Tag Archives: Fun With Friends

Fun with Friends: Helen Lowe Talks with Freya Robertson, Author of HEARTWOOD


About the Series:
Fun with Friends is an SF Signal interview series in which I feature fellow SFF authors from Australia and New Zealand. The format is one interview per month, with no more than five questions per interview, focusing on “who the author is” and “what she/he does” in writing terms. This month’s guest is Freya Robertson.

Freya Robertson is a lifelong fan of science fiction and fantasy, as well as a dedicated gamer. She has a deep and abiding fascination for the history and archaeology of the middle ages and spent many hours as a teenager writing out notecards detailing the battles of the Wars of the Roses, or moping around museums looking at ancient skeletons, bits of rusted iron and broken pots.

She has published over twenty romance novels under other pseudonyms and won prizes in fifteen short story and poetry competitions. Freya lives in the glorious country of New Zealand Aotearoa, where the countryside was made to inspire fantasy writers and filmmakers, and where they brew the best coffee in the world.

To find out more about Freya, you can find her on her website or her blog, or follow her on Facebook and Twitter (as @EpicFreya).


Helen: Freya, Heartwood is your debut Fantasy novel, which you’ve described to me as a traditional, quest-based epic fantasy. What do you feel makes it fresh for readers?
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Fun with Friends: Helen Lowe Talks with Gillian Polack


About the Series:
Fun with Friends is an SF Signal interview series in which I feature fellow SFF authors from Australia and New Zealand. The format is one interview per month, with no more than five questions per interview, focusing on “who the author is” and “what she/he does” in writing terms. This month’s guest is Gillian Polack.

Gillian Polack is based in Canberra, Australia. She is mainly a writer, editor and educator. Her most recent print publications are a novel (Ms Cellophane, Momentum, 2012), an anthology (Masques, CSfG Publishing, 2009, co-edited with Scott Hopkins), some short stories and a slew of articles. Her newest anthology is Baggage, published by Eneit Press (2010) and about to be reprinted. One of her short stories won a Victorian Ministry of the Arts award a long time ago, and three have (more recently) been listed as recommended reading in international lists of world’s best fantasy and science fiction short stories such as the Datlow/Link/Grant Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror series. She received a Macquarie Bank Fellowship and a Blue Mountains Fellowship to work on novels at Varuna, an Australian writers’ residence in the Blue Mountains. Gillian has a doctorate in Medieval history from the University of Sydney and one in English (pending) from the University of Western Australia. Contact Gillian on Twitter @GillianPolack, on Facebook at Gillian Polack and on Live Journal at gillpolack. Her webpage needs updating (but not as much as her Wikipedia page) and is untrustworthy, but is at GillianPolack.com.
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Fun with Friends: Helen Lowe Talks with Ian Irvine


About the Series:
Fun with Friends is an SF Signal interview series in which I feature fellow SFF authors from Australia and New Zealand. The format is one interview per month, with no more than five questions per interview, focusing on “who the author is” and “what she/he does” in writing terms. This month’s guest is Ian Irvine.

Ian Irvine, a marine scientist who has developed some of Australia’s national guidelines for protection of the marine environment, has also written 29 novels. These include the bestselling Three Worlds fantasy sequence (The View from the Mirror, The Well of Echoes and Song of the Tears), a trilogy of eco-thrillers, and 12 books for younger readers. Ian’s latest fantasy novel is Rebellion, Book 2 of The Tainted Realm trilogy. He is currently editing Book 3, Justice. Ian’s website is ian-irvine.com.


Helen: Ian, you are a scientist currently writing epic fantasy. Do you find the science informs the epic, for example with world building, or are the two parallel but separate realms?
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Fun with Friends – Helen Lowe Talks with Fellow Authors from Australia and New Zealand: Today’s Guest Is Karen Healey

About the Series:
“Fun with Friends” is an SF Signal interview series in which I feature fellow SFF authors from Australia and New Zealand. The format is one interview per month, with no more than five questions per interview, focusing on “who the author is” and “what she/he does” in writing terms.

