Ian Hocking is the author of three science fiction novels in the Saskia Brandt series: Déjà Vu (winner of the 2011 Red Adept Reviews Award for Science Fiction), Flashback, and The Amber Rooms. His new novel is the time travel thriller Red Star Falling. He is represented by Kneerim, Williams and Bloom. By day, he is an experimental psychologist. Like all British people, he lives in London, and probably does know that friend/relative of yours who also lives in London.

The Genesis of a Book Title

So I’m twenty feet up the climbing wall and my grip is weakening. I have just enough breath to shout, “I’m going to fall!” Then I’m tilting back. My feet slip from the holds and I’m falling. My arms dangle outwards and my legs are akimbo. I’m like an upside-down skydiver.
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Ian Hocking is the author of three science fiction novels in the Saskia Brandt series: Déjà Vu (winner of the 2011 Red Adept Reviews Award for Science Fiction), Flashback, and now The Amber Rooms. He is represented by Kneerim, Williams and Bloom. By day, he is an experimental psychologist. Like all British people, he lives in London, and probably does know that friend/relative of yours who also lives in London.

What the hell do I know? Ian Hocking on recreating the past

I have three problems. One, I’m not a woman. Two, I have never traveled in time backwards – only forwards, boringly. Three, my experience of Russia is largely confined to a mafia-run souvenir shop in St Petersburg.

The heroine of my first two novels – Déjà Vu and Flashback – is a woman called Saskia Brandt. She travels in time – backwards. And she has been living in Russia since April of 1905, when book three, The Amber Rooms, begins. She will probably crop up in further installments, given that the series is called The Saskia Brandt Series. (I wouldn’t call that a dead cert, however. British readers will be aware of the Scottish TV crime drama Taggart, which continued long after the Jim Taggart of the title had popped his wee clogs.)

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Free Kindle eBook [US and UK]: ‘Déjà Vu’ by Ian Hocking

For the next 3 days, Déjà Vu, book one in The Saskia Brandt Series by Ian Hocking (who we interviewed here), is available for the low, low price of free from Amazon U.S. and Amazon U.K.

Here’s the book description:

** Winner of the 2011 Red Adept Reviews Indie Award for Science Fiction **

It is 2023. Scientist David Proctor is running for his life. On his trail is Saskia Brandt, a detective with the European FIB. She has questions. Questions about a bomb that exploded back in 2003. But someone is hunting her too. The clues are in the shattered memories of her previous life.

Déjà Vu takes the reader on a startling journey through a possible future, though digital minds, and through the consequences of the choices we make. It is the debut novel by Ian Hocking.

Grab it while it’s free!

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: Ian Hocking

Ian Hocking is a novelist and experimental psychologist living in Canterbury, UK. Like Chaucer, he twangs guitars. Déjà Vu is his first novel. Flashback, the sequel, is due out in May.

[Photo Copyright Mimika Cooney]


Charles Tan: Hi! Thanks for agreeing to do the interview. First off, why science fiction and thrillers?

Ian Hocking: It’s my pleasure. Thanks for having me. Why science fiction? I had no real objective to set out as a science fiction author. I simply wrote stuff that I’d enjoy reading. I’m huge movie fan, and I’ve always that he most visceral reaction to intelligent thrillers. When done right – like The Usual Suspects – they are hard to beat. The science fiction creeps because I see these elements as interesting things to explore over the course of a novel. I might consider an intelligent computer, for instance, and think: What would it really be like to talk to a computer? In some ways, I’m doing that already when I chew out my MacBrook Pro over its failure to link with my Magic Mouse when it wakes up. But how would a computer talk when it has no body, no childhood, and no brain? These more interesting, philosophical questions combine with the thriller and I get a technothriller like Déjà Vu and its sequels.

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