Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
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Kraken Press editor-in-chief George Cotronis has announced the launch of a Kickstarter campaign to fund a new horror magazine.

Aghast – A Journal of the Darkly Fantastic is an illustrated bi-annual journal of horror and dark fantasy short fiction. It will be available online, as well as in print and digital formats Aghast will feature original short fiction and each short story will be accompanied by an illustration by artist George Cotronis.

The first issue will feature stories by Jonathan Maberry, Gemma Files, Jeff Strand, Tim Waggoner and Megan Arkenberg. AGHAST is still accepting stories for issue #1.

The campaign was 15% funded on it’s first day with most of it’s limited reward levels still available. All the rewards are super-cool, so check it out!

Video appears after the jump.

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Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
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Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
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In this series, I ask various publishing professionals (including authors, bloggers, editors, agents etc.) to recommend 2-3 authors or books they feel haven’t received the recognition they deserve.

Today’s recommendations are by Michael Rowe. Michael Rowe is an award-winning journalist and literary nonfiction writer. He created and edited the critically acclaimed horror anthologies Queer Fear and Queer Fear 2, has written numerous short stories, and published two horror novels: Enter, Night and the recently released Wild Fell.

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Prime Books has posted the table of contents for the upcoming anthology The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy & Horror: 2014:

Here’s the book description:

No matter your expectations, the dark is full of the unknown: grim futures, distorted pasts, invasions of the uncanny, paranormal fancies, weird dreams, unnerving nightmares, baffling enigmas, revelatory excursions, desperate adventures, spectral journeys, mundane terrors and supernatural visions. You may stumble into obsession or find redemption. Often disturbing, occasionally delightful, let The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy and Horror be your annual guide through the mysteries and wonders of dark fiction.

Here’s the table of contents…
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Recent Horror Collections from Centipede Press

Over at the Kirkus Reviews Blog, I look at Recent Horror Collections from Centipede Press.

(Note: Perhaps a better title would have been New Horror Collections from Centipede Press as it seems the reelase dates of some of the titles may have changed and won’t be available until next month.)

Table of Contents: Nightmare Magazine, January 2014

a href=”http://amzn.to/15RMuBk”>Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
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Short Film: Saturday The 14th!

Here’s a short parody of horror films for a lazy Saturday…
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BOOK REVIEW: Reanimators by Pete Rawlik

REVIEW SUMMARY: This homage to H.P. Lovecraft’s “Herbert West – Reanimator” breathes life into minor Lovecraft characters. A slower pace and certain characterization stylings will get the reader into the mood of the source material.

MY RATING:

BRIEF SYNOPSIS: While getting his revenge on Dr. Herbert West, Dr. Stuart Hartwell romps through the author’s favorite Lovecraft stories.

MY REVIEW:
PROS: A great way to pay a visit to the fictional world of H.P. Lovecraft; compelling cover art.
CONS: Pacing is incredibly slow especially at the beginning; episodic action often felt forced; I never connected with the protagonist
BOTTOM LINE: Readers well versed in Lovecraft lore will find a lot to love, but readers new to the fiction of H.P. Lovecraft may have a tough time getting their bearings.

Odd things are afoot in the sleepy new England town of Arkham. Strange creatures stalk the night, and even stranger research is happening at and around Miskatonic University. Dr. Stuart Hartwell is determined to get his revenge on Dr. Herbert West, the twisted man whose reanimation experiments were responsible for the deaths of Hartwell’s parents. Fans of H.P. Lovecraft (and certain fans of some early 80s cheesy horror flicks) may recognize the title of the book and the name Herbert West.
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Table of Contents: Nightmare Magazine, December 2013

Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
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[GUEST POST] Kenneth W. Cain Asks: What’s This “Horror” You Speak Of?


Kenneth W. Cain is the author of The Saga of I (These Trespasses, Grave Revelations, Reckoning), The Dead Civil War, the acclaimed short story collection These Old Tales, and his latest short story collection Fresh Cut Tales. He lives with his wife and children in Eastern Pennsylvania. kennethwcain.com.

What’s This “Horror” You Speak Of?

by Kenneth W. Cain

When people discover I am a writer, the first question is almost always to ask what genre. I’m quick to snap off that I write horror, but despite a childhood filled with speech therapy I still sometimes have trouble with my R’s. Their reaction is just that, horror, when the last syllable has been dropped off the word. An awkward silence follows until I clarify my preferred genre as dark fiction.
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TOC: Nightmare Magazine, November 2013

Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
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Aamzon has the table of contents for the new anthology Whispers from the Abyss: An Anthology of of H.P. Lovecraft-Inspired Fiction:

Here’s the book description:

On the subway, during lunch, or even under the fluorescent glow of your cubical—there is no escape! Now your slow descent into madness can follow you through the day, as well as the night. The WHISPERS FROM THE ABYSS ANTHOLOGY is the first ever H.P. Lovecraft inspired collection created specifically for readers on the go. All 33 spine-chilling tales are concentrated bites of terror which include works by Greg Stolze (Delta Green), Nick Mamatas (Shotguns v. Cthulhu), Tim Pratt (Marla Mason), Dennis Detwiller (Delta Green), Greg Van Eekhout (The Boy at the End of the World), A.C. Wise (Future Lovecraft), David Tallerman (Giant Thief), Silvia Moreno-Garcia (Future Lovecraft), John R. Fultz (Seven Princes), Chad Fifer (The H.P. Lovecraft Literary Podcast).

“All about that moment I love, the moment where something approaches. The moment where you close your eyes and hope it goes away. It will. But there’ll be another story right behind it. And another. And another.” -Alasdair Stuart, host of the PSEUDOPOD podcast.

Here’s the table of contents…
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Short Horror Film: Haselwurm

Lovecraft eZine has discovered this cool short Italian film called Haselwurm. It’s about a mythical creature that lives on Alpi mountain in Italy and it’s inspired by the weird writings of H.P. Lovecraft. (Is there any other kind?)

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Jonathan L. Howard is a game designer, scriptwriter, and a veteran of the computer games industry since the early ‘nineties with titles such as the Broken Sword series to his credit. He is the author of the young adult novels Katya’s World and Katya’s War as well as the Johannes Cabal Comic Fantasy series, the latest book of which is Johannes Cabal: The Fear Institute.

The Appeal of Lovecraftian Horror

By Jonathan L. Howard

Monsters, done well, are scary. Hordes of monsters, done properly, can be scarier. Organised hordes of monsters, done sensibly, can be scariest.
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Great Genre Fiction Reads For Halloween

Over at Kirkus Reviews today, I suggest some recent, spooky reads for Halloween.

Check out Great Genre Fiction Reads For Halloween.

THE CRAFT: Mercedes M. Yardley on Writing Horror

The Craft is a column that explores the writing process, each month focusing on a different aspect of the craft. This month I asked Mercedes M. Yardley, the author of Apocalyptic Montessa and Nuclear Lulu: A Tale of Atomic Love and Beautiful Sorrows, about writing horror. Here’s what she had to say…


James Aquilone: What is the surest way of scaring the bejesus out of a reader?

Mercedes M. Yardley: I think the surest way to scare the reader is to write something that scares yourself. If you’re writing with that sense of terror, the reader will pick up on it. I’m scared of losing my children. I’m scared of being cut with knives. These are themes that show up in my work, and even if you aren’t afraid of being sliced and diced like I am, hopefully you’ll feel that sense of foreboding because I do.

We’re all afraid. We’re all human animals, and fear is hardwired into our genes. As an author, exploit that.
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TOC: Nightmare Magazine, October 2013

Nightmare Magazine sent along the table of contents for their new issue:
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Johnny Worthen is a lifetime student of the occult and supernatural. Raised in a secluded suburb of Salt Lake City, he gravitated to the more obscure paths of spiritual knowledge. He is a Freemason, twice Past Master of his Lodge, youngest ever at the time. Johnny received a Bachelor’s Degree in English with a Latin minor before earning a Master’s Degree in American Studies from the University of Utah. He lived a year in Denmark and a decade in Oregon until the rain drove him back to the dry high deserts of Utah. He married his junior-prom date and together they have two sons. After many varied and interesting careers, Johnny writes full time now. His debut novel, BEATRYSEL, is available now on Amazon, published by Omnium Gatherum. You can find and follow him on his website, on Twitter as @JohnnyWorthen, on Facebook and on GoodReads.

Why Supernatural Horror is Supreme

by Johnny Worthen

“There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.” — Hamlet Act 1, Scene 5

You do not need to leave this world to find horror. One glance at evening news and any writer will have plenty of inspiration to chill an audience. Terrorism, war, environmental collapse, train derailments, pandemics, the quiet man down the lane — these things are real and chilling and have within them the nucleus for horror and the seeds for a dramatic exploration of terror.

But they’re not my favorite.

I prefer my things that go bump in the night to have more foreign addresses. Perhaps it’s a comment on my actual cowardice that I prefer to have supernatural agents in my thrillers than knife-wielding psychopaths. When it’s all over and I’m crawling back under the sheets, I can more easily console myself that it’s not real.

Then again, maybe I can’t.

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