[Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]

Be it stand alone comics or an ongoing storyline, everyone enjoys a good webcomic. But I need some new ones to follow and explore. With that in mind, I asked our panelists this question:

Q: Which webcomic should I be reading right now? What do you most enjoy about it?

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Author Guy Hasson Launches New Worlds Comics

SF Author Guy Hasson writes in to tell us that he has launched New Worlds Comics, an digital-only comics line that promises to “bring the highest level of science fiction and fantasy to comic books.”

At launch, New Worlds Comics is available for the iPad only via iTunes. Within two months, it will also be available for the iPhone, then Android, then the web.

Following is New Worlds Comics manifesto
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Author Guy Hasson has just posted his underground SF Film, The Indestructibles, starring Tamara Pearlman, Nathalie klein Selle and Tomer Shechori.

The Indestructibles is an independent, low-budget science fiction superhero film that just premiered at the Utopia Science Fiction and Fantasy Film Festival is now online for free at the website KillAllGods.com.

Here’s the synopsis:

For over 200 years, superhero battles ravaged the earth. Once they were defeated, hundreds of thousands superhero bodies littered the streets. They are living, breathing vegetables that cannot die and do not grow old. One day, the superheroes come back. Only Rachel Gardner, a high school teacher, can stop them.

(See also: the film journal, chronicling the film’s journey.)


Guy Hasson is an SF author and a filmmaker. His latest books are Secret Thoughts by Apex Books and The Emoticon Generation by Infinity Plus. His 45-minute epic SF film, The Indestructibles, which he wrote and directed, will be released on the web in a few weeks, and his start-up New Worlds Comics will go live in July.

An SF Legend Is Born
Mary Belle teaches Guy Hasson How to Blow the Minds of SF Fans

by Guy Hasson

I am highly disappointed with you SF Signal readers.

I didn’t want to return to Mary Belle, CEO of Digital Kingmakers. But you forced me to. Twice now.

To those of you with short memories: It started with a harmless guest post on SF Signal, a funny post that received no comments. Out of nowhere, I received a phone from Ms. Belle, claiming her GPO (Guest Post Optimization) expertise could make my guest posts go viral. I went out of curiosity and was outraged by her opinion of SF readers. And yet that post received 17 comments, viral by SF Signal standards and was chosen as one of the top 30 posts for that month.

True to my public word, I returned to Digital Kingmakers, where I received psycho, psychedelic insight into the psyche of the SF readers. (Don’t remember? What if I told you Benedict Cumberbatch, Neil Gaiman, and Guy Hasson walked into a bar?) I was enraged again. I claimed it would never work. Again. But Ms. Belle’s assertion that that one post would increase my sales in 1,000% a month were on the nose. A month has passed, and The Emoticon Generation‘s Amazon sales went up by exactly 1,000%. I begged you not to buy my book. Against my own financial interest. I begged you. But you didn’t listen. On top of which, that post received 17 comments too, and was chosen as one of the top 25 posts for that month. Again.

It’s like you want me to go back to her. Do you not realize what a nightmare those meetings are?

Well, I kept my word and returned to Digital Kingmakers for a third time. While the first time was infuriating and the second time was psychedelic, the third time topped them all by being so outrageous that had I written about it in a story, you would never have believed it.

Before we start, close your eyes. Try and imagine the craziest thing that could happen. I promise you that whatever you come up is not half as crazy as what really happened. I. Promise.

So. For the last time. Here’s what happened.
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Guy Hasson is an SF author and a filmmaker. His latest books are Secret Thoughts by Apex Books and The Emoticon Generation by Infinity Plus. His 45-minute epic SF film, The Indestructibles, which he wrote and directed, will be released on the web in a few weeks, and his start-up New Worlds Comics will go live in July.

Benedict Cumberbatch, Neil Gaiman, and Guy Hasson walk into a bar…

A second glance at Digital Kingmakers’ research into the psyche of SF readers
A guest post by Guy Hasson

To be clear: this post is your fault, the fault of SF Signal readers.

In my last guest post a few weeks ago, I told you about how I was approached by Mary Belle, CEO of Digital Kingmakers, and how she offered to make my guests posts go viral.

It was…an experience, which I had fully relayed in my post. Her theories were infuriating. And yet, having done everything she said, the new post got 17 comments (viral by SF Signal standards), while my original post (no less brilliant) got none. (Don’t remember? Check it out.) That post even made the list for top 30 SF Signal posts in May.

True to my public promise, I returned to the offices of Digital Kingmakers. In the email that preceded the meeting, Ms. Belle promised to further reveal to me the psyche of the SF fans in a way that would increase my book sales by 1000% in a month.

Last time the experience was insulting. This time it proved to be…psychedelic.

I wish I could tell you I was making this up. But I can’t.

Here’s what happened.
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Guy Hasson is an SF author and a filmmaker. His latest books are Secret Thoughts by Apex Books and The Emoticon Generation by Infinity Plus. His 45-minute epic SF film, The Indestructibles, which he wrote and directed, will be released on the web in a few weeks, and his start-up New Worlds Comics will go live in July.

Keep It Stupid, Simpleton
A New Trend In High-tech, Gpo Analysis, Labels Sf Readers As Stupid
A Guest Post written by Guy Hasson

A few days ago, I got a phone call from an unknown caller.

“Am I speaking to Guy Hasson?” The woman was cordial.

“Yes,” I said, wary.

“I read your guest post in SF Signal,” she said as if we’re old friends. “The one about the zombies.”

“I’m sorry, what?” Strangers don’t usually call me about these things. There’s a reason God created email.

“And I saw no one left any comments,” she continued.

“Yeah?” I said, warier and warier.

“We can help you with that.”
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[GUEST POST] Guy Hasson on The Zombie Apocalypse Vocabulary


Guy Hasson is an SF author and a filmmaker. His latest books are Secret Thoughts by Apex Books and The Emoticon Generation by Infinity Plus. His 45-minute epic SF film, The Indestructibles, which he wrote and directed, will be released on the web in a few weeks, and his start-up New Worlds Comics will go live in July.

The Zombie Apocalypse Vocabulary

Death is not the end. Ask any zombie. Or check with your neighborhood vampire.

And yet the English language has been criminally lax in coping with the supremely real situations that science fiction and fantasy have been aware of for years. There are so many situations that deal with various versions of death as well as situations that arise afterwards, and yet there are no words specifically designed to describe these situations. One can only ask: Where’s Saffire? And why is he letting death stop him from rectifying this problem?

English has only given us the word ‘predecease’ which surely you’ve used countless times before. While others may mangle the language by saying ‘the son died before the father’ we all know the correct phrase is ‘the son predeceased the father’.

This article is meant to at least begin to put right the lack of death in the English language by offering eight new essential words, just like ‘predecease‘, about the subject we all love to love:

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MIND MELD: The Future of Humans and AI

[Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]

Recently, a group of futurists predicted that artificial intelligence is a deadlier threat to humanity than any sort of natural disaster, nuclear war, or large objects falling from the sky. In an article by Ross Anderson at AeonMagazine.com, David Dewey, a research fellow at the Future of Humanity Institute says, concerning the human brain and probability “If you had a machine that was designed specifically to make inferences about the world, instead of a machine like the human brain, you could make discoveries like that much faster.” He stated that “An AI might want to do certain things with matter in order to achieve a goal, things like building giant computers, or other large-scale engineering projects. Those things might involve intermediary steps, like tearing apart the Earth to make huge solar panels.” He also talked about how programming an AI with empathy wouldn’t be easy, that the steps it might take to “maximize human happiness”, for example, are not things that we might consider acceptable, but to an AI would seem exceedingly efficient.

Of course, this leads into much more complex discussion, and the possibilities with AI are vast and varied.

We asked this week’s panelists…

Q: What is your take on the future of humans and AI? Is it positive, negative, both?

Here’s what they said…

Larry Niven
Until Larry Niven is the author of Ringworld, the co-author of The Mote in God’s Eye and Lucifer’s Hammer, the editor of the Man-Kzin War series, and has written or co-authored over 50 books. He is a five-time winner of the Hugo Award, along with a Nebula and numerous others.

  • If you make an intelligent being, you must give it civil rights.
  • On the other hand, you cannot give the vote to a computer program. “One man, one vote” — and how many copies of the program would you need to win an election? Programs can merge or can generate subprograms.
  • Machines can certainly become a part of a human. Our future may see a merging of humans and machines.
  • Or all of the above. Keep reading science fiction. We always get there first.

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