” by Nancy Kress, follows a teenage girl from a small Kentucky mountain town, in a near-future U. S., struggling with her family and culture as she seeks treatment for Fatal Familial Insomnia. In “Entangled” by Ian R. MacLeod, an Indian woman, in a Britain turned upside down by a disease that links people s minds, searches for answers to her personal catastrophe. In “The Irish Astronaut” by Val Nolan, a colleague brings the ashes of an astronaut, who died in the Aquarius disaster, to Ireland for final burial. In “Among Us” by Robert Reed, a government agency goes to extraordinary lengths to identify and track the aliens among us. “A Map of Mercury” by Alastair Reynolds, showcases the plight of a failed artist dispatched to retrieve an artistic genius from a collective of cyborgs parading across the face of Mercury. In “Martian Blood” by Allen M. Steele, a researcher from Earth goes on an expedition into the untamed regions of Mars to extract blood from its natives. “The She-Wolf s Hidden Grin” by Michael Swanwick, set in the same milieu as Gene Wolfe s The Fifth Head of Cerberus, follows the childhoods of two sisters on a planet far from Earth. Finally, in “The Best We Can” by Carrie Vaughn, a frustrated scientist pursues first contact among an apathetic populace.

Here’s the table of contents…
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A.M. Dellamonica, author of Child of a Hidden Sea, joins John Anealio and Patrick Hester this week on The Functional Nerds Podcast.

Listen below, or at The Functional Nerds, or subscribe to The Functional Nerds Podcast through iTunes.

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Here’s the synopsis for the Tonia Brown’s new Southern horror novel, Sundowners:

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SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-07-24

Interviews & Profiles

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[NOTE: This is part of a series of Q&As with the Shirley Jackson Award nominees.]

Mark Morris became a full-time writer in 1988 on the Enterprise Allowance Scheme, and a year later saw the release of his first novel, Toady. He has since published a further sixteen novels, among which are Stitch, The Immaculate, The Secret of Anatomy, Fiddleback, The Deluge and four books in the popular Doctor Who range.

His short stories, novellas, articles and reviews have appeared in a wide variety of anthologies and magazines, and he is editor of the highly-acclaimed Cinema Macabre, a book of fifty horror movie essays by genre luminaries, for which he won the 2007 British Fantasy Award.

His most recently published or forthcoming work includes a novella entitled It Sustains for Earthling Publications, a Torchwood novel entitled Bay of the Dead, several Doctor Who audios for Big Finish Productions, a follow-up volume to Cinema Macabre entitled Cinema Futura and a new short story collection, Long Shadows, Nightmare Light.


Kristin Centorcelli: Congrats on the Shirley Jackson Award nomination! Will you tell us about your novella and what inspired you to write it?
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Recent Graphic Novel Reads of Interest

After spending all of my previous column focused on the comics of Joe R. Lansdale, I’ve decided to devote this entire missive to recent reads.

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Recent Ecological Science Fiction

Over at the Kirkus Reviews blog, I take a look at a small handful of recent science fiction (or sf-related) books that deal with ecological themes…

Go read Recent Ecological Fiction at Kirkus Reviews…

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