Interviews Archives

Django Wexler graduated from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh with degrees in creative writing and computer science, and worked for the university in artificial intelligence research. Eventually he migrated to Microsoft in Seattle, where he now lives with two cats and a teetering mountain of books. When not planning Shadow Campaigns, he wrangles computers, paints tiny soldiers, and plays games of all sorts. Visit him online at djangowexler.com.

Django was kind enough to answer a few of my question about his new book for young readers, THE FORBIDDEN LIBRARY!


Kristin Centorcelli: Congratulations on your new book, THE FORBIDDEN LIBRARY! Will you tell us a little about it and what inspired you to write it?

Django Wexler: Thanks! The Forbidden Library is about a girl named Alice who lives in New York in 1931. She comes downstairs one evening to find her father talking to a fairy in her kitchen, and a few days later he mysteriously disappears. She’s sent to stay with an uncle named Geryon, who lives in a big house with a library she’s not allowed into. Once she sneaks in (because what self-respecting heroine wouldn’t?) things start to get really strange…
Read the rest of this entry

Michael R. Underwood, author of Attack The Geek, joins John Anealio and Patrick Hester this week on The Functional Nerds Podcast.

Listen below, or at The Functional Nerds, or subscribe to The Functional Nerds Podcast through iTunes.

Read the rest of this entry

Ian Miller is an artist, illustrator and writer based in the U.K. He graduated from the Painting Faculty of St Martin’s School of Art in 1970. Between 1975 and 1976 he worked for Ralph Bakshi on his Feature animation Wizards and in the 80′s worked on a second Bakshi film called Cool World. Since then Miller has done pre-production work on numerous films including Shrek.

The first collection of his work was published in 1979 by Dragon’s Dream under the heading The Green Dog Trumpet. This was followed shortly afterwards by a second volume entitled Secret Art. Miller is currently working on numerous private commissions, films and projects, including ‘The Broken Novel’.

His new book, The Art of Ian Miller, was just released this week from Titan publishing.

Hre’s my chat with Ian about his work…

Read the rest of this entry

MIND MELD: Sentenced to Read One Author for Life

[Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]

Your crime? You know what you did! Your sentence? A lifetime reading only one author. Sure, prison is great for catching up on your reading, but…

Q: If you were imprisoned for life and your genre-loving (but slightly deranged) warden allowed you to read work from the bibliography of only one author, who would you choose? Why?

Read the rest of this entry

Tim Lebbon is the author of nearly thirty books, including The Island and, with Chris Golden, the acclaimed Hidden Cities series. He is the winner of numerous British Fantasy Awards and a Bram Stoker Award. He lives in the Welsh countryside with his wife and children.

His brand new book, Coldbrook, just came out from Titan, and since I loved the book so much, I was thrilled to ask Tim a few questions about it!


Kristin Centorcelli: Congrats on the new book, COLDBROOK! I absolutely loved it. I hesitate to call it a zombie book, because it’s so much more, but what was your inspiration for it? Where did the idea come from?
Read the rest of this entry

[Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]

“Let me buy you a pint, Elric…”

This week, we posed the following to our panelists:

Q: We’ve all encountered characters in stories and novels that we’ve felt a real connection to, and would love to chat with more. Maybe buy them a drink. What characters have you encountered in Fantasy and SF that you’d like to buy a pint for?

Read the rest of this entry

Donna Glee Williams is a writer, seminar leader, and creative coach. A sort of Swiss Army knife of the page, Donna Glee has seen her work published in anthologies, newsstand glossies, literary magazines, academic journals, reference books, big-city dailies, online venues, and spoken-word podcasts, as well as on stage and CD recordings. These days, her focus is on speculative fiction, aka fantasy and science fiction.

Her novel, THE BRAIDED PATH, came out in March, and she was kind enough to answer a few questions about it, and more!
Read the rest of this entry

Sharon Lynn Fisher writes books for the geeky at heart – sci-fi flavored stories full of adventure and romance. She has a passion for world-building and twisty plots, and themes that recur in her writing include what it means to be human and symbiosis in human relationships.

Her latest release is The Ophelia Prophecy, a biopunk flavored, post-apocalyptic tale out now from Tor. A mix of light science, heavy moral conflicts, and sizzling sexual tension, The Ophelia Prophecy is sure to please the romance reader looking for something different, or the SF fan looking for something hot.

After Heather Massey of The Galaxy Express and Sharon binge-watched all 110 episodes of Space Ghost Coast to Coast-because, you know, Zorak-they chatted about The Ophelia Prophecy, freaky orange cats, and praying mantis sex.


Heather Massey: Describe a typical week for Sharon Lynn Fisher.

Sharon Lynn Fisher: I’m not sure there’s any such thing – a result of being a freelancer and a half-time single parent! My working hours (which can occur at any hour, any day of the week, in any state of dress) are divided between my contracted fiction, new writing projects, and my work as senior editor for SilkWords, a new “pick your own path” romance short story site. Whatever is left goes to my daughter, my boyfriend and HIS daughter, and one freaky orange cat.
Read the rest of this entry

[Here's an addendum to the this week's Mind Meld that asked: Where would you take the T.A.R.D.I.S., coming from Rachel Swirksy]

Q: If you could take one trip in the T.A.R.D.I.S., where would you go?

Read the rest of this entry

MIND MELD: Where Would You Take the T.A.R.D.I.S.?

[Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]

It was the recent Mind Meld on Favorite Convention Panels, combined with the romance of the phrase “All of time and space. Everything that ever happened or ever will…,” that inspired me to ask our panelists this question:

Q: If you could take one trip in the T.A.R.D.I.S., where would you go?

Here’s what they said:
Read the rest of this entry

Brian Staveley, author of The Emperor’s Blades, joins John Anealio and Patrick Hester this week on The Functional Nerds Podcast.

Listen below, or at The Functional Nerds, or subscribe to The Functional Nerds Podcast through iTunes.

Read the rest of this entry

Matthew Hughes writes fantasy and suspense fiction. he’s won the Crime Writers of Canada’s Arthur Ellis Award, and has been shortlisted for the Aurora, Nebula, Philip K. Dick, A.E. Van Vogt, and Derringer Awards. He’s worked as a writer all his adult life, as a journalist, a staff speechwriter to the Canadian Ministers of Justice and Environment, and as a freelance corporate and political speechwriter in British Columbia. He’s also a former director of the Federation of British Columbia Writers. He is the author of several dozen short stories, some of which have been collected in The Gist Hunter and Other Stories (2005) and Nine Tales of Henghis Hapthorn (2013). His novels include Fools Errant, Black Brillion, several novels about a far-futuristic Sherlock Holmesian detective Henghis Hapthorn (Majestrum, The Spiral Labyrinth, and Hespira), The Commons, Template, the To Hell and Back superhero sequence (The Damned Busters, Costume Not Included and Hell to Pay), and Paroxysm. His latest is anotehr collection of short fiction,The Compleat Guth Bandar.

We had the chance to talk to Matthew about his writing, his influences and why his fiction is so damned funny.

Read the rest of this entry

Kara Vallow has been a producer on Seth MacFarlane’s slate of animated shows such as Family Guy and American Dad, as well as Dilbert, Johnny Bravo, and Drawn Together. So when MacFarlane invited her to take charge of the animated segments for Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, she was uncertain if she could do justice to the material. The result was stunning narratives about historical figures such as Giordano Bruno, William Herschel, and Isaac Newton.

In this interview we discuss how her animation team developed the unique style for the segments, the lasting impact of Carl Sagan, working with Ann Druyan and Neil deGrasse Tyson, bringing the Flammarion woodcut to life, Isaac Asimov’s The Last Question, and the Family Guy Star Wars specials.

Running time: 41 minutes

Tell us what you think – leave us a voicemail!

Can’t see the widget above? That’s okay – just call 720-277-9082 or shoot us an email at: voicemail@sfsignal.com

Pip Ballantine & Tee Morris, authors of Dawn’s Early Light, join John Anealio and Patrick Hester this week on The Functional Nerds Podcast.

Listen below, or at The Functional Nerds, or subscribe to The Functional Nerds Podcast through iTunes.

Read the rest of this entry

[Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]

The Bram Stoker Award final ballot was recently announced, reminding me why horror as a genre is so much fun, so in that spirit, I asked our panel these questions:

Q: What first piqued your interest in horror, and why do you enjoy writing in the genre? What direction do you see the genre taking in the future, and who are a few of your favorite horror writers, books, or stories?

Here’s what they had to say…

Read the rest of this entry

Stephanie Saulter is a freelance business consultant who read biology at MIT before majoring in English Literature and minoring in Anthropology. Born in the Caribbean, she now lives in England. The first book in her ®Evolution series, Gemsigns, is currently available in the UK and will be published in the US in May. The second book in the series, Binary, will be available in the UK this spring, and she is currently working on the third book in the series. Learn more about Stephanie at her website, or by following her on twitter.

Stephanie was kind enough to answer some questions about the ®Evolution series.


Andrea Johnson: What can you tell us about Gemsigns and its sequel, Binary? What’s the elevator pitch for the ®Evolution series?

Stephanie Saulter: The bulk of the action in Gemsigns takes place a year after an international edict – think of it as an updated Declaration of Human Rights – resulted in the mass emancipation of genetically modified humans, or ‘gems’, from the biotech companies that had created and owned them.
Read the rest of this entry

James L. Cambias is a writer, a game designer, a New Orleanian, a cook, a parent, and a cat-slapper. He just recently released his debut novel, A Darkling Sea.

We had the opportunity to chat with him about his book, writing, Star Trek, zeppelins, and space exploration.


SF Signal: Hi James, thanks for taking the time to speak with us about your first book. First off, what can you tell us about yourself? When did you first discover science fiction, and why did you stick with it?
Read the rest of this entry

Marie Brennan is a former academic with a background in archaeology, anthropology, and folklore, which she now puts to rather cockeyed use in writing fantasy. She lives in the San Francisco Bay Area, where she spends her time practicing piano, studying karate, and playing a variety of role-playing games.

Her many publications include over forty short stories, the Onyx Court series, and A Natural History of Dragons. Her second novel in the Memoirs of Lady Trent series, The Tropic of Serpents, hit bookstore shelves on March 4th 2014.
Read the rest of this entry

Sarah Silbert, Senior Editor for Engadget, joins John Anealio and Patrick Hester this week on The Functional Nerds Podcast.

Listen below, or at The Functional Nerds, or subscribe to The Functional Nerds Podcast through iTunes.
Read the rest of this entry

MIND MELD: Epic Geek Debates & Rants

[Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]

Geeks are a passionate and opinionated people. Put two of them in a room and more often than not a debate and/or rant will ensue. Sometimes it’s not pretty. With that in mind, we asked our esteemed panel of geeks the following:

Q: What was the first or most memorable geeky pop-culture debate you ever had? Or what’s that one thing you can’t stop ranting about? What was the outcome? Are you still on speaking terms with your opponent? Why are you so passionate about this?

Read the rest of this entry

 Page 1 of 40  1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »