This is part of a series of Q&As with the authors of The Apex Book of World SF 3 edited by Lavie Tidhar.

The stories in The Apex Book of World SF 3 run the gamut from science fiction, to fantasy, to horror. Some are translations (from German, Chinese, French, Spanish, and Swedish), and some were written in English. The authors come from Asia and Europe, Africa and Latin America. Their stories are all wondrous and wonderful, and showcase the vitality and diversity that can be found in the field. They are a conversation, by voices that should be heard.


1. Tell us a little about yourself.

Writer, artist, freelance journalist. Published my first SF-stories over 25 years ago. Two years ago I’ve started my own eBook publishing house and I’m publishing work from other writers as well as my own material.

2. Tell us a little about your story.

It’s set in an dystopian, cyberpunk environment and it’s about a drug-trip going bad

3. What was the inspiration for the story?

Probably Mister John Shirley, he knows a lot of weird stories from his own past.

4. What are you working on at the moment?

My next radio-play. It’s going to be a sort of space-opera but it takes place over a couple of hours in some strange alien bar, off world. Funny stuff. Lots of crazy dialog – well, mostly monologue by the female protagonist.

5. Who are some of your own favourite writers?

Jack Vance, Jack Vance and Jack Vance, among others such as Oscar Wilde, Raymond Chandler, Joseph Conrad.

6. What do you have coming out next?

Hm, I am probably moving to another genre. I’ve already written mystery and thriller radio plays. Think I will try a novel in this genre next. I promised my German publisher a new book. So, let there be blood and murder and craziness.


1. Tell us a little about yourself.

I wanna be Ellen Ripley when I grow up, or maybe Batman, or both. That’d be cool, being both of them.

In the meantime, I’m a tiny Mexican who tries to write both in Spanish and in broken/robotic English. I recently moved with my fiancé to Calimaya, a little town near an extinct volcano and not so far from
Mexico City. There, we’re the slaves personal assistants of three fat cats.

My stories have appeared in anthologies like Future Lovecraft (2011) and Sword & Mythos (2014), as well as the Mexican e-zine Penumbria.

You can read more (or maybe less) in my blog www.nellygeraldine.com

2. Tell us a little about your story.

“Ahuizotl” was my first sale ever and for that reason I feel a special affection for it. It was written originally in Spanish and translated into English by Silvia Moreno-Garcia. This was also the first of my pre Hispanic/Lovecraftian stories in which Mexica mythical creatures and gods are mixed with the Mythos.

It’s set in the early New Spain, a couple of decades after the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire, when a Spanish middle-aged nun travels to meet the grave of her brother. Then, there are monsters and slippery skin and water and shrieks. Go read it.

3. What was the inspiration for the story?

I wrote “Ahuizotl” with Historical Lovecraft anthology in mind. I wanted to write a Lovecraftian historical short story set in a kind of tricky, difficult time in Mexican history, an era of discovery and magical thinking at the same time. In his book on the history of the Spanish conquest, Bernal Díaz del Castillo wrote that the “new world” was like the fictional setting of Amadis de Gaula and that Aztec gods were diabolical beings. Many Spaniards truly believed they were surrounded by wizardry, demons and mythic creatures like the ones that inhabited chivalric romances; why not taking advantage of that for creating a story.

4. What are you working on at the moment?

A short story with experimental narrative which is taking me ages, but I’m enjoying a lot despite not being sure what I’m actually doing.

I’m also trying to write a YA novel in Spanish about cyborgs and Titan. I’ve already written a couple of chapters that were terrible, so I imagine this process will be painful but fun.

5. Who are some of your own favourite writers?

I have to say Lovecraft and Poe, of course; but also wonderful authors like Tove Jansson, Ursula K. LeGuin, Neil Gaiman, Aliette de Bodard. The ones I enjoy the most in Spanish: Jorge Luis Borges, Clemente Palma, Amparo Dávila.

6. What do you have coming out next?

Oddly enough, a poem that’ll be published soon in Stone Telling, which is making me nervous and exited since I don’t usually write poetry.

Silvia Moreno-Garcia invited me to be part of She Walks in Shadows, an all-women Lovecraftian anthology that’ll be out next year. Let’s hope my story will be chosen for that amazing project.

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