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This week at the Kirkus Review blog, I get all list-y and look at some science fiction and fantasy books that might appeal to readers of classic literature.

From the article:

For some readers, science fiction and fantasy is a hard sell. The sf/f labels come with the baggage of preconceived notions about what it means. I’ve said this before, but it bears repeating: Science fiction is not always about spaceships and fantasy is not always about dragons. Science fiction and fantasy provide just as much literary range as classic literature. In fact, several works of sf/f key off of classic literature. So, with the aim of introducing readers to sf/f, here’s a list of suggestions aimed at readers of classic literature to help introduce them to the wonderful world of science fiction and fantasy.

Check out 5 Science Fiction an Fantasy Reads for Lovers of Classic Literature over on the Kirkus Reviews blog.

The Transformation of George R.R. Martin

I’ve been a fan of Game of Thrones since I first caught it a couple of years ago, and I’ve been impressed with the HBO series as I’ve continued to watch. When Season 1 hit, I pulled out my copies of A Song of Ice and Fire and started the first book, alternatively reading and watching the show. I’ve found the books to be a trial to get through, but I’ve ultimately enjoyed them.

I’ve found Martin’s rise to real fame in the last couple of years to be an interesting thing to watch, and it’s equally as interesting to look back and remember that he was a fairly prominent SF author throughout the 70s and 80s, and with this past weekend’s release of Season 4, it’s a good time to look back on his roots.

Go read The Transformation of George R.R. Martin over on the Kirkus Reviews Blog.

John Anealio and Patrick Hester discuss Patreon this week on The Functional Nerds Podcast.

Listen below, or at The Functional Nerds or subscribe to The Functional Nerds Podcast through iTunes.
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The new issue of Clarkesworld is now posted:
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Now through April 17th, Apex is running a promotion they’re calling Operation Fourth Story. They’re offering yearly subscriptions at the discounted price of $17.95 and offering a free Apex eBook to anyone who subscribes (or renews) during this period. The goal is to get enough new subscriptions (around 250) to have the revenue to add a fourth original short story to each issue of Apex Magazine. If they reach the goal, they’ll be giving away one Kindle Paperwhite to one random supporter.

Press release follows…

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This week at the Kirkus Review blog, I name my Best Bets for Speculative Fiction Reads for April 2014.

Are these the books that stoke your readerly flame, too?

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Here’s the table of contents for the new issue of Apex Magazine, a monthly science fiction, fantasy, and horror magazine featuring original, mind-bending short fiction from many of the top pros of the field.
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Lightspeed Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
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Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
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Amazing Stories announced publication of a special 88th anniversary edition of the magazine on April 1st, 2014.

Press release follows:
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The Meteoric Rise and Fall of Gnome Press

In my day job, I work with MBA students, and in the time that I’ve been doing that (and working at my regular job), I’ve gained a certain appreciation for how businesses function. When it comes to researching the column, looking at how a business functions has a certain appeal, especially since a major, unspoken element of SF History is really a sort of business history.

An excellent case in point is the rise and fall of a small, independent publisher, Gnome Press, which existed for just over a decade in the middle of the 20th Century. They published some of the genre’s greatest authors, but ultimately failed, overtaken by their own inability to sell books and by changes in the marketplace. Gnome is an interesting business to study, because it carries with it some important lessons.

Read The Meteoric Rise and Fall of Gnome Press over on the Kirkus Reviews Blog.

Science fiction, a literature that often shows with the world of tomorrow will look like, is often credited with predicting the future. But does it really?

Over at the Kirkus Reviews Blog this week, I conclude my look at preductions when I ask Science Fiction Predictions: Truth or Misconception?

Check it out.

If The Moon Were Only 1 Pixel

Scientific accuracy is one of the reason I and our bagel-loving overlord enjoyed Andy Weir’s The Martian. One of the often overlooked points of accuracy are distances; some novels minimize or ignore that vast distances of nothingness because they are difficult to comprehend…plus they mess up plot lines.

Graphics designer Josh Worth (see his page for “Creepy iOS6 Features” as well), in trying to explain these vast distances to his daughter, has created a page called “If The Moon Were Only 1 Pixel“…which uses scrolling (sometimes seemingly infinite scrolling) to depict distances and sizes in the Solar System. In a post accurately titled “A Tediously Accurate Map of the Solar System“, Josh explains his motivation.

I highly recommend looking at this site on a touch device; scrolling through the vast emptiness of space is less tedious on an iPad than hitting the scroll bar with a mouse. Check out: If The Moon Were Only 1 Pixel.

Sarah Silbert, Senior Editor for Engadget, joins John Anealio and Patrick Hester this week on The Functional Nerds Podcast.

Listen below, or at The Functional Nerds, or subscribe to The Functional Nerds Podcast through iTunes.
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Science fiction, a literature that often shows with the world of tomorrow will look like, is often credited with predicting the future. But does it really?

Over at the Kirkus Reviews Blog this week, I take a look at Science Fiction Predictions: Truth or Misconception?

Check it out.

The Innumerable Short Stories of Theodore Sturgeon

One of the stories that remains a favorite for me is Theodore Sturgeon’s “Microcosmic God”, which I tore through when I received a copy of the Science Fiction Hall of Fame way back in High School. Sturgeon became an author that I’d turn to pretty quickly whenever I picked up another anthology, and I’ve generally enjoyed all of the stories I’ve read from him.

Sturgeon is someone who’s popped up a bit in the column already, and he’s been someone I’ve been wanting to write about for a while now. He left an enormous footprint within the SF/F short fiction genre, and his work really ran counter to the largely conservative-leaning authors and stories that had been published by Campbell & imitators.

Go read The Innumerable Short Stories of Theodore Sturgeon over on the Kirkus Reviews Blog.

Science Fiction Merry-Go-Round!

One of the things I love about science fiction is the diversity of stories encompassed by the sf label. Of course, that doesn’t stop us from applying numerous, more detailed labels to categorize stories,

Over at the Kirkus Reviews Blog this week, I take a look at a slew of books on the Science Fiction Merry-Go-Round!

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There used to be a time when genre fanboys like myself would whine about the lack of films based on books. That situation has changed quite a bit.

Over at the Kirkus Reviews Blog this week, I take a look at the latest Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Adaptations.

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The new issue of Clarkesworld is now posted:
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Lightspeed Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
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