Tag Archives: John Joseph Adams

Kindle/Nook Deal: Grab “The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination” Edited by John Joseph Adams for $1.99

Hey, eBook readers!

At the time of this writing, Amazon US and Barnes and Noble are listing the brand new John Joseph Adams anthology The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination for only $1.99! And DRM-free!

Take a look at the stellar list of contributors and determine for yourself whether or not this is a great deal. (Hint: It is.)
Continue reading

Q&A with the Authors of the New Anthology “The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination” (Part 2)

Edited by John Joseph Adams and published by TOR, The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination features all original, all nefarious, all conquering tales from the megalomaniacal pens of Diana Gabaldon, Austin Grossman, Seanan McGuire, Naomi Novik, Daniel H. Wilson and 17 OTHER EVIL GENIUSES.

The book description is this:

Mad scientists have never had it so tough. In super-hero comics, graphic novels, films, TV series, video games and even works of what may be fiction, they are besieged by those who stand against them, devoid of sympathy for their irrational, megalomaniacal impulses to rule, destroy or otherwise dominate the world as we know it.

We asked a few of the authors a couple of questions…

Continue reading

Q&A with the Authors of the New Anthology “The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination”

Edited by John Joseph Adams and published by TOR, The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination features all original, all nefarious, all conquering tales from the megalomaniacal pens of Diana Gabaldon, Austin Grossman, Seanan McGuire, Naomi Novik, Daniel H. Wilson and 17 OTHER EVIL GENIUSES.

The book description is this:

Mad scientists have never had it so tough. In super-hero comics, graphic novels, films, TV series, video games and even works of what may be fiction, they are besieged by those who stand against them, devoid of sympathy for their irrational, megalomaniacal impulses to rule, destroy or otherwise dominate the world as we know it.

We asked a few of the authors a couple of questions…

Continue reading

TOC: ‘The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination’ Edited by John Joseph Adams

John Joseph Adams has posted the table of contents for his new themed anthology The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination.:

Here’s the book description:

From Victor Frankenstein to Lex Luthor, from Dr. Moreau to Dr. Doom, readers have long been fascinated by insane plans for world domination and the madmen who devise them. Typically, we see these villains through the eyes of good guys. This anthology, however, explores the world of mad scientists and evil geniuses—from their own wonderfully twisted point of view.

An all-star roster of bestselling authors—including Diana Gabaldon, Daniel Wilson, Austin Grossman, Naomi Novik, and Seanan McGuire…twenty-two great storytellers all told—have produced a fabulous assortment of stories guaranteed to provide readers with hour after hour of high-octane entertainment born of the most megalomaniacal mayhem imaginable.

Everybody loves villains. They’re bad; they always stir the pot; they’re much more fun than the good guys, even if we want to see the good guys win. Their fiendish schemes, maniacal laughter, and limitless ambition are legendary, but what lies behind those crazy eyes and wicked grins? How—and why—do they commit these nefarious deeds? And why are they so set on taking over the world?

If you’ve ever asked yourself any of these questions, you’re in luck: It’s finally time for the madmen’s side of the story.

Here’s the table of contents…
Continue reading

David D. Levine Performs Dr. Talon’s “Letter to the Editor”

Now this is a great idea for an anthology promotion: Have one of the book’s authors (in this case, David Levine) read his short story (in this case, “Letter to the Editor”) in character as the mad scientist Dr. Talon.

Not only do you get free fiction…you get a wonderful performance as well.

The anthology is The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination edited by John Joseph Adams, a themed anthology with 22 stories.

Check it out after the break.

Continue reading

John Joseph Adams Launches New Website for ‘Oz Reimagined’ Anthology (+ TOC)

Editor John Joseph Adams has launched the website companion for his upcoming (February 2013) anthology Oz Reimagined.

Here’s what the anthology is about:

When L. Frank Baum introduced Dorothy and friends to the American public in 1900, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz became an instant, bestselling hit. Today the whimsical tale remains a cultural phenomenon that continues to spawn wildly popular books, movies, and musicals. Now, editors John Joseph Adams and Douglas Cohen have brought together leading fantasy writers such as Orson Scott Card and Seanan McGuire to create the ultimate anthology for Oz fans—and, really, any reader with an appetite for richly imagined worlds.

Like John’s previous anthology websites, the site for Oz Reimagined is loaded with tons of great stuff, like:
Continue reading

MIND MELD: The New Future For Star Wars

[Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]
The big news from last week was the acquisition of LucasFilm by Disney, giving the Mouse control of Star Wars and many other properties. While fans everywhere cheer the idea of no more Lucas mucking about with the films, another bit of news dropped that doesn’t seem to be getting as much play. Several decades after Lucas first floated the idea, Disney will be making three more episodes in the Star Wars saga, with episode 7 slated to land in 2015. Since this is apparently going to happen, our question is:

Q: What do you want to see from the new Star Wars movies in terms of stories? Do you have anyone you’d like to direct the movies or star in them?

