Suvudu has posted the table of contents for the upcoming (June 17, 2014) 832-page anthology Rogues edited by George R.R. Martin and Gardner Dozois:

Here’s the book description:

A thrilling collection of twenty-one original stories by an all-star list of contributors—including a new A Game of Thrones story by George R. R. Martin!

The latest story collection from #1 New York Times bestselling author George R. R. Martin and award-winning editor Gardner Dozois is filled with subtle shades of gray. Twenty-one all-original stories, by an all-star list of contributors, will delight and astonish you in equal measure with their cunning twists and dazzling reversals. And George R. R. Martin himself offers a brand-new A Game of Thrones tale chronicling one of the biggest rogues in the entire Ice and Fire saga.

Follow along with the likes of Gillian Flynn, Joe Abercrombie, Neil Gaiman, Patrick Rothfuss, Scott Lynch, Cherie Priest, Garth Nix, and Connie Willis as well as other masters of literary sleight-of-hand in this rogues’ gallery of stories that will plunder your heart—and yet leave you all the richer for it.

Here’s the table of contents…
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UPDATE: Free fiction links added, thanks to Sense of Wonder.

Gardner Dozois has posted the impressive table of contents for his upcoming anthology The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Thirty-First Annual Collection:

First, the book description:
[UPDATED to remove names from the description that are not in the final TOC]

The multiple Locus Award-winning annual compilation of the year’s best science fiction stories

In the new millennium, what secrets lay beyond the far reaches of the universe? What mysteries belie the truths we once held to be self evident? The world of science fiction has long been a porthole into the realities of tomorrow, blurring the line between life and art. Now, in The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Thirty-First Annual Collection the very best SF authors explore ideas of a new world. This venerable collection brings together award winning authors and masters of the field such as Robert Reed, Alastair Reynolds, Damien Broderick, Elizabeth Bear, [and] Paul McAuley and John Barnes. And with an extensive recommended reading guide and a summation of the year in science fiction, this annual compilation has become the definitive must-read anthology for all science fiction fans and readers interested in breaking into the genre.

Here’s the table of contents…
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Here’s the the cover art and synopsis of the upcoming anthology The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Thirty-First Annual Collection edited by Gardner Dozois, arriving in July 2014.

There’s a much larger cover after the jump. This is the same excellent Jim Burns artwork that was used on the cover of Interzone #245.

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Subterranean Press has announced that they are taking pre-orders for has posted the tribute anthology The Book of Silverberg edited by Gardner Dozois and William Schafer and featuring a dust jacket illustration by Tomasz Maronski.

Here’s the book description:

For nearly sixty years, Grandmaster Robert Silverberg has been a significant presence in the world of science fiction. As prolific as he is gifted, Silverberg has amassed a body of work unique both in its richness and its variety. That work has influenced generations of other writers and has enriched the lives of untold numbers of devoted readers.

In The Book of Silverberg, editors Gardner Dozois and William Schafer have assembled a tribute anthology fully worthy of the Master himself. The book begins with a pair of affectionate appreciations from Greg Bear and Barry Malzberg, and continues with a series of wonderfully original stories that inhabit and extend some of Silverberg’s most memorable creations. In “In Old Pidruid,” the late Kage Baker turns to the world of Majipoor in a humorous and moving tale of rivalry and reconciliation. Kristine Kathryn Rusch’s “Voyeuristic Tendencies” shows us the world of the 1972 novel Dying Inside from a wholly different perspective. Nancy Kress’s “Eaters” provides a bleak and harrowing conclusion to the classic short story “Sundance.” In “Silverberg, Satan, and Me or Where I Got the Idea for My Silverberg Story for This Anthology,” the incomparable Connie Willis offers what might be the only plausible explanation for the whole Silverberg phenomenon. And elsewhere in the anthology, some of today’s most notable writers—Mike Resnick, Caitlin R. Kiernan, Elizabeth Bear, James Patrick Kelly, and Tobias S. Buckell—ring equally brilliant changes on a number of Silverberg’s signature fictions.

Funny, tragic, provocative, intelligent and always richly imagined, the stories in The Book of Silverberg are all notable accomplishments in themselves. Together, they comprise an exhilarating—and altogether fitting—celebration of one of science fiction’s indisputable masters.

Limited: 250 numbered copies, bound in leather, signed by all contributors but Kage Baker
Trade: Fully cloth bound hardcover edition

Here’s the table of contents…
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REVIEW SUMMARY: 7 standout stories + 18 good stories – 4 stories mediocre or worse = a good collection on par with previous editions.

MY RATING:

BRIEF SYNOPSIS: Editor Gardner Dozois’ picks for the twenty-nine best science fiction stories of 2012.

MY REVIEW:
PROS: 25 stories worth reading, 7 of which were outstanding; exposure to new writers and writing styles; the multitude of ideas.
CONS: A small handful of stories just didn’t do it for me.
BOTTOM LINE: A worthwhile anthology providing a good snapshot of the year in science fiction for 2012.

The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Thirtieth Annual Collection is the 2013 edition showcasing editor Gardner Dozois’ picks for the twenty-nine best sf stories of 2012. The newest edition — See also my reviews of previous editions: #19, #20, #21, #22, #23, #24, #25, #26, #27, #28, and #29 — is just as enjoyable as past volumes, which is to say that some stories will be enjoyed more than others. But as I’ve stated before, the benefit of short fiction is more than just enjoying the story, it’s sampling new writers and being exposed to new ideas and writing styles — and this volume scores big on that front.

That said, some stories did work better for me. The best in this anthology were:
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George R.R. Martin has posted the table of contents for the upcoming anthology he co-edited with Gardner Dozois, Old Venus. This is a follow up to another upcoming anthology, Old Mars. Martin says “Gardner and I wish to categorically deny the rumor that we are now working on OLD URANUS”. Hiyo!

Here’s the table of contents…
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Gardner Dozois, one of the most acclaimed editors in science-fiction, has won the Hugo Award for Best Editor 15 times. He was the editor of Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine for 20 years. He is the editor of the Year’s Best Science Fiction anthologies and co-editor of the Warrior anthologies, Songs of the Dying Earth, and many others. As a writer, Dozois twice won the Nebula Award for best short story. He lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The 30th annual collection of The Year’s Best Science Fiction will be out this month, and Mr. Dozois was kind enough to answer a few of my questions about the new collection, his career, and more!


Kristin Centorcelli: You’ve won an unprecedented 15 Hugo Awards for Best Editor during your career, and the 30th volume of The Year’s Best Science Fiction will be out this month! I read that reading slush for magazines started you on the road to editing…did you ever imagine it would come this far?
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George R.R. Martin has posted the table of contents for his the upcoming anthology he co-edited with Gardner Dozois. It’s called Rogues and is their latest of “big cross-genre anthologies”:

Says Martin:

This one was an enormous amount of fun. We’re got something for everyone in ROGUES — SF, mystery, historical fiction, epic fantasy, sword and sorcery, comedy, tragedy, crime stories, mainstream. And rogues, cads, scalawags, con men, thieves, and scoundrels of all descriptions. If you love Harry Flashman and Cugel the Clever, as I do, this is the book for you.

If there’s any bloody justice, some of these stories will contend for awards.

Check out the star-studded table of contents:
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REVIEW SUMMARY: 8 standout stories + 24 good stories – 3 stories mediocre or worse = a collection on par with previous editions.

MY RATING:

BRIEF SYNOPSIS: Editor Gardner Dozois’ picks for the thirty-five best stories of 2011.

MY REVIEW:
PROS: 30 stories worth reading, 7 of which were outstanding. Being exposed to new writers and a rapid-fire stream of ideas as compared with novel-length stories.
CONS: 3 stories didn’t strike me as qualifying for “best”.
BOTTOM LINE: A valuable anthology providing a snapshot of the year 2011 in sf.

Why, yes, I am way behind in my short fiction reading, thank you!

The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Twenty-Ninth Annual Collection is the 2012 edition showcasing editor Gardner Dozois’ picks for the thirty-five best sf stories of 2011. The newest edition (See also my reviews of previous editions: #19, #20, #21, #22, #23, #24, #25, #26, #27 and #28) is about on par with previous editions, which is to say that some stories are more enjoyable than others. But the benefit of short fiction goes deeper than overall quality; it is the exposure to new ideas, new writers, and new writing styles coming at the reader faster than happens at novel length that is the true power of short fiction. But some stories have to stand out for any reader. For me they were:
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George R.R. Martin has posted the table of contents for the upcoming all-original retro-SF anthology he co-edited with Gardner Dozois, Old Mars, coming in October:
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Gardner Dozois has announced the contents for the upcoming anthology The Year’s Best Science Fiction, Thirtieth Annual Collection, releasing on July 23, 2013:
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TOC: ‘Rip-Off!’ Edited by Gardner Dozois

Audible has posted the table of contents for the audio anthology Rip-Off!, available later this month. The cover will be one of the three shown here, as voted on Audible’s facebook page.

Here’s the audiobook description:

In Rip-Off!, 13 of today’s best and most-honored writers of speculative fiction face a challenge even they would be hard-pressed to conceive: pick your favorite opening line from a classic piece of fiction (or even non-fiction) – then use it as the first sentence of an entirely original short story.

In the world of Rip-Off!, “Call me Ishmael” introduces a tough-as-nails private eye – who carries a harpoon; The Wonderful Wizard of Oz inspires the tale of an aging female astronaut who’s being treated by a doctor named – Dorothy Gale; and Huckleberry Finn leads to a wild ride with a foul-mouthed riverboat captain who plies the waters of Hell.

Once you listen to Rip-Off! you’ll agree: If Shakespeare or Dickens were alive today, they’d be ripping off the authors in this great collection.

As a bonus, the authors introduce their stories, explaining what they ripped-off – and why.

Rip-Off! was produced in partnership with SFWA – Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America. Gardner Dozois served as project editor.

The stories included in Rip-Off! are:
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[Today's Mind Meld was suggested by an SF Signal reader, Gary Farber, who is here among our guests. Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]

In the past couple of years, we have seen the appearance of at the least two important biographies of Science Fiction writers, the first volume of Robert Patterson’s work on Robert A. Heinlein (Robert A. Heinlein: In Dialogue with His Century: Volume 1 (1907-1948): Learning Curve) and Listen to the Echoes: The Ray Bradbury Interviews, a sort of complement to Weller’s biography, published in 2006. But there are so many writers out there, living and dead, whose lives we would have loved to know a bit more so we maybe could feel the same feeling of closeness we use to feel when we are reading their stories.

So, we asked this week’s panelists…

Q: Which figure in the history of the creation of science fiction, living or dead, would you most like to see the next thorough biography of?

Here’s what they said…

John Joseph Adams
John Joseph Adams is the bestselling editor of many anthologies, such as Other Worlds Than These, Armored, Under the Moons of Mars: New Adventures on Barsoom, Brave New Worlds, Wastelands, The Living Dead, The Living Dead 2, By Blood We Live, Federations, The Improbable Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, and The Way of the Wizard. John is a four-time finalist for the Hugo Award and the World Fantasy Award, and he has been called “the reigning king of the anthology world” by Barnes & Noble. John is also the editor of Lightspeed Magazine and the new horror magazine, Nightmare, which launches October 1. In addition to his editorial projects, John is the co-host of Wired.com’s The Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast. His next anthology, Epic: Legends of Fantasy, comes out in November. Forthcoming in December is a revised and expanded second edition of his critically-acclaimed anthology, Brave New Worlds, and then, in February, Tor will publish his anthology The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination. For more information, visit his website at johnjosephadams.com, and you can find him on Twitter @johnjosephadams.

I’d love to see a biography of Alfred Bester. I don’t know if his life was interesting enough to warrant one, but I do know that he left his literary estate to his bartender when he died, and anyone who does something like that had to have had SOME good real-life stories. (Apparently the bartender didn’t know what to do with the estate, and as a result Bester’s work was out of print for several years, until Byron Preiss rescued it and brought it back to light in the 90s.) Bester also wrote Green Lantern for a while, and created the oft-quoted Green Lantern oath, when he was writing the comic, though I don’t know if there would be any interesting stories surrounding that or his time writing comics. A few years ago, I went on a big Bester kick — I’d gone back to read though his ouvre more completely, and re-read The Stars My Destination (my favorite novel). Then, sometime later, I read the brilliant Tiptree biography by Julie Phillips, and that’s when I first conceived of this desire to read a Bester biography. Given there wasn’t one, I went on a bit of a scavenger hunt, tracking down all the information about Bester I could find, not just online, but in old magazines and the like–looking for interviews or anything that talked about the man himself, as opposed to just his fiction. I never did find much indication that there’d be enough good material to make a biography, but still I wish there was one (or perhaps that Bester had been as interesting in life as his fiction was).

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George R.R. Martin has posted the table of contents for the upcoming anthology Old Mars he co-edited with Gardner Dozois. It’s just been delivered to the publisher (Bantam), so not much more is known…but here’s what we do know about the anthology gleaned from George’s post:

OLD MARS is a new anthology of science fiction and fantasy stories about Old Mars (not the real post-Mariner Mars, but the one we all loved as kids, with the canals and the dead cities and the various flavors of Martian).

The anthology will feature fifteen original, never-before-published short stories and novelettes, story notes and author intros by Gardner Dozois, and an introduction by George R.R. Martin.

Here’s the table of contents…
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You may remember from earlier this year that the first two volumes of The Year’s Best Science Fiction anthology series edited by Gardner Dozois have been released as eBooks. Now, word comes that St. Martin’s is releasing the entire anthology series as eBooks in October 2012. This includes the The Best Of The Best:20 Years Of The Best super-anthology.

Bonus: They are also releasing electronic version of Gardner’s other anthologies Modern Classics Of Fantasy, The Good Old Stuff, and The Good New Stuff.

From a St. Martin’s press release:
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Gardner Dozois has posted on his facebook page that he has just released his long out-of-print anthologies The Year’s Best Science Fiction, First Annual Collection and The Year’s Best Science Fiction, Second Annual Collection to the Amazon Kindle store. And you can get them for just under $7 each. That’s a steal.

My first two Best anthologies from St. Martin’s, THE YEAR’S BEST SCIENCE FICTION, FIRST ANNUAL COLLECTION and THE YEAR’S BEST SCIENCE FICTION, SECOND ANNUAL COLLECTION, are now available in Kindle editions. These are extremely hard editions to find in print, people have been asking me at cons for decades how they can find them, and I’ve seen them selling for hundreds and even thousands of dollars–so if you ever wanted to read them, the start of my long-running Best of the Year series (soon up to its Twenty-Ninth Annual Edition, which will out in July), this is probably your best chance.

So run out and buy these in a buying frenzy. Buy them as presents for friends. Buy them as gifts for your pets. If they sell well enough in Kindle format, I may be able to convince the publisher that they should make other old, long-out-of-print volumes in the series available in that format as well.

This is great news. I’ve already told the story of how I came to own a physical copy of the first annual collection, now I can get a copy of the missing second annual collection.

Tables of contents follow…
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REVIEW SUMMARY: On par with previous editions with 7 standout stories + 23 good stories – 3 stories mediocre or worse.

MY RATING:

BRIEF SYNOPSIS: Editor Gardner Dozois’ picks for the thirty-three best stories of 2010.

MY REVIEW:
PROS: 30 stories worth reading, 7 of which were outstanding.
CONS: 3 stories were less enjoyable.
BOTTOM LINE: A worthwhile anthology that captures the state of modern sf.

Continuing what appears to be a disturbing emerging trend to this short fiction reader, I’m late to the party in reading this anthology essential to anyone wishing to get a glimpse into the current state of sf. The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Twenty-Eighth Annual Collection is the 2011 edition that showcases editor Gardner Dozois’ picks for the thirty-three best sf stories of 2010. Here it is 2012 and I’ve only now finished it. In some alternate universe, John-Prime is reading all the books and stories that I want to read.

Be that as it may, the story selection for the 28th edition is on-par, quality-wise, with previous editions. (See my reviews of previous editions: #19, #20, #21, #22, #23, #24, #25, #26, and #27.) Although I found three stories hovering in the mediocre range (and some of them the longest stories in this anthology), I also found seven stories to be superb. Those standout stories are:

  • “The Emperor of Mars” by Allen M. Steele
  • “The Things” by Peter Watts
  • “Flying in the Face of God” by Nina Allan
  • “Seven Years from Home” by Naomi Novik
  • “Amaryllis” by Carrie Vaughn
  • “Again and Again and Again” by Rachel Swirsky
  • “My Father’s Singularity” by Brenda Cooper
  • “Sleepover” by Alastair Reynolds

Individual story reviews follow…
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Subterranean Press has posted the table of contents for the upcoming all-original anthology being published this Fall…Multiverse: Exploring Poul Anderson’s Worlds edited by Greg Bear and Gardner Dozois, which celebrates the SF Grandmaster’s works with new stories by modern masters of the form. The cover is by Bob Eggleton.

  1. “Outmoded Things” by Nancy Kress
  2. “The Man Who Came Late” by Harry Turtledove
  3. “A Slip in Time” by S. M. Stirling
  4. “Living and Working with Poul Anderson” by Karen Anderson
  5. “Dancing on The Edge of The Dark” by C. J. Cherryh
  6. “The Lingering Joy” by Stephen Baxter
  7. “Operation Xibalba” by Eric Flint
  8. “Tales Told” by Astrid Anderson Bear
  9. “The Fey of Cloudmoor” by Terry Brooks
  10. “Christmas in Gondwanaland” by Robert Silverberg
  11. “Latecomers” by David Brin
  12. “An Appreciation of Poul Anderson” by Jerry Pournelle
  13. “A Candle” by Raymond E. Feist
  14. “The Far End” by Larry Niven
  15. “Bloodpride”” by Gregory Benford
  16. “Three Lilies and Three Leopards (And a Participation Ribbon in Science)” by Tad Williams

George R.R. Martin has posted the table of contents to Songs of Love and Death: Tales of Star-Crossed Love, a cross-genre anthologies that he co-edited with Gardner Dozois that bends stories of fantasy, science fiction, and romance:

  1. “Love Hurts” by Jim Butcher [a Harry Dresden story]
  2. “The Marrying Maid” by Jo Beverly
  3. “Rooftops” by Carrie Vaughn
  4. “Hurt Me” by M.L.N. Hanover
  5. “Demon Lover” by Cecelia Holland
  6. “The Wayfarer’s Advice” by Melinda M. Snodgrass [an Imperials story]
  7. “Blue Boots” by Robin Hobb
  8. “The Thing About Cassandra” by Neil Gaiman
  9. “After the Blood” by Marjorie M. Liu
  10. “You and You Alone” by Jacqueline Carey [a Kushiel story]
  11. “His Wolf” by Lisa Tuttle
  12. “Courting Trouble” by Linnea Sinclair
  13. “The Demon Dancer” by Mary Jo Putney
  14. “Under/Above the Water” by Tanith Lee
  15. “Kashkia” by Peter S. Beagle
  16. “Man in the Mirror” by Yasmine Galenorn
  17. “A Leaf on the Wind of All Hallows” by Diana Gabaldon [an Outlander story]

Editor Gardner Dozois has released the table of contents for The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Twenty-Seventh Annual Collection, slated for a July 2010 release:

  1. “Utriusque Cosmi” by Robert Charles Wilson (New Space Opera 2)
  2. “A Story, With Beans” by Steven Gould (Analog)
  3. Under The Shouting Sky” by Karl Bunker (Cosmos)
  4. “Events Preceding the Helvetican Revolution” by John Kessel (New Space Opera 2)
  5. “Useless Things” by Maureen F. McHugh (Eclipse Three)
  6. “Black Swan” by Bruce Sterling (Interzone)
  7. Crimes and Glory” by Paul McAuley (Subterranean)
  8. Seventh Fall” by Alexander Irvine (Subterranean)
  9. “Butterfly Bomb” by Dominic Green (Interzone)
  10. “Infinites” by Vandana Singh (The Woman Who Thought She Was a Planet)
  11. Things Undone” by John Barnes (Jim Baen’s Universe)
  12. On The Human Plan” by Jay Lake (Lone Star Stories)
  13. “The Island” by Peter Watts (New Space Opera 2)
  14. The Integrity of the Chain” by Lavie Tidhar (Fantasy)
  15. “Lion Walk” by Mary Rosenblum (Asimov’s)
  16. Escape to Other Worlds with Science Fiction” by Jo Walton (Tor.com)
  17. “Three Leaves of Aloe” by Rand B. Lee (F&SF)
  18. “Mongoose” by Elizabeth Bear & Sarah Monette (Lovecraft Unbound)
  19. “Paradiso Lost” by Albert E.Cowdrey (F&SF)
  20. “It Takes Two” by Nicola Griffith (Eclipse Three)
  21. “Blocked” by Geoff Ryman (F&SF)
  22. “Solace” by James Van Pelt (Analog)
  23. “Act One” by Nancy Kress (Asimov’s)
  24. “Twilight of the Gods” by John C. Wright (Federations)
  25. “Blood Dauber” by Ted Kosmatka & Michael Poore (Asimov’s)
  26. “This Wind Blowing, And This Tide” by Damien Broderick (Asimov’s)
  27. “Hair” by Adam Roberts (When It Changed)
  28. “Before My Last Breath” by Robert Reed (Asimov’s)
  29. “One of Our Bastards Is Missing” by Paul Cornell (Solaris Book of New Science Fiction, Vol. Three)
  30. “Edison’s Frankenstein” by Chris Roberson (Postscripts 20/21)
  31. “Erosion” by Ian Creasey (Asimov’s)
  32. “Vishnu at the Cat Circus” by Ian McDonald (Cyberabad Days)

[via Jason Sanford]

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