David Wellington is an author of horror, fantasy, and thriller novels. His zombie novels Monster Island, Monster Nation and Monster Planet (Thunder’s Mouth Press) form a complete trilogy. He has also written a series of vampire novels including Thirteen Bullets, Ninety-Nine Coffins, Vampire Zero, Twenty-Three Hours, and 32 Fangs. His werewolf series comprises Frostbite” and “Overwinter, known in the UK as “Cursed and Ravaged. In 2004 he began serializing his horror fiction online, posting short chapters of a novel three times a week on a friend’s blog. Response to the project was so great that in 2004 Thunder’s Mouth Press approached Mr. Wellington about publishing “Monster Island as a print book. His novels have been featured in Rue Morgue, Fangoria, and the New York Times.

David kindly answered a few of my questions about his new book, The Hydra Protocol (Jim Chapel)!


Kristin Centorcelli: David, congrats on your new book, THE HYDRA PROTOCOL! Will you tell us a little about yourself and your background? Have you always wanted to be a writer?

David Wellington: Oh, man, yeah. Since I was six years old. Basically when I started reading books, my initial reaction was “I can do better than this.” I was wrong, but it took me years to find out why, and more years to figure out how to come close. Hi! I’m David Wellington. I’m a novelist. I wrote a bunch of horror novels and now I’m working on a thriller series, with a science fiction kind of angle on it.
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Zack Parsons is a Chicago-area writer known for his acerbic humor at Something Awful, his non-fiction books like My Tank is Fight! and his contributions to various compilations. His debut sci-fi novelLiminal States, described by author Cory Doctorow as “vivid, and relentless, masterfully plotted,” was released April of 2012.

Book, with Occasional Music

When I set out to write my genre-spanning debut novel, Liminal States, I wanted to music to shape the outcome of my creative process. Ending with a free downloadable companion soundtrack from my friend, Conelrad, was something I hoped would excite readers and enhance their experience.

Listening to music while writing was vital for me. It allowed me to shut out what was going on, no matter where I was at the time, and depending on the music, it could serve as an inspiration for what I was writing. My obsession with scoring every moment made me curious about how more experienced authors of speculative fiction use music.

So I asked.
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