Introducing Karen Healey:

Karen Healey is the award-winning author of young adult urban fantasies Guardian of the Dead and The Shattering, and the forthcoming cryonic Sleeping Beauty tale, When We Wake. She technically lives in New Zealand, but actually lives on the Internet. You can find her there at www.karenhealey.com


Interview With Karen Healey

Helen: In the time I’ve known you, you’ve lived in Australia and New Zealand—as well as on the internet—but your new novel When We Wake is set in Australia, whereas Guardian of the Dead and The Shattering have New Zealand locales. Was there something about an Australian setting you felt particularly suited this story?

Karen: For the purposes of my story, I needed the setting of a future world superpower. Now, I think New Zealand certainly ought to be a world superpower, because it is the best country in the world, bar none. But alas, I don’t think it’s going to reach the status that it deserves in a mere hundred years.

Australia it was! The setting, of course, influenced the concerns of the story in its turn as I considered the likely landscape and resources of Australia in the future, and what kind of historical events would lead to an Australian superpower (like the collapse of the USA during a series of secessionist Fundamentalist Wars. Sorry, American readers!)

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Fun with Friends—Helen Lowe Talks with Fellow Authors from Australia and New Zealand: Today’s Guest Is Marianne de Pierres

About the Series:
“Fun with Friends” is an SF Signal interview series in which I feature fellow SFF authors from Australia and New Zealand. The format is one interview per month, with no more than five questions per interview, focusing on “who the author is” and “what she/he does” in writing terms.

Introducing Mariane de Pierres:

Marianne de Pierres is the author of the acclaimed Parrish Plessis and award-winning Sentients of Orion science fiction series. The Parrish Plessis series has been translated into eight languages and adapted into a Role Playing Game. She is also the Davitt award-winning author of the humorous Tara Sharp crime series, written under the pseudonym Marianne Delacourt, and the Night Creatures teen dark fantasy trilogy. In 2013 her Sentients of Orion SF series has become available to North American readers for the first time.

Marianne is an active supporter of genre fiction and has mentored many writers. She lives in Brisbane, Australia, with her husband, three sons and three galahs. To find out more about Marianne’s writing, visit her websites at www.mariannedepierres.com, and www.burnbright.com.au and www.tarasharp.com. You can also follow Marianne on Twitter: @mdepierres


Interview With Marianne de Pierres

Helen: Marianne, with three SFF series to your name—the “Parrish Plessis” (near future dystopia) books, the “Sentients of Orion” (space opera) series, and “Burn Bright” (dystopian YA)—you obviously love science fiction. When did that love begin and how did it develop?

Marianne:  Hi Helen! I’d never read science fiction until I was in my twenties, though I had grown up with Doctor Who. Once I discovered Arthur C. Clarke though, there was no going back. I read SF steadily for several years. Then in my thirties I spent time reading endless fantasy sagas. When I’d gorged myself there, I returned to space opera. While I read a lot more crime these days, there are certain SF authors I must always have. Ian MacDonald heads that list.

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Fun with Friends—Helen Lowe Talks with Fellow Authors from Australia and New Zealand: Today’s Guest Is Stephen Minchin

About the Series:
“Fun with Friends” is an SF Signal interview series in which I feature fellow SFF authors from Australia and New Zealand. The format is one interview per month, with no more than five questions per interview, focusing on “who the author is” and “what she/he does” in writing terms.

Introducing Stephen Minchin:

Stephen Minchin is the publisher at Steam Press, a small press specializing in speculative fiction that has been operating since 2011. Stephen’s background is in the sciences, but after working for a horticultural consultancy company for seven years he realized that he would far rather retrain and get into publishing. He now works for a number of independent publishers in Wellington, New Zealand, where he focuses on digital production and drinking vast quantities of coffee. Steam Press released three books in 2012: The Prince of Soul and The Lighthouse by Fredrik Brouneus (which has now sold into Germany and the Czech Republic); Mansfield with Monsters by Katherine Mansfield with Matt and Debbie Cowens (which was one of the New Zealand Listener’s top 100 books of 2012); and Tropic of Skorpeo by Michael Morrissey (which is so bonkers that no one seems to know quite what to make of it.)