Here’s what they said…
Continue reading

MIND MELD: Science Fiction Biographies We Would Like to See Published

[Today’s Mind Meld was suggested by an SF Signal reader, Gary Farber, who is here among our guests. Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]

In the past couple of years, we have seen the appearance of at the least two important biographies of Science Fiction writers, the first volume of Robert Patterson’s work on Robert A. Heinlein (Robert A. Heinlein: In Dialogue with His Century: Volume 1 (1907-1948): Learning Curve) and Listen to the Echoes: The Ray Bradbury Interviews, a sort of complement to Weller’s biography, published in 2006. But there are so many writers out there, living and dead, whose lives we would have loved to know a bit more so we maybe could feel the same feeling of closeness we use to feel when we are reading their stories.

So, we asked this week’s panelists…

Q: Which figure in the history of the creation of science fiction, living or dead, would you most like to see the next thorough biography of?

Here’s what they said…

John Joseph Adams
John Joseph Adams is the bestselling editor of many anthologies, such as Other Worlds Than These, Armored, Under the Moons of Mars: New Adventures on Barsoom, Brave New Worlds, Wastelands, The Living Dead, The Living Dead 2, By Blood We Live, Federations, The Improbable Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, and The Way of the Wizard. John is a four-time finalist for the Hugo Award and the World Fantasy Award, and he has been called “the reigning king of the anthology world” by Barnes & Noble. John is also the editor of Lightspeed Magazine and the new horror magazine, Nightmare, which launches October 1. In addition to his editorial projects, John is the co-host of Wired.com’s The Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast. His next anthology, Epic: Legends of Fantasy, comes out in November. Forthcoming in December is a revised and expanded second edition of his critically-acclaimed anthology, Brave New Worlds, and then, in February, Tor will publish his anthology The Mad Scientist’s Guide to World Domination. For more information, visit his website at johnjosephadams.com, and you can find him on Twitter @johnjosephadams.

I’d love to see a biography of Alfred Bester. I don’t know if his life was interesting enough to warrant one, but I do know that he left his literary estate to his bartender when he died, and anyone who does something like that had to have had SOME good real-life stories. (Apparently the bartender didn’t know what to do with the estate, and as a result Bester’s work was out of print for several years, until Byron Preiss rescued it and brought it back to light in the 90s.) Bester also wrote Green Lantern for a while, and created the oft-quoted Green Lantern oath, when he was writing the comic, though I don’t know if there would be any interesting stories surrounding that or his time writing comics. A few years ago, I went on a big Bester kick — I’d gone back to read though his ouvre more completely, and re-read The Stars My Destination (my favorite novel). Then, sometime later, I read the brilliant Tiptree biography by Julie Phillips, and that’s when I first conceived of this desire to read a Bester biography. Given there wasn’t one, I went on a bit of a scavenger hunt, tracking down all the information about Bester I could find, not just online, but in old magazines and the like–looking for interviews or anything that talked about the man himself, as opposed to just his fiction. I never did find much indication that there’d be enough good material to make a biography, but still I wish there was one (or perhaps that Bester had been as interesting in life as his fiction was).

Continue reading

[GUEST INTERVIEW] Prolific Editor John Joseph Adams on Science Fiction, Anthologies, and the Future of Printed and Digital Books and Magazines

Oleg Kazantsev had the opportunity to do an in-depth interview with John Joseph Adams for SF Signal.

John Joseph Adams is the bestselling editor of many anthologies, such as Other Worlds Than These, Armored, Under the Moons of Mars: New Adventures on Barsoom, Brave New Worlds, Wastelands, The Living Dead, The Living Dead 2, By Blood We Live, Federations, The Improbable Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, and The Way of the Wizard. John is a four-time finalist for the Hugo Award and a three-time finalist for the World Fantasy Award. He has been called “the reigning king of the anthology world” by Barnes & Noble, and his books have been lauded as some of the best anthologies of all time. In addition to his anthology work, John is also the editor and publisher of the magazines Lightspeed and Nightmare, and he is the co-host of Wired.com’s The Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast. For more information, visit his website at johnjosephadams.com, and you can find him on Twitter @johnjosephadams.


Oleg Kazantsev: Your personal bio says that The Stars My Destination by Alfred Bester was a turning point in your reading experience, after which “your reading life became all about finding other books like that one.” Does your early reading experience, and this book in particular, still affect your editor’s taste? If so, to what extent?

John Joseph Adams: I’m sure it does, but it’s hard to say how. I mean, I do still very much enjoy deeply damaged (and sometimes disturbed) protagonists, like Gully Foyle.

