Tag Archives: Asimov’s

Table of Contents: Asimov’s, January 2015

Here’s the table of contents for the new issue of Asimov’s.
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Table of Contents: Asimov’s, December 2014

Here’s the table of contents for the new issue of Asimov’s.
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Table of Contents: Asimov’s, October/November 2014

Here’s the table of contents for the new double issue of Asimov’s.
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Table of Contents: Asimov’s, September 2014

Here’s the table of contents for the new issue of Asimov’s.
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Table of Contents: Asimov’s, August 2014

Here’s the table of contents for the new issue of Asimov’s.
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Table of Contents: Asimov’s, July 2014

Here’s the table of contents for the new issue of Asimov’s.
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Table of Contents: Asimov’s, June 2014

Here’s the table of contents for the new issue of Asimov’s.
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[GUEST POST] Fran Wilde on Staying Ahead of Evolving Technology


Fran Wilde is an author, programmer, and technology consultant who has worked as a science and engineering writer, a university professor, a sailing instructor, a game developer, and a jeweler’s assistant. Fran’s first novel, Bone Arrow, is forthcoming from Tor in 2015. Her short stories have appeared in Asimov’s, Beneath Ceaseless Skies (forthcoming), Nature, and The Impossible Futures anthology, while nonfiction interviews and roundtables writers have appeared under the banner “Cooking the Books” at Tor.com, Strange Horizons, the SFWA blog, and at franwilde.wordpress.com. You can also find Fran on twitter (as @Fran_Wilde), tumblr, and facebook.

Photo Credit: Dan Magus, 2014   
On Staying Ahead of Evolving Technology (OR: Things Fall Apart)

By Fran Wilde

Diana Rios swore she’d put the next stung brigger who entered her garrison med tent out of their misery with her bare hands.

“What possessed you to put a live wasp in your mouth, Jersey?” she asked, before tearing an antihistamine pen cap off with her teeth.

“Ith wath a beth! Ow!”

- From “Like a Wasp to the Tongue,” by Fran Wilde, Asimov’s April/May 2014.

John DeNardo invited me to talk to SF Signal readers about the sensor wasps that appear in my Asimov’s April/May 2014 short story “Like a Wasp to the Tongue,” and I’m delighted to do so.

SF writers spend a lot of time thinking about where technology is headed. In particular, we try to stay far, far ahead of where technology might be headed. It’s part of the job description. Personally, I find it a lot of fun. But it isn’t an easy sort of fun. Tech moves faster every day.

In a former life as an engineering and science writer, I learned that one way to get a jump on technology and where it could evolve is to look at the problems that technology is currently creating for itself and for its users — the holes it digs for itself, simply by virtue of its own headwind.

I’m totally getting to the wasps. Bear with me.
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Table of Contents: Asimov’s, April/May 2014

Here’s the table of contents for the new issue of Asimov’s.
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Table of Contents: Asimov’s, March 2014

Here’s the table of contents for the new issue of Asimov’s.
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Table of Contents: Asimov’s, February 2014

Here’s the table of contents for the new issue of Asimov’s.
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Table of Contents: Asimov’s, January 2014

Here’s the table of contents for the the January 2014 issue of Asimov’s (on sale now), with cover art by Alexandra Mankyan.
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Short Fiction Friday: Asimov’s Science Fiction, December 2013

REVIEW SUMMARY: This week’s Short Fiction Friday features a review of the December 2013 issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction.

MY RATING:

BRIEF SUMMARY: Aliens visiting Earth, teenage rivalry, lingerie sales, frightening creatures on other worlds, frog deformities, discrimination…a wide variety of subject matter and style exists in 2013’s final issue.

MY REVIEW:
PROS: Similar themes are examined in dissimilar fashion in a couple of the stories, offering much to provoke thought/discussion; one short selection showcases sfnal humor done well; the cover story provides the opportunity for Western readers to experience science fiction from a different culture; nonfiction offerings are engaging.
CONS: One novelette and one short story are slow-moving and overly long for the story being told, diminishing their effectiveness.
BOTTOM LINE: Science fiction comes in many forms, as this selection of stories proves. The trope of aliens visiting Earth is examined in two very different stories, one humorous and one quite serious and the theme of intra-species discrimination is also present in two of the stories and while they couldn’t be more different in tone, both offer interesting commentary on existing problems. Overall the December issue is a fine way to end the year. Two great stories, a few good and two that ultimately do not deliver opened by the kind of passionate editorial one expects from Sheila Williams and the educational article written by Robert Silverberg make this one worth picking up.

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Short Fiction Friday: Stories The Go Bump in the Night

REVIEW SUMMARY: Four recently published (or reprinted) chilling science fiction tales to read on a dark and stormy night.

MY RATING:

MY REVIEW:
PROS: Interesting comparison between classic and contemporary short sci-fright fiction; satisfying glimpses into two authors’ ongoing literary worlds; solid pacing; good examples to whet the appetite to buy the publications in which the stories are featured.
CONS: Three of the four reviewed stories undoubtedly have a greater impact if the reader is familiar with other stories written in those worlds.
BOTTOM LINE: Seasonally-appropriate science fiction tales from capable authors that work well within their word-count restraints and satisfy the reader looking for science fiction with an eerie edge.

Given that Halloween is not too far away I thought I would spend the next few Fridays featuring science fiction/fantasy shorts of the thrilling variety.  For this week’s selections I chose two stories from the recently released Baen collection In Space No One Can Hear You Scream and two from the October/November 2013 issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction.

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TOC: Asimov’s, December 2013

Here’s the table of contents for the the December 2013 issue of Asimov’s (on sale now), with cover art by Alexandra Mankyan.
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Come visit Asimov’s and Analog at the 2013 Brooklyn Book Festival This Sunday

Come visit Asimov’s Science Fiction, Analog Science Fiction and Fact, Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, and Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine at booth #119 at the Brooklyn Book Festival this Sunday, September 22, from 10 am – 6 pm!

Raffles, subscription promotions, author signings, and free issues will be ongoing and available throughout the day.

Asimov’s readers’-award-winner Robert Reed will be signing issues containing his novella “Murder Born” from 11 am – 12 pm, and one of Asimov’s favorites, Tom Purdom, will be signing his latest story from 2 – 3 pm. Representing Analog will be long-time contributing artist John Allemand, who will be signing his two new pieces from 12 – 1 pm. Popular Ellery Queen author Hilary Davidson is signing her latest story from 3 – 4 pm.

TOC: Asimov’s, October/November 2013

Here’s the table of contents for the the October/November 2013 double issue of Asimov’s, with cover art by Larissa Morais.
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TOC: Asimov’s, September 2013

Asimov’s has posted the table of contents (with samples) for the September 2013 issue:
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TOC: Asimov’s, July 2013

Asimov’s has posted the table of contents (with samples) for the July 2013 issue:
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Short Fiction Friday: Asimov’s Science Fiction, June 2013

REVIEW SUMMARY: The latest issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction contains one novella, two novelettes, and two short stories as well as poems, book reviews, a guest editorial and Robert Silverberg’s latest “Reflections”

MY RATING:

BRIEF SYNOPSIS: The June 2013 issue of Asimov’s is what every fan of short fiction hopes to find: a beautiful cover housing a handful of well-written, interesting and emotionally satisfying stories showcasing the strength of the medium.

MY REVIEW:
PROS: Each story functions well within the parameters of its length; endings that satisfy and don’t leave the reader feeling cheated; characters that draw the reader in; wide variety of story type and setting.
CONS: Fans wishing for “science” in their “science fiction” may find little to excite their interest in the four shorter works.
BOTTOM LINE: This issue of Asimov’s is a study in genre-defying contrasts: aliens that come to Earth not to invade, but to negotiate for help; would-be assassins with well-reasoned morality concerns; the beauty to be found in a life filled with tragedy.  My high expectations for authors Robert Reed and Kristine Kathyrn Rusch, long-time favorites, were mostly met and three new-to-me authors offered up equally effective stories.  This was one issue of Asimov’s that was hard to put down, leading me to read it in one very enjoyable sitting.  It is on shelves now and worth owning for the cover image alone.

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