Here’s the cover art and synopsis of the upcoming young adult novel Glaze by Kim Curran, coming May 2014 from Jurassic London. There will also be a limited edition run of 75 copies.

First, the synopsis:
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Dublin-born Kim Curran studied Philosophy at university with the plan of being paid big bucks to think deep thoughts. While that never quite worked out, she did land a job as a junior copywriter with an ad agency a week after graduating. She’s worked in advertising ever since, specialising in writing for video games. Her first book Shift was published in autumn 2012 with the sequel Control out August 2013. You can find her on her website kimcurran.co.uk and on Twitter as @kimecurran.

No One Told Me Women Didn’t Write Science Fiction

No one ever told me women didn’t write science fiction. Or that it might be odd for me to want to. It simply wasn’t an issue. My mother bottle fed us while watching Star Trek. I grew up on Dr Who, Space 1999, Ulysses 31, Back to the Future, E.T, etc.

I was also obsessed with science; with understanding the world around me and spinning tales using whatever snippets of science I had gleaned. My primary school teacher even called me her ‘poet scientist‘ when I was nine, in a strange bit of foreshadowing.

So when it came to reading, it made sense I would reach for the SF shelves. And when it came to writing, the same thing applied. I never stopped to think ‘this isn’t something for a woman.’

In short, I was blissfully unaware that gender even came into it. So to have arrived in the community of SF writers and readers and realised there is a battle raging between the genders, well, it came as a bit of a shock.
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[Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]

The first author I ever talked to was John Scalzi. I emailed him after reading The Ghost Brigades to tell him how much I loved the series and hoped to one day see it adapted as a video game. I may never get to play as a green-skinned Colonial Defense Forces soldier, wielding the versatile MP-35 and fighting a variety of aliens – but Scalzi is developing a First Person Shooter called Morning Star, with Industrial Toys (a studio formed by Alex Seropian of Bungie fame). As an avid reader and gamer there are plenty of books I’d love to see transformed into games – a real time strategy game based off of John Ringo’s Legacy of Aldenata series, Richard Kadrey’s Sandman Slim as an action-adventure hack n’ slash title à la Devil May Cry, or a crazy colorful role playing game set in the world of James Maxey’s Greatshadow. But enough about the books I want to see transformed into video games, let’s ask some professionals for their opinions!

We asked this week’s panelists…

Q: What books do you think would make awesome games? What game mechanics might they feature?

Here’s what they said…

Scott Lynch
Born in St. Paul, Minnesota in 1978, Scott Lynch is the author of the Gentleman Bastard sequence of fantasy crime novels, which began with The Lies of Locke Lamora and continues with Red Seas Under Red Skies and the forthcoming The Republic of Thieves. His work has been published in more than fifteen languages and twenty countries, and he was a World Fantasy Award finalist in the Best Novel category in 2007. Scott currently lives in Wisconsin and has been a volunteer firefighter since 2005.

This is possibly the nerdiest question I’ve been asked in a while, and I’ll do my best to avoid restraint in my answers.
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Strange Chemistry has just completed the cover of Kim Curran’s upcoming novel Control, the sequel to Shift that’s due to be published on August 6th, 2013. The cover features art by Larry Rostant. (There’s a much larger version after the jump!)

Here’s the synopsis of Control:

Scott Tyler is not like other teenagers. With a single thought he can alter reality around him. And he can stop anyone else from doing the same.

That’s why he’s so important to ARES, the secret government agency that regulates other kids like him: Shifters.

They’ve sent him on a mission. To track down the enigmatic Frank Anderson. An ex-Shifter who runs a project for unusual kids – as if the ability to change your every decision wasn’t unusual enough. But Anderson and the kids have a dark secret. One that Scott is determined to discover.

As his obsession with discovering the truth takes him further away from anyone he cares about, his grip on reality starts to weaken. Scott realizes if he can’t control his choices, they’ll control him.

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REVIEW: Shift by Kim Curran

REVIEW SUMMARY: A fun sci-fi debut!

MY RATING:

BRIEF SYNOPSIS: Unhappy teen Scott Tyler finds out he can shift, undoing any decision he’s ever made. He’s not the only one with the talent, though, and being “special” might not be everything he’s hoped for, after all.

MY REVIEW:
PROS: Fast-paced; lots of twists and turns.
CONS: Light on character development.
BOTTOM LINE: Shift was a fun, fast, twisty sci-fi debut that will appeal to teens and especially (hopefully) reluctant readers.

Scott Tyler, home life a shambles, outlook for the future decidedly pessimistic, is out with his friends one night when he notices the lovely Aubrey Jones and decides to show off a bit by scaling The Pylon. In short order he finds himself flat on his back and with no real memory of how he got there. Before he knows it, Aubrey is in his face, threatening him with arrest for unauthorized shifting. He has no idea what she’s talking about, but he soon finds out when she takes him to the local Shifter hangout. If you’re thinking shapeshifters, think again.
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