Author Archive

[GUEST POST] Jeff Carlson Has Alien Sex


Jeff Carlson is the international bestselling author of Plague Year, Interrupt, and The Frozen Sky. To date, his work has been translated into sixteen languages worldwide. His new novel is Frozen Sky 2: Betrayed, available on Amazon, Nook, Kobo and Smashwords. Readers can find free excerpts, videos, contests, and more on his website at www.jverse.com

Jeff Carlson Has Alien Sex!!!!

by Jeff Carlson

Dammit, Jim, I’m a writer, not an artist. I have a loud imagination. That’s how I write my stories. I follow the voices and pictures in my head. But I can’t draw to save my life, and artistic composition is beyond me.

When I first released my sequel to The Frozen Sky, I hurt my brain trying to wrap myself around the angry or sarcastic comments posted about the cover. Granted, the heroine is pretty, and people do judge a book by its cover. Understood. We’re a visual, quick-thinking species, but I groaned in frustration at every outraged declaration that I was a sexist ape. The heroine is practically a poster child for The Empowered Female.
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Jeff Carlson is the international bestselling author of Plague Year, Interrupt, and The Frozen Sky. To date, his work has been translated into sixteen languages worldwide. His new novel is Frozen Sky 2: Betrayed, available on Amazon, Nook, Kobo and Smashwords. Readers can find free excerpts, videos, contests, and more on his website at www.jverse.com

The E-Report (Part 4)
…or: A Gorgeous Swan Dive into a Big Can Of Worms

by Jeff Carlson

Adding to my weird saga, I swerved sideways from self-publishing at the height of The Frozen Sky‘s popularity.

Through a joint effort, my agent and I placed epic disaster novel Interrupt with 47North, the e-devils themselves, who released the book in July 2013. Amazon’s new publishing wing cannot accurately be described as a traditional publisher, but they have all the best elements of New York in professional editors, marketing teams, publicists, artists, accountants, and, yes, even a good lawyer or three.
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Jeff Carlson is the international bestselling author of Plague Year, Interrupt, and The Frozen Sky. To date, his work has been translated into sixteen languages worldwide. His new novel is Frozen Sky 2: Betrayed, available on Amazon, Nook, Kobo and Smashwords. Readers can find free excerpts, videos, contests, and more on his website at www.jverse.com

The E-Report (Part 3)

by Jeff Carlson

I’d like to say I’m reporting live from the epicenter of the e-revolution, but I usually feel more like I’m furiously treading water across the shuddering face of a tsunami as it bashes into a major city on the coastline. By that I mean the water is murky, treacherous, moving fast, and frequently altering direction as well as absorbing blows.

Don’t get me wrong. I like bodysurfing tidal waves through buildings and streets crowded with obstacles the size of a bus. Mayhem is my middle name, and the water is also full of interesting people and treasure.

If you missed it, here’s how the tectonic shift began for me:
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[GUEST POST] Jeff Carlson on The E-Report

Sometimes I wish I was an old man so I could have written a pile of books that are out of print.

What?

That’s right.  I wish I’d written books that are out of print so I could relist ‘em on Kindle, Nook, iTunes and Kobo at rock bottom modern e-book prices.  I’d make a fortune.  Instead I gotta do things the old-fangled way and write more books first!

Not long ago, I felt like I was the Last Of The Mohicans — a writer who’d come up the traditional path from placing short stories in print magazines to finding an agent to selling novels to a Big 6 publisher who produced, printed, warehoused and distributed fat stacks of dead trees.  (The publisher also fielded returns and issued Byzantine, biannual royalty statements).

Now I’m dangerously close to becoming a wild-eyed e-revolutionary.

After some success republishing my short stories online, knowing exactly what New York had to offer, I self-published my fourth novel in October.

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Jeff Carlson is the author of Plague Year, Plague War (a finalist for the Philip K. Dick Award), and Plague Zone. To date, his work has been translated into fifteen languages worldwide. His short stories and nonfiction have appeared in a number of top venues such as Asimov’s, Boys’ Life, Strange Horizons and the Fast Forward 2 anthology. His latest book, The Frozen Sky, is available in paperback and as an eBook.

Adventures in Self-Publishing: What I’ve Learned So Far

Self-publishing is five jobs and a half.  By comparison, writing the book was easy. It was also waaaaay more enjoyable.
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Jeff Carlson is the author of Plague Year, Plague War (a finalist for the 2008 Philip K. Dick Award), and Plague Zone. To date, his work has been translated into fourteen languages. His short stories and nonfiction have appeared in a number of top venues such as Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Boys’ Life, Strange Horizons and the Fast Forward 2 anthology. His latest book, The Frozen Sky, is available as an eBook.

Aliens, Spaceships and The Frozen Sky

I’m fourth generation sf/f.  My great-grandmother built her library around Frank L. Baum’s Oz series, the original fantasy epic.  She passed those beautiful hardcovers to her son, my grandfather, who kept them alongside “Doc” E.E. Smith novels  such as Triplanetary and Galactic Patrol, which were the cutting edge in his time.

Later, when I was a boy, my grandfather introduced me to the world’s first media tie-ins like Han Solo’s Revenge and Splinter Of The Mind’s Eye.  This was not a man who sneered at popular good fun.  He entranced me with Star Wars books, then fed my new addiction with the classics.

At the same time, my father was bringing home doorstoppers like The Hobbit and Clan Of The Cave Bear, which reads very much like alt history with strange people in a strange world.

My point is I know a good piece of science fiction when I see it.  Tell me this doesn’t fit the bill:

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[GUEST POST] Jeff Carlson on Bad Reviews


Guest blogging for us today is Jeff Carlson. Jeff is best known for the Plague Year series and his bestselling Kindle novella “The Frozen Sky,” which is also available on Nook and will soon appear on iBooks. As a working pro, Jeff lives on the other side of the author-reader connection. He promised to give us a look behind the curtain, which he calls…

ROSE-COLORED DEMONS

For me and many writers, one of the most eye-opening changes since the e-revolution has been the rise and importance of book reviews on personal blogs and corporate sites like Goodreads, Amazon, and B&N.

To writers, strong word-of-mouth is catnip. Even bad reviews can be useful in honing your craft.

I spend a lot of time alone in a room with a laptop listening to the voices in my head. That sounds like a joke, but it’s a large part of my job description. There’s no one to hang out with at the water cooler in my office. Heck, there’s no water cooler! That’s why it’s especially cool to get fan mail or to have my Google minions find reviews such as: “This novella was so fast paced and action packed from the very first line that I was sucked in like a two by four in a F5 twister!”

Reading that, I thought, Fantastic. She gets it.

Capturing you is exactly what I want – to connect, to entertain, to make you a 2×4 in my tornado.

When eight people say the ending is abrupt, that’s useful, too. My brain says to me, Okay, you thought you had every element in place, but you’d better add at least another paragraph to wrap things up. Readers want to walk away with a feeling of completion. Sometimes I move too fast, so I’m learning to take it down a notch.

Even the people who hate a story are right. No writer reaches everybody, and it’s perfectly fair for someone to leave a low-starred review if he doesn’t feel like he got his money’s worth. That’s expected.

But in today’s brave new world of e-media, my inbox is also peppered with a steady dose of diehard political outrage, accusations, and messages from weird alternate realities.

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