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Lightspeed Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
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Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue (which is guest-edited this month by Ellen Datlow):
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Daily Science Fiction has announced its October line-up of free stories.
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Flash Fiction Online, October 2014Here is the table of contents for the new issue of Flash Fiction Online:

  • “The Liar” by David Austin
  • “Columbidae” by Nathaniel Lee
  • “If You Want” by Luc Reid

This issue, which goes live October 1st, was edited by Suzanne Vincent and features a cover image by Tony Grist and cover design by Anna Yeatts.

Single ebooks and subscriptions are available via Weightless Books.

Support Flash Fiction Online via Patreon.

Now at Kirkus: Gotham Central

This week over on the Kirkus Reviews Blog, I take a look at two books which may have inspired the new Fox TV Show: Gotham.

From the post:

With Gotham premiering September 22nd on Fox – and with all the positive buzz about the show – I couldn’t pass up on the chance to talk about Batman here at Kirkus. Especially considering my love for the character and the mythos. But Gotham isn’t really about Batman. It’s about the city which gave birth to him, and to so many other characters we’ve come to know so well. A city that breathes all on its own, and is, for all intents and purposes, a character in its own right. How do I tackle that one?

Want to read more?  Of course you do! So click over to the Kirkus Reviews Blog and check out the rest of the post…

Over at the Kirkus Reviews blog this week, I talk about How I Learned to Respect the Power of Fiction.

I blame Bradley Denton.

Check it out, won’t you?


Shira Lipkin is a writer, poet, and editor in Boston; in her spare time, she volunteers with the Boston Area Rape Crisis Center. She attends a lot of burlesque shows, but that’s not where the glitter comes from. Her cat is bigger than her dog. Mat Joiner lives in Birmingham, England. He loves flippancy, Pierrots, ghosts and green men. He thinks “canalpunk” should be a thing but hasn’t written the manifesto yet. Their poetry has appeared in Strange Horizons, Stone Telling, Through the Gate, and other wonderful places. Together, they fight crime! Shira and Mat are also co-editors of Liminality, a new magazine of speculative poetry.

Liminality: There Is No Box

by Shira Lipkin

The thing about poetry is that poetry is a revolutionary act.

This is not what we’re taught in schools! In the US, at least, we have our Norton guides of poetry that have the same set of poems kids have been made to study for decades, for centuries. Which quite reminds us of “Introduction to Poetry” by Billy Collins:
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Over at the Kirkus Reviews blog this week, I take a look at the latest body-swapping science fiction and fantasy books in an article titled Science Fiction Lets You to Slip Into Something More Comfortable.

Check it out, won’t you?

Arkady and Boris Strugatsky’s ROADSIDE PICNIC

A couple of years ago, I picked up a book to review for SF Signal, looking for something different. That book was Roadside Picnic, by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky, and it turned out to be one of those books that quietly never quite left my head.

Thinking about Roadside Picnic and its authors, as well as our last column on Stanislaw Lem, we get a good starting point for examining how science fiction developed outside of the United States. Given that a lot of SF has been published here in the US, we appear to be a leader in the genre, for better or worse.

At the same time, we forget, ignore or simply don’t realize that authors such as Lem and the Strugatskys were as big as the giants in the United States: on par with Bradbury, Asimov or Heinlein. Examining their publishing experiences and approaches to the genre is good to highlight the limits and potential of genre, but also where US authors and fans tend to put on blinders for the world around them.

As awareness of foreign SF grows (see Clarksworld’s Chinese SF project, funding now), it’s important to realize that a) this isn’t a new phenomenon, and b) SF isn’t limited to the United States and England.

On top of all that, go read Roadside Picnic. It’s a phenomenal book.

Go read Arkady and Boris Strugatsky’s Roadside Picnic over on the Kirkus Reviews blog.

Over at the Kirkus Reviews blog this week, I take a look at the latest Upcoming Science Fiction and Fantasy Adaptations.

Check it out, won’t you?

Over at the Kirkus Reviews blog this week, I name my picks for The Best Speculative Fiction Reads in September.

Check it out and tell me which titles I missed.

Here’s the table of contents for the new issue of Apex Magazine, a monthly science fiction, fantasy, and horror magazine featuring original, mind-bending short fiction from many of the top pros of the field, edited by Sigrid Ellis.
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Table of Contents: SQ Mag #16

Here’s the table of contents for the free online magazine SQ Mag, issue #16:
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The new issue of Clarkesworld is now posted:
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Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
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Lightspeed Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
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Flash Fiction Online, September 2014Here is the table of contents for the new issue of Flash Fiction Online:

  • “The Cell I’m In” by Eli Hastings
  • “Honeybee” by Caroline M. Yoachim
  • “The Vitruvian Farmer” by Marcelina Vizcarra

This issue was edited by Suzanne Vincent and features cover art by Rick W Ware.

Single ebooks and subscriptions are available via Weightless Books.

Support Flash Fiction Online via Patreon.

Here is the table of contents for the new issue of Galaxy’s Edge Magazine, the online/downloadable magazine edited by Mike Resnick.

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Almost ten years ago now, I picked up a copy of Stanislaw Lem’s novel Solaris and was struck at how different it was compared to a number of the other books I was reading at the time. It was an interesting and probing novel, one that I don’t think I fully understood at the time. (I still don’t).

Lem is an author who is truly uninhibited by genre convention. Last column, I looked a Ursula K. Le Guin, and have been thinking quite a bit about how science fiction authors began to put themselves into a box midway through the century when it came to ‘hard’ science fiction. Limiting a story in some regards requires one to limit one’s own imagination: after all, we’re talking about fiction, where authors can make up whatever they choose. Lem was one of the authors who could make up a considerable story and then deliver it.

Go read Stanislaw Lem and His Push For Deeper Thinking over at the Kirkus Reviews blog.

Looking for the perfect gift for the special nerdy someone?

Over at the Kirkus Reviews blog this week, I serve up a tasty helping of End-of-Summer Gift Ideas for SciFi Fans and Comic Nerds.

Kirkus,

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