OK: You refer to yourself as a sci-fi/fantasy editor and reader. What attracts you to this genre?

Continue reading

The SF Signal Podcast (Episode 136): Myke Cole Interviews Anthology Editors John Joseph Adams and James Lowder

In episode 136 of the Hugo Nominated SF Signal Podcast, Myke Cole, author of the military fantasy Shadow Ops: Control Point, sits down to chat about anthologies with best-selling editor and four-time Hugo Award finalist, and three-time World Fantasy Award finalist, John Joseph Adams, and best selling editor and author, finalist for the International Horror Guild Award and the Stoker Award, and five-time winner of the Origins Awards and a silver Ennie Award, James Lowder.

Continue reading

John Joseph Adams Launches New Website for ‘Other Worlds Than These’ Anthology (With Free Fiction!)

Editor John Joseph Adams has launched the website companion for his new (coming next week) anthology Other Worlds Than These.

Here’s what the anthology is about:

What if you could not only travel any location in the world, but to any possible world?

We can all imagine such “other worlds”—be they worlds just slightly different than our own or worlds full of magic and wonder—but it is only in fiction that we can travel to them. From The Wizard of Oz to The Dark Tower, from Philip Pullman’s The Golden Compass to C. S. Lewis’s The Chronicles of Narnia, there is a rich tradition of this kind of fiction, but never before have the best parallel world stories and portal fantasies been collected in a single volume—until now.

Like John’s previous anthology websites, the site for Other Worlds Than These is jam-packed with lots of juicy stuff, like:

…and more.

Stop by and check it out!

TOC: ‘Epic’ Edited by John Joseph Adams

Tachyon has posted the table of contents for the upcoming anthology Epic edited by John Joseph Adams:

There is a sickness in the land. Prophets tell of the fall of empires, the rise of champions. Great beasts stir in vaults beneath the hills, beneath the waves. Armies mass. Gods walk. The world will be torn asunder.

Epic fantasy is storytelling at its biggest and best. From the creation myths and quest sagas of ancient times to the mega-popular fantasy novels of today, these are the stories that express our greatest hopes and fears, that create worlds so rich we long to return to them again and again, and that inspire us with their timeless values of courage and friendship in the face of ultimate evil—tales that transport us to the most ancient realms, and show us the most noble sacrifices, the most astonishing wonders.

Now acclaimed editor John Joseph Adams (Wastelands, The Living Dead) brings you seventeen tales by today’s leading authors of epic fantasy, including George R. R. Martin (A Song of Ice and Fire), Ursula K. Le Guin (Earthsea), Robin Hobb (Realms of Elderlings), Kate Elliott (Crown of Stars), Tad Williams (Of Memory, Sorrow & Thorn), Patrick Rothfuss (The Kingkiller Chronicle), and more.

Return again to lands you’ve loved, or visit magical new worlds. Victory against the coming darkness is never certain, but one thing’s for sure—your adventure will be epic.

And here’s the table of contents…

Continue reading

John Joseph Adams Seeks Funding for ‘Nightmare Magazine’

John Joseph Adams writes in to tell us about a new project, for which he is seeking funding through Kickstarter.

Nightmare Magazine is a monthly magazine of horror and dark fantasy short fiction which will be published both online and in ebook format. This Kickstarter is intended to help fund the first issue and to get the magazine off the ground.

More about the magazine:
Continue reading

TOC: ‘Other Worlds Than These’ Edited by John Joseph Adams

Editor John Joseph Adams has posted the table of contents for his upcoming (July 3, 2012) anthology Other Worlds Than These:

First, here’s the book description:

What if you could not only travel any location in the world, but to any possible world?

We can all imagine such “other worlds”—be they worlds just slightly different than our own or worlds full of magic and wonder—but it is only in fiction that we can travel to them. From The Wonderful Wizard of Oz to The Dark Tower, from The Golden Compass to The Chronicles of Narnia, there is a rich tradition of this kind of fiction, but never before have the best parallel world stories and portal fantasies been collected in a single volume—until now.

And here’s the table of contents (check out that spectacular lineup!):
Continue reading

John Joseph Adams Launches ‘Armored’ Website

Once again, Editor John Joseph Adams has created a great companion website for one of his anthologies. Check out the new site for Armored, his new military science fiction anthology featuring 23 stories.

Among the treasures you’ll find:

EVENT: The New York Review of Science Fiction Readings Presents ‘A Journey to Barsoom’ on March 6th


If you are in the New York City area on Tuesday, March 6th, it’d be worth your time to check out The New York Review of Science Fiction Reading scheduled for that night: A Journey to Barsoom! The event is to help promote John Joseph Adams’ new John Carter anthology Under the Moons of Mars

Press release follows…

Continue reading

Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy Finds a New Home at Wired

If you were only skimming today’s tidbits, you may have missed a bit of noteworthy news: Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy, the excellent podcast hosted by John Joseph Adams and David Barr Kirtley, has found a new home at Wired‘s Underwire blog.

