This week at the Kirkus Review blog, I get all list-y and look at some science fiction and fantasy books that might appeal to readers of classic literature.

From the article:

For some readers, science fiction and fantasy is a hard sell. The sf/f labels come with the baggage of preconceived notions about what it means. I’ve said this before, but it bears repeating: Science fiction is not always about spaceships and fantasy is not always about dragons. Science fiction and fantasy provide just as much literary range as classic literature. In fact, several works of sf/f key off of classic literature. So, with the aim of introducing readers to sf/f, here’s a list of suggestions aimed at readers of classic literature to help introduce them to the wonderful world of science fiction and fantasy.

Check out 5 Science Fiction an Fantasy Reads for Lovers of Classic Literature over on the Kirkus Reviews blog.

Yeah, a few days late with this post…but last week at the Kirkus Review blog, I look at the latest round of speculative fiction books turning into movies.

Check out Read Them Now, Watch Them Later: Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Adaptation Watch over on the Kirkus Reviews blog.

Check it out!

The Transformation of George R.R. Martin

I’ve been a fan of Game of Thrones since I first caught it a couple of years ago, and I’ve been impressed with the HBO series as I’ve continued to watch. When Season 1 hit, I pulled out my copies of A Song of Ice and Fire and started the first book, alternatively reading and watching the show. I’ve found the books to be a trial to get through, but I’ve ultimately enjoyed them.

I’ve found Martin’s rise to real fame in the last couple of years to be an interesting thing to watch, and it’s equally as interesting to look back and remember that he was a fairly prominent SF author throughout the 70s and 80s, and with this past weekend’s release of Season 4, it’s a good time to look back on his roots.

Go read The Transformation of George R.R. Martin over on the Kirkus Reviews Blog.

This week at the Kirkus Review blog, I name my Best Bets for Speculative Fiction Reads for April 2014.

Are these the books that stoke your readerly flame, too?

Check it out!

The Meteoric Rise and Fall of Gnome Press

In my day job, I work with MBA students, and in the time that I’ve been doing that (and working at my regular job), I’ve gained a certain appreciation for how businesses function. When it comes to researching the column, looking at how a business functions has a certain appeal, especially since a major, unspoken element of SF History is really a sort of business history.

An excellent case in point is the rise and fall of a small, independent publisher, Gnome Press, which existed for just over a decade in the middle of the 20th Century. They published some of the genre’s greatest authors, but ultimately failed, overtaken by their own inability to sell books and by changes in the marketplace. Gnome is an interesting business to study, because it carries with it some important lessons.

Read The Meteoric Rise and Fall of Gnome Press over on the Kirkus Reviews Blog.

Science fiction, a literature that often shows with the world of tomorrow will look like, is often credited with predicting the future. But does it really?

Over at the Kirkus Reviews Blog this week, I conclude my look at preductions when I ask Science Fiction Predictions: Truth or Misconception?

Check it out.

Ghosted: Haunted Heist

Over on the Kirkus Reviews Blog, I have a new post up on Ghosted Volume One: Haunted Heist from Image comics.

From the post:

Imagine Ocean’s Eleven if the heist was all about the supernatural, specifically, stealing a ghost.  In Ghosted: Haunted Heist (978-1607068365) by Joshua Williamson and Goran Sudzuka, Jackson T. Winters is tasked with that very mission: steal a ghost.   Continuing the Ocean’s Eleven comparison, imagine if during the middle of that movie, everyone except Clooney’s character was killed, and he ended up in prison.  Then someone broke him out of prison, dragged him to a rich, possibly insane, multi-millionaire collector of the supernatural, who offers him his freedom in exchange for the one thing that will make his collection the envy of his peers: a ghost.

Click over to the Kirkus Reviews Blog to read the rest of the post.

Science fiction, a literature that often shows with the world of tomorrow will look like, is often credited with predicting the future. But does it really?

Over at the Kirkus Reviews Blog this week, I take a look at Science Fiction Predictions: Truth or Misconception?

Check it out.

The Innumerable Short Stories of Theodore Sturgeon

One of the stories that remains a favorite for me is Theodore Sturgeon’s “Microcosmic God”, which I tore through when I received a copy of the Science Fiction Hall of Fame way back in High School. Sturgeon became an author that I’d turn to pretty quickly whenever I picked up another anthology, and I’ve generally enjoyed all of the stories I’ve read from him.

Sturgeon is someone who’s popped up a bit in the column already, and he’s been someone I’ve been wanting to write about for a while now. He left an enormous footprint within the SF/F short fiction genre, and his work really ran counter to the largely conservative-leaning authors and stories that had been published by Campbell & imitators.

Go read The Innumerable Short Stories of Theodore Sturgeon over on the Kirkus Reviews Blog.

Science Fiction Merry-Go-Round!

One of the things I love about science fiction is the diversity of stories encompassed by the sf label. Of course, that doesn’t stop us from applying numerous, more detailed labels to categorize stories,

Over at the Kirkus Reviews Blog this week, I take a look at a slew of books on the Science Fiction Merry-Go-Round!

Check it out.

There used to be a time when genre fanboys like myself would whine about the lack of films based on books. That situation has changed quite a bit.

Over at the Kirkus Reviews Blog this week, I take a look at the latest Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Adaptations.

Check it out.

Another month, another slew of sf/f/h books…

Over at the Kirkus Reviews Blog this week, I take a look at the Best Speculative Fiction Books Picks for March.

Check it out.

Did you ever read a book…and then mull the book over in your mind for a bit….and then go about your daily life…and days/months/years go by and you’re still thinking about the book?

I do.

This week at the Kirkus Reviews Blog, I ask: What Books Have Stayed With You Long After You Finished Reading Them?

Check it out.

The Big Ideas of James Blish

The first Blish story I read was “Surface Tension” in the Science Fiction Hall of Fame anthology while in High School. While there’s certainly some issues with the anthology, it’s a solid collection of short fiction. Blish isn’t an author I’ve read extensively, but I remember him popping up frequently in the various anthologies I read over the years.

With Blish, we’re starting to move into an era of really interesting authors, just slightly removed from Campbell’s reign over the Golden Age, and as authors began to explore a variety of interesting topics in the growing novel market.

Go read The Big Ideas of James Blish over on Kirkus Reviews.

Over at the Kirkus Reviews blog this week, I look at