Fran Wilde is an author, programmer, and technology consultant who has worked as a science and engineering writer, a university professor, a sailing instructor, a game developer, and a jeweler’s assistant. Fran’s first novel, Bone Arrow, is forthcoming from Tor in 2015. Her short stories have appeared in Asimov’s, Beneath Ceaseless Skies (forthcoming), Nature, and The Impossible Futures anthology, while nonfiction interviews and roundtables writers have appeared under the banner “Cooking the Books” at Tor.com, Strange Horizons, the SFWA blog, and at franwilde.wordpress.com. You can also find Fran on twitter (as @Fran_Wilde), tumblr, and facebook.

Photo Credit: Dan Magus, 2014   
On Staying Ahead of Evolving Technology (OR: Things Fall Apart)

By Fran Wilde

Diana Rios swore she’d put the next stung brigger who entered her garrison med tent out of their misery with her bare hands.

“What possessed you to put a live wasp in your mouth, Jersey?” she asked, before tearing an antihistamine pen cap off with her teeth.

“Ith wath a beth! Ow!”

- From “Like a Wasp to the Tongue,” by Fran Wilde, Asimov’s April/May 2014.

John DeNardo invited me to talk to SF Signal readers about the sensor wasps that appear in my Asimov’s April/May 2014 short story “Like a Wasp to the Tongue,” and I’m delighted to do so.

SF writers spend a lot of time thinking about where technology is headed. In particular, we try to stay far, far ahead of where technology might be headed. It’s part of the job description. Personally, I find it a lot of fun. But it isn’t an easy sort of fun. Tech moves faster every day.

In a former life as an engineering and science writer, I learned that one way to get a jump on technology and where it could evolve is to look at the problems that technology is currently creating for itself and for its users — the holes it digs for itself, simply by virtue of its own headwind.

I’m totally getting to the wasps. Bear with me.
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