I’m happy to see this. It’s a logical match-up and GGG is a wonderful podcast that deserves more exposure. Congrats to John and David!

Their brand new podcast features a great interview with William Gibson. Go give it a listen.

Be My Victim: John Skipp – Zombies, A Festival of Decay or a Festival in Decay? Pt. 2

This month I’ll continue my conversation with the estimable John Skipp, as we further discuss the zombie and its current reign of the dark fiction realm. Last time, we examined the rise of the zombie, and took a look at how far this venerable creature had come. Now, we’re going to turn our eyes to the future to see where that shambling mass of rot is heading.

Continue reading

TOC: ‘The Living Dead 2′ edited by John Joseph Adams

John Joseph Adams has posted the table of contents for his sequel zombie anthology The Living Dead 2:

  1. “Alone, Together” by Robert Kirkman
  2. “Danger Word” by Steven Barnes & Tananarive Due
  3. “Zombieville” by Paula Stiles
  4. “The Anteroom” by Adam-Troy Castro
  5. “When the Zombies Win” by Karina Sumner-Smith
  6. “Mouja” by Matt London
  7. “Category Five” by Marc Paoletti
  8. “Living with the Dead” by Molly Brown
  9. “Twenty-Three Snapshots of San Francisco” by Seth Lindberg
  10. “The Mexican Bus” by Walter Greatshell
  11. “The Other Side” by Jamie Lackey
  12. “Where the Heart Was” by David J. Schow
  13. “Good People” by David Wellington
  14. “Lost Canyon of the Dead” by Brian Keene
  15. “Pirates vs. Zombies” by Amelia Beamer
  16. “The Crocodiles” by Steven Popkes
  17. “The Skull-Faced City” by David Barr Kirtley
  18. “Obedience” by Brenna Yovanoff
  19. “Steve and Fred” by Max Brooks
  20. “The Rapeworm” by Charlie Finlay
  21. “Everglades” by Mira Grant
  22. “We Now Pause For Station Identification” by Gary Braunbeck
  23. “Reluctance” by Cherie Priest
  24. “Arlene Schabowski Of The Undead” by Mark McLaughlin & Kyra M. Schon
  25. “Zombie Gigolo” by S. G. Browne
  26. “Rural Dead” by Bret Hammond
  27. “The Summer Place” by Bob Fingerman
  28. “The Wrong Grave” by Kelly Link
  29. “The Human Race” by Scott Edelman
  30. “Who We Used to Be” by David Moody
  31. “Therapeutic Intervention” by Rory Harper
  32. “He Said, Laughing” by Simon R. Green
  33. “Last Stand” by Kelley Armstrong
  34. “The Thought War” by Paul McAuley
  35. “Dating in Dead World” by Joe McKinney
  36. “Flotsam & Jetsam” by Carrie Ryan
  37. “Thin Them Out” by Kim Paffenroth, Julia Sevin & RJ Sevin
  38. “Zombie Season” by Catherine MacLeod
  39. “Tameshigiri” by Steven Gould
  40. “Zero Tolerance” by Jonathan Maberry
  41. “And the Next, and the Next ” by Genevieve Valentine
  42. “The Price of a Slice” by John Skipp & Cody Goodfellow
  43. “Are You Trying to Tell Me This is Heaven?” by Sarah Langan

MIND MELD: Who Should Be The Next Grand Master?

[This week’s topic comes from Lawrence Person]

Once a year, the Science Fiction Writers of America (SFWA) names a recipient of the Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award which is then presented at the annual Nebula Awards banquet. The next recipient (for 2009) is Joe Haldeman who joins an already-impressive list of authors.

We asked this week’s panelists:

Q: Who should be the next recipient of the Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award? Why?

Read on to see their replies…

Adam Roberts
Adam Roberts was born two-thirds of the way through the last century; he presently lives a little way west of London, England, with a beautiful wife and two small children. He is a writer with a day-job (professor at Royal Holloway, University of London). The first of these two employments has resulted in eight published sf novels, the most recent being Splinter (Solaris 2007) and Land of the Headless (Victor Gollancz 2007). The second of these has occasioned such critical studies as The Palgrave History of Science Fiction (2006).

I’m staggered that Joanna Russ has never received this particular recognition — she’s a giant of the genre, the author of some of the most important SF of the 20th-century. She hasn’t published much recently (illness has prevented her, I understand), but nevertheless. Russ for 2010, I say: and for 2011 Christopher Priest.

Continue reading