Tidbits Archives

SF Tidbits for 7/29/07

  • New free fiction: “Creatures of Vibration” by Harl Vincent. “Carr Parker sat day-dreaming at the Nomad‘s controls. More than a week of Earth time had passed since the self-styled “vagabonds of space” had left Europa, and now they were fast approaching the great ringed orb of Saturn with the intention of exploring her satellites.”
  • From the July issue of Locus, Locus Online has excerpts from interviews with Peter S. Beagle and Paolo Bacigalupi.
  • Chronotopicality in SF in 2006. Colin Harvey reflects upon reading David Hartwell’s & Kathryn Cramer’s Year’s Best SF 12. “Is it any wonder that the defining emotion in SF in 2006 was anxiety?”
  • Warren Ellis interviews William Gibson at Wired. [via Gravity Lens]
  • Quiz: Cite the source…Scientology or Weekly World News?

SF Tidbits for 7/28/07

SF Tidbits for 7/27/07

  • At SciFi Wire, John Joseph Adams profiles Chris Roberson, author of Set the Seas on Fire.
  • Matthew Jarpe is a hack. “One of the common epithets people throw at a writer they don’t like is ‘hack.’ That’s ‘a writer who exploits his or her ability primarily for money.’ As if producing a product of art with commercial potential is wrong. Well, here’s the thing, I’m a hack.”
  • Jeff VanderMeer has posted mystery excerpts from his New Weird Anthology. The first person to correctly guess the author who wrote them wins a copy of the book.
  • Over at Amazon’s blog, VanderMeer lists 13 Reasons to Read Richard Morgan’s Thirteen. See also the SF Signal review.
  • The Wall Street Journal profiles Robert A. Heinlein. [via Cynical-C]
  • JK Rowling says she will publish a Harry Potter Encyclopedia. [via No Blasters]
  • Pat’s Fantasy Hotlist interviews Peter F. Hamilton (The Dreaming Void). “As a species we’re just not psychologically adjusted to living for more than a century, yet billions are being poured into research that leads to increased life expectancy. Suppose it works out, and we can live for three of ten times longer than today. That’s the kind of question which SF exists for.”
  • Over at his AOL gig, John Scazli looks at overrated books and cited Catcher in the Rye as his pick. “Tell us of one piece of culture — book, movie, album, painting, play, architectural “masterpiece,” whatever — that you think is wildly overrated.”
  • Lou Anders responds to Discover magazine’s “Blinded by Science: Fictional Reality” article.
  • Borders bookstores has cut back their soft seating by 30%. Ed Champion comes to the defense of sitting in bookstores.
  • It’s official: J.J. Abrams, director the upcoming Star Trek movie, confirmed the casting of Heroes star Zachary Quinto as a young Spock and surprised the audience with the announcement that original Spock actor Leonard Nimoy would also appear in the film.
  • The Avalanche Software Art Blog is still going strong with nearly very post offering up some cool, artsy goodness by their very talented staff. Their latest entry is is a caricature of Qui-Gon Jinn.

SF Tidbits for 7/26/07

SF Tidbits for 7/25/07

SF Tidbits for 7/24/07

SF Tidbits for 7/23/07

  • Pan Macmillan is releasing an Exclusive Boxed Edition of Peter F. Hamilton’s Dreaming Void. [via Peter F. Hamilton]
  • SFFaudio has started a campaign to get the shelved J. Michael Straczynski radio drama “The Adventures of Apocalypse Al” onto the air.
  • It’s not just science fiction, comic books are dying, too. Or are they? [via Gravity Lens]
  • Ian Sales tells us Why Television Sci-Fi Sucks. “Television sf may be the intellectually-challenged brother of written sf, but if it wants to be “good” then it’s still bound by the same rules, it should still use the same techniques.”
  • Bloomberg reports that sales of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows reached 8.3 million copies on the day of its release. [via GalleyCat]

SF Tidbits for 7/22/07

SF Tidbits for 7/21/07

  • At SciFi Wire, John Joseph Adams profiles Ben Peek, author of Black Sheep.
  • Amazon Blog has pasted part 2 of an interview with William Gibson, author of Spook Country.
  • Artist Bob Eggleton shows us the cover art for an upcoming Neal Asher book.
  • New/Updated at Gutenberg: “The Hills of Home” by Alfred Coppel.
  • Edward Champion offers 7 Additional Ways to Cultivate a Lifetime Reading Habit, following LifeParticles’ 14 Ways to Cultivate a Lifetime Reading Habit.
  • The Book Tour connects authors and readers. See when authors are coming to your area with a Google Map mashup! [via Booksquare]
  • Paul DiFillipo posts his essay on sf author Michael Bishop as it appeared in the 2003 reference work The Scribner Writers Series: Supernatural Fiction Writers. “A talent capable of being decanted into many different molds, genre and otherwise, Bishop’s skills and vision translate from one medium to another without diminishment or concealment.” [via Matt Cheney]
  • The Great Eric muses about The Sin of High School English Class, or Why He Hates Classic Literature. “Starship Troopers taught me more about fascism than pretty much anything else I’ve ever read, because it’s the only book that forced me to think about it on a higher level than ‘Hitler is evil!’ “
  • Kylopod discusses the myth of the fantasy genre. ” ‘Fantasy’ is a funny name for a genre. The word suggests make-believe. All fiction is make-believe, but fantasy deals specifically with events that not only didn’t happen, but couldn’t happen. We, the readers, allow our minds to enter a universe that we know could never exist. The books tap into some part of our subconscious where rationality has not penetrated, and for a brief period of time we “believe” in magic. The genre is not about exploring possibilities, as science fiction does, but about losing ourselves in impossibilities. As Orson Scott Card put it in his book How to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy, ‘science fiction is about what could be but isn’t; fantasy is about what couldn’t be’ “
  • Here’s John C. Wright on Ursula K LeGuin. (HEL-lo!)
  • Check out this cool Robbie the Robot bank/alarm clock combo.
  • Holy Calamity looks at Dan Dare, Pilot of the Paleo-Future. “Dan Dare went on to have as massive an impact on British science fiction and comic as you’d expect from a magazine selling two million copies a week.”
  • Submitted without comment: The Fat Wonder Woman Blog. [via Neatorama]
  • SciFi Scanner shows us John Cleese meeting Doctor Who.
  • BoingBoing points us to a Worth1000 Photoshop contest with the topic of If Trekkies Ruled.
  • This is what happens when Zombies go vegetarian. [via Dark Roast]

SF Tidbits for 7/20/07

SF Tidbits for 7/19/07

SF Tidbits for 7/18/07

Tube Bits for 07/17/2007

“Tube bits?”, you say, wondering what the heck those are. Well, we already have John’s excellent ‘Tid Bits’ posts, but I thought we could branch out and focus on science fiction television. Tube Bits will focus on news items that deal with SF on TV. We’ll scour the web to find interesting nuggets of information, so you don’t have to!

  • The Sci Fi Channel is resurrecting Farscape as a series of 10 webisodes. No word on casting or premiere date. [Via -the Intertubes in general]
  • The Sci Fi Channel also announced their development slate for original programming. And I use the term ‘original’ in the ‘we take two or more ideas from existing properties and mash them together to make an original show’ sense. We’ve got a re-hash of The Incredibles, a mashup of Buck Rogers and John Carter Of Mars, the Odyssey meets American Gods and a bunch of ‘reality’ programming, as only Sci Fi can do. Very few look interesting.
  • NBC announces Sci Fi Mondays. Not as cool sounding as Sci Fridays, but hey, its SF on a prime time network. NBC will air Chuck, Heroes and Journeyman. Expect the premieres of most of these series in September.
  • Another clueless reporter discovers Battlestar Galactica and realizes not is it good TV, but science fiction can be good too. Describing BG as one of ‘those’ kinds of shows is a tip off to cluelessness.
  • More reportage xon upcoming SF series on the major networks. Apparently, SF is either stories about nerds, or stories for nerds. I guess you can’t have SF for regular people? I thought I was regular people.
  • And lastly, Slice Of Sci Fi has an interview with Claudia Black, whose mere presence in a show can kill it off (Farscape, SG-1, Dresden Files). (For Tim).

SF Tidbits for 7/17/07

  • Arrrrr! Andrew Wheeler reviews Pirate Freedom by Gene Wolfe.
  • Neil Walsh’s latest Books I’ve Been Avoiding: Overlooked or Over-hyped? column is up at SF Site: “Can there be such a thing as too many books? Lately I’ve been feeling I do indeed have too many books I haven’t read yet. But is that really too many books, or simply not enough time?”
  • Gail Martin shows off the cover of the next book in her Summoner series, The Blood King.
  • Washington Technology interviews John Scalzi. “One of the frequent complaints we hear about technology is that technology is isolating. I would argue the opposite. We are so connected now sometimes it’s hard to get away from each other.”
  • Scalzi, by the way, is giving free e-book copies of The Android’s Dream to overseas service people.
  • Tuesday YouTube: The original, pre-production trailer for Alien 3, which reflects the original William Gibson version (aliens on Earth). [via SciFi Scanner]
  • Here’s the transcript for NASA administrator Mike Griffin’s talk at the Heinlein Centennial. “So, a question that has often been asked and that I’ve asked myself is, ‘Was the growth of science fiction as a genre and hard science fiction in particular, a response to the cultural zeitgeist or was it a cause of it?'”
  • File under Things I Don’t Need But Want Anyway: An Alien Abduction Lamp.

SF Tidbits for 7/16/07

SF Tidbits for 7/14/07

SF Tidbits for 7/13/07

SF Tidbits for 7/12/07

SF Tidbits for 7/11/07

SF Tidbits for 7/10/07

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