BOOK REVIEW: Ancillary Sword by Ann Leckie

Last year I reviewed Ann Leckie’s Ancillary Justice before it swept the major SF awards–including the Hugo, the Nebula, the Golden Tentacle, the Arthur C. Clarke, BSFA, and the Locus Award, as well as nominations for Phillip K. Dick award, Tiptree Award, and Compton Crook Award. Today marks the release of the second book in the three-part series, this one titled Ancillary Sword. If you haven’t read Ancillary Justice yet, and you don’t want spoilers for that book go read that review and that book instead. I highly recommend. (Also, Carl Slaughter recently interviewed Ann Leckie on Diabolical Plots, go check that out too.)

Still here? For a high level summary of Ancillary Justice, go read the review. At the end of Ancillary Justice, Breq succeeds in bringing out the internal conflict of the many-bodied emperor of the Radchaai empire and starting out-and-out interstellar war, taken into the confidence by one side of Anaander Miaanai while the other one sabotages the interstellar gates to try to keep the news from spreading.

The second book starts with Breq taking the only assignment from Anaander that she would accept–to visit Athoek Station, an important station where Lieutenant Awn’s sister Bosnaaid lives. Although she is only given one ship, Mercy of Kalr, Breq is promoted to the position of Fleet Captain to ensure she has authority over other captains she crosses. Her friend Seivarden is one of her lieutenants on the ship. Breq wishes to go to have the opportunity to make amends to Bosnaaid for the role she played in Awn’s death. Anaander wants Breq to go to make sure that Athoek Station is ready to defend against attack from the other Anaander. But nothing with 3000-year-old Anaander Miaanai is ever simple–Anaander has already shown herself very capable of great trickery, able as she is to bypass security systems and AIs with powerful access codes. Breq knows that Anaander wouldn’t let a powerful person like Breq go without some kind of insurance, but what form will that insurance take?

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In episode 132 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester sits down to chat with Kij Johnson, Hugo Nominated Author of The Man Who Bridged The Mist.

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Continuing a trend tailor-made for the Twitter generation, here are my quick takes on a few recently-watched genre-related films.

Quick thoughts follow…
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Hugo Voting is Now Open

Hugo voting period is now open!

Of passing note, SF Signal is eligible in both the fanzine category (for the blog itself) and the fancast category (for the SF Signal podcast).

The more important thing to note is that SF Signal would not happen at all if it weren’t for the outstanding work of our wonderful contributors, many of whom are eligible for the fan writer category:
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The 2010 Hugo Awards, honoring works first published in 2009 or works first published in 2009 in the US that were published in a previous year outside the US, have been announced. Awards will be presented in Melbourne, Australia during Aussiecon 4, the 68th World Science Fiction Convention

Here are the nominees (story titles link to free, online versions, some via Joe Sherry):


BEST NOVEL
  • Boneshaker by Cherie Priest (Tor) [See SF Signal review]
  • The City & The City by China Miéville (Del Rey; Macmillan UK)
  • Julian Comstock: A Story of 22nd-Century America by Robert Charles Wilson (Tor)
  • Palimpsest by Catherynne M. Valente (Bantam Spectra)
  • Wake by Robert J. Sawyer (Ace; Penguin; Gollancz; Analog) [See SF Signal review]
  • The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi (Night Shade) [See SF Signal review]

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