Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
Read the rest of this entry


Daryl Gregory‘s latest books are We Are All Completely Fine (Tachyon Publications) and the near-future SF novel Afterparty (Tor Books). The YA Lovecraftian adventure Harrison Squared is forthcoming from Tor. He lives in State College, PA, in a rapidly emptying house, and is looking for a good dog. If you know of one, you can contact him at darylgregory.com.

How to Write a Completely Inadequate Horror Movie

by Daryl Gregory

I grew up during the golden age of slasher flicks. Jason, Freddy, Michael, and Chucky were my teenage companions. I remember being in the theatre for the original Friday the 13th, watching the face of that “final girl” as the credits rolled. She knew the nightmare would never be over. The monster would be coming back, though for a new set of victims and cheaper actors.

It was only years later that I began musing about what happened to those sole survivors after the movie was over. How were they not dysfunctional wrecks for the rest of their lives? Serious therapy-and serious meds-had to be in their future. Even when a hero or heroine returned for a sequel, the years of recovery (or attempted recovery) were barely touched on, or skipped altogether, before the new batch of bodies began piling up. But what was life like for them between the movies?

It’s not the job of movies to answer these questions. In every film (like any work of art) there must be things left unsaid, aspects of those worlds that go unexplained because they would destroy the tone of the movie, dilute its effects, or just plain blow out its running time. But some questions are left unexamined because movies can’t ask them: they’re ill-equipped for certain tasks that prose fiction is built to handle.
Read the rest of this entry


Screenwriter, playwright, actor, and author of Martuk…the Holy and The Martuk Series, Jonathan Winn was born in Seattle, WA. He currently lives in the US. Martuk…the Holy: Proseuche is his second full-length novel and can be found on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Smashwords.

A Monster Hiding in Plain Sight

by Jonathan Winn

I don’t live in a world where sparkly vampires sigh like lovelorn teenagers, their emotional angst all but defanging them.

I don’t live in a world where zombies with endless appetites lurch and stumble, their ends often coming with a surprising thwack of a shovel.

No, where I live is truly monstrous. It’s dark and forbidding. A place where innocent lives have grisly ends and ghosts still sob. The world I live in is one of betrayal and mistrust. Where the line separating enemy from friend is cloudy and constantly shifting. A land where those who walk and talk like you and me share nothing of our humanity. The world of my immortal Martuk (as in “two” with a hard “k” at the end…Martuk) is one where monsters hide in plain sight, and the blood on their hands is steeped in consequence and regret.
Read the rest of this entry


Kevin Lucia recently served as a Submissions Reader for Cemetery Dance Magazine, and his podcast Horror 101 is featured monthly on Tales to Terrify. His short fiction has appeared in several anthologies. He’s currently finishing his Creative Writing Masters Degree at Binghamton University, he teaches high school English and lives in Castle Creek, New York with his wife and children. He is the author of Hiram Grange & The Chosen One, Book Four of The Hiram Grange Chronicles. His first short story collection, Things Slip Through was published November 2013. His nw novel is Devourer of Souls, an original tale of cosmic horror.

Hiding In The Cracks Between Things

by Kevin Lucia

My initial attempts at writing horror resulted in very obvious attempts to “scare” the reader. I had monsters – vampires, werewolves, demons – and I had blood and pumping viscera. There were incantations, tentacles, and “unspeakable horrors from beyond the grave.” Frequently, I had awful people doing awful things, and awful things happening to those awful people as a consequence.

Though some of those early efforts glimmered with potential, most of them were cliché, on the nose, and very obvious “horror stories.” Most of them were rejected, for which I’m very thankful, today. Luckily, I was new and clueless and convinced I was the second coming of [Insert Horror Writer's Name Here], so I kept plugging away.

Eventually my technique improved. I learned how to end stories. I learned how to cut, learned word economy. I started selling stories here and there to small press, semi-pro venues. Some folks found them entertaining, and hey: progress was progress.

But about the time I turned down invitations to both a vampire and zombie anthology, (thinking, “Geez, I don’t WANT to write those kinds of stories.”) I began turning my thoughts toward the kind of stories I DID want to write. I’d accepted the horror genre as my own, if only because my stories didn’t seem to fit anywhere else. Now I felt the need to stop writing stories for submissions calls, and start writing stories for me.
Read the rest of this entry

Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
Read the rest of this entry

Table of Contents: Nightmare Magazine, June 2014

Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
Read the rest of this entry

Table of Contents: Nightmare Magazine, May 2014

Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
Read the rest of this entry


Suzanne Church juggles her time between throwing her characters to the lions and chillin’ like a villain with her two sons. She writes science fiction, fantasy, and horror because she enjoys them all and hates to play favorites. Her award-winning fiction has appeared in Clarkesworld, Cicada and On Spec, and in several anthologies including Urban Green Man and When the Hero Comes Home 2. Her collection of short fiction ELEMENTS, is published by EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy.

10 Ways to Keep Your SF&F-Loving Boyfriend Happy While Enjoying Your Horror Fix

by Suzanne Church

My biography states, “I write science fiction, fantasy, and horror because I love them all and hate to play favorites”. Notice how horror comes last.

I love the macabre. Which is why I both read and write horror fiction, and buy horror DVDs. Conversely, my boyfriend is uncomfortable with scary-and-icky images.

As my partner, he’s always shown an unrelenting determination to support my writing career. He enjoys my SF worlds. He becomes engrossed in my fantastical tales. But he’d rather not read my horror fiction.

Are you suffering from a similar relationship roadblock?

Does your partner hide in the kitchen, claiming they’re “making a sandwich” while you’re cheering on another zombie kill on The Walking Dead?

Then you need my: 10 Ways to Keep Your SF&F-Loving Boyfriend Happy While Enjoying Your Horror Fix!
Read the rest of this entry

Table of Contents: Nightmare Magazine, April 2014

Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
Read the rest of this entry

Aghast: A Journal of the Darkly Fantastic

Kraken Press editor-in-chief George Cotronis has announced the launch of a Kickstarter campaign to fund a new horror magazine.

Aghast – A Journal of the Darkly Fantastic is an illustrated bi-annual journal of horror and dark fantasy short fiction. It will be available online, as well as in print and digital formats Aghast will feature original short fiction and each short story will be accompanied by an illustration by artist George Cotronis.

The first issue will feature stories by Jonathan Maberry, Gemma Files, Jeff Strand, Tim Waggoner and Megan Arkenberg. AGHAST is still accepting stories for issue #1.

The campaign was 15% funded on it’s first day with most of it’s limited reward levels still available. All the rewards are super-cool, so check it out!

Video appears after the jump.

Read the rest of this entry

Table of Contents: Nightmare Magazine, March 2014

Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
Read the rest of this entry

Table of Contents: Nightmare Magazine, February 2014

Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
Read the rest of this entry

Recommended Reading by Professionals…with Michael Rowe

In this series, I ask various publishing professionals (including authors, bloggers, editors, agents etc.) to recommend 2-3 authors or books they feel haven’t received the recognition they deserve.

Today’s recommendations are by Michael Rowe. Michael Rowe is an award-winning journalist and literary nonfiction writer. He created and edited the critically acclaimed horror anthologies Queer Fear and Queer Fear 2, has written numerous short stories, and published two horror novels: Enter, Night and the recently released Wild Fell.

Read the rest of this entry


Prime Books has posted the table of contents for the upcoming anthology The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy & Horror: 2014:

Here’s the book description:

No matter your expectations, the dark is full of the unknown: grim futures, distorted pasts, invasions of the uncanny, paranormal fancies, weird dreams, unnerving nightmares, baffling enigmas, revelatory excursions, desperate adventures, spectral journeys, mundane terrors and supernatural visions. You may stumble into obsession or find redemption. Often disturbing, occasionally delightful, let The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy and Horror be your annual guide through the mysteries and wonders of dark fiction.

Here’s the table of contents…
Read the rest of this entry

Recent Horror Collections from Centipede Press

Over at the Kirkus Reviews Blog, I look at Recent Horror Collections from Centipede Press.

(Note: Perhaps a better title would have been New Horror Collections from Centipede Press as it seems the reelase dates of some of the titles may have changed and won’t be available until next month.)

Table of Contents: Nightmare Magazine, January 2014

a href=”http://amzn.to/15RMuBk”>Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
Read the rest of this entry

Short Film: Saturday The 14th!

Here’s a short parody of horror films for a lazy Saturday…
Read the rest of this entry

BOOK REVIEW: Reanimators by Pete Rawlik

REVIEW SUMMARY: This homage to H.P. Lovecraft’s “Herbert West – Reanimator” breathes life into minor Lovecraft characters. A slower pace and certain characterization stylings will get the reader into the mood of the source material.

MY RATING:

BRIEF SYNOPSIS: While getting his revenge on Dr. Herbert West, Dr. Stuart Hartwell romps through the author’s favorite Lovecraft stories.

MY REVIEW:
PROS: A great way to pay a visit to the fictional world of H.P. Lovecraft; compelling cover art.
CONS: Pacing is incredibly slow especially at the beginning; episodic action often felt forced; I never connected with the protagonist
BOTTOM LINE: Readers well versed in Lovecraft lore will find a lot to love, but readers new to the fiction of H.P. Lovecraft may have a tough time getting their bearings.

Odd things are afoot in the sleepy new England town of Arkham. Strange creatures stalk the night, and even stranger research is happening at and around Miskatonic University. Dr. Stuart Hartwell is determined to get his revenge on Dr. Herbert West, the twisted man whose reanimation experiments were responsible for the deaths of Hartwell’s parents. Fans of H.P. Lovecraft (and certain fans of some early 80s cheesy horror flicks) may recognize the title of the book and the name Herbert West.
Read the rest of this entry

Table of Contents: Nightmare Magazine, December 2013

Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
Read the rest of this entry

[GUEST POST] Kenneth W. Cain Asks: What’s This “Horror” You Speak Of?


Kenneth W. Cain is the author of The Saga of I (These Trespasses, Grave Revelations, Reckoning), The Dead Civil War, the acclaimed short story collection These Old Tales, and his latest short story collection Fresh Cut Tales. He lives with his wife and children in Eastern Pennsylvania. kennethwcain.com.

What’s This “Horror” You Speak Of?

by Kenneth W. Cain

When people discover I am a writer, the first question is almost always to ask what genre. I’m quick to snap off that I write horror, but despite a childhood filled with speech therapy I still sometimes have trouble with my R’s. Their reaction is just that, horror, when the last syllable has been dropped off the word. An awkward silence follows until I clarify my preferred genre as dark fiction.
Read the rest of this entry

 Page 1 of 4  1  2  3  4 »