Photo by Jane Harris.

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Fun with Friends—Helen Lowe Talks with Fellow Authors from Australia and New Zealand: Today’s Guest Is Elizabeth Knox


About the Series:

“Fun with Friends” is an SF Signal interview series in which I feature fellow SFF authors from Australia and New Zealand. The format is one interview per month, with no more than five questions per interview, focusing on “who the author is” and “what she/he does” in writing terms.

This month for my “Fun with (Australian & New Zealand) Friends” series, I’m talking with New Zealand author, Elizabeth Knox, best known for The Vintner’s Luck (1998), The Dreamhunter DuetDreamhunter (2005) and Dreamquake (2007). Elizabeth Knox has been a full time writer since 1997 and has published ten novels, three autobiographical novellas and a collection of essays. Her best known books are The Vintner’s Luck (1998), and The Dreamhunter DuetDreamhunter (2005) and Dreamquake (2007). The Vintner’s Luck has won numerous awards, been published in seven languages and made into a film of the same name, directed by Niki Caro. Dreamquake, the second in her Dreamhunter Duet, was a prestigious Michael L Printz Award Honor book in 2008. Creating worlds began early for Elizabeth in the imaginary games she played with her two sisters. By the time she was eleven the games had become one game, an on-going saga set in another world, a game she shared with her sisters and several friends. One day, her father interrupted a discussion the girls were having about the possible results of a secret treaty, by saying, “I hope you’re writing some of this down.” Elizabeth, her sisters and a friend began writing letters between their characters, and stories about them. Elizabeth enjoyed writing and decided that this – writing fiction – was what she wanted to do with her life. She went on to graduate from New Zealand’s Victoria University with a degree in English Literature and has become one of New Zealand’s most successful fiction authors. Elizabeth lives in Wellington, New Zealand with her husband, Fergus Barrowman, her son, Jack, and three cats. You can find out more about Elizabeth Knox and her writing on her website, here.

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Fun with Friends—Helen Lowe Talks with Fellow Authors from Australia and New Zealand: Today’s Guest Is Adam Christopher

About the Series:

“Fun with Friends” is an SF Signal interview series in which I feature fellow SFF authors from Australia and New Zealand. The format is one interview per month, with no more than five questions per interview, focusing on “who the author is” and “what she/he does” in writing terms.

This month’s guest is Adam Christopher, a New Zealand author now based in the UK,whose first novel, Empire State (Angry Robot, 2011), received a very positive reception. His second novel, Seven Wonders (Angry Robot, 2012), is new out.

Allow me to introduce Adam Christopher:
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Fun with Friends—Helen Lowe Talks with Fellow Authors from Australia and New Zealand: Today’s Guest Is Jane Higgins

About the Series:

“Fun with Friends” is an SF Signal interview series in which I feature fellow SFF authors from Australia and New Zealand. The format is one interview per month, with no more than five questions per interview, focusing on “who the author is” and “what she/he does” in writing terms.

This month’s guest is Jane Higgins, a New Zealand YA author whose first novel, the future dystopia The Bridge was published in 2011 to critical and popular acclaim.

Allow me to introduce Jane Higgins:

Jane was born, raised, and still resides in Christchurch, New Zealand, where she works as a social science academic, primarily researching on how young people craft identities and create pathways from school to their post-school lives. Growing up in Canterbury, the big skies inspired her love of astronomy and space travel, and she was drawn to the strange worlds of myth, science fiction and fantasy, especially stories by Arthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, J.R.R. Tolkien and Ursula Le Guin.  A few years ago she decided to try writing fiction and wrote a futuristic war story in which the central characters are young people crossing borders and working out where they belong. This initial story, which became The Bridge went on to win the 2010 Text Prize for Young Adult and Children’s Writing and was both a New Zealand Post Children’s Book Awards’ Honor Book, and also “Children’s Choice” book in the YA category, in 2012.  Jane still works as a researcher with young people, still reads, still writes (and still watches Dr. Who.)  She is currently working on a sequel to The Bridge.

To find about more about Jane, see her website, here.


An Interview With Jane Higgins

Helen: The Bridge is future dystopian SF, currently a very popular genre for YA readers, although I suspect that’s not why you wrote it. So why, then: why future dystopia and why YA?

Jane: Why YA? They say you write the books you love to read. I’ve always loved reading, but I think the time in my life when reading was most magical, and when I was most able to get completely lost in a book, was when I was a teenager. I can still remember vividly how I felt reading some of my favourite books back then. I can remember where I was when I read the first page of Le Guin’s A Wizard of Earthsea (in my school library) and when I read the last page of The Lord of the Rings (by gaslight in my parents’ cabin in the mountains of Canterbury). So when I decided to try writing fiction, I gravitated towards the type of story that I loved most when I was growing up.

Why future dystopia? I wanted to write about some young people caught up in a war, as so many are around the world at present. But I didn’t want to import into the story all the current context of a particular war. So I made one up. To do that I took some current trends and pushed them a couple of hundred years into the future. I didn’t sit down and think: “ok, I’m going to write a dystopia,” but it’s not too surprising that when you project trends like global conflict and climate change into the future, things do look fairly grim. But it’s not all grim! I hope that readers find that the book is also about the way friendship and simple human decency make it possible to navigate those challenges.

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Fun with Friends—Helen Lowe Talks with Fellow Authors from Australia and New Zealand: Today’s Guest is Tim Jones

About the Series:

“Fun with Friends” is an SF Signal interview series in which I feature fellow SFF authors from Australia and New Zealand. The format is one interview per month, with no more than five questions per interview, focusing on “who the author is” and “what she/he does” in writing terms.

Today’s guest, Tim Jones, is well established in New Zealand as an author, poet, editor and blogger, but perhaps not so well known beyond its borders – although as his bio and the interview may hint, I suspect that is starting to change amongst the discerning. Either way though, I am pretty sure that followers of speculative fiction will find plenty about Tim and his work that is of interest.

Allow me to introduce Tim Jones:

Tim Jones is a poet and author of both science fiction and literary fiction who was awarded the New Zealand Society of Authors Janet Frame Memorial Award for Literature in 2010. He lives in Wellington, New Zealand. Among his recent books are fantasy novel Anarya’s Secret (RedBrick, 2007), short story collection Transported (Vintage, 2008), and poetry anthology Voyagers: Science Fiction Poetry from New Zealand (Interactive Press, 2009), co-edited with Mark Pirie. Voyagers won the “Best Collected Work” category in the 2010 Sir Julius Vogel Awards, and has been selected for the “Books On New Zealand” exhibition at the 2012 Frankfurt Book Fair. Tim’s most recent book is his third poetry collection, Men Briefly Explained, published by Interactive Press (IP) in late 2011. He is currently working on his third short story collection. His story The New Neighbours appears in The Apex Book of World SF 2, edited by Lavie Tidhar (2012).

For more, see Tim’s Amazon author page (which contains links to Tim’s individual books) and his blog, Book In The Trees.


Helen: Tim, you immigrated to New Zealand at an early age from the UK. How do you consider that experience has influenced your perceptions and approach as a New Zealand author?

Tim: I think it’s had a big effect on my writing – after all, my first collection was titled Boat People and a number of the poems in it dealt with how emigrating affected my mother, my father and me, while my second short story collection, Transported, is all about journeys of one sort or another. Looking back, I am amazed by how many of my short stories feature journeys by or over water! (I was clearly never cut out to write vampire fiction.)

But on a wider level, the experience of being an alien is an excellent grounding for writing about the alien. As a child in rural Southland[1], whose ears stood out as much as his pronounced Northern English accent, my failed efforts to fit in at school in my new country certainly provided plenty of fodder for alienation. There are a lot of outsiders in my early stories: now, I’m more likely to write about people who might appear to the outside world to be insiders, but are still all too well aware of their difference from those around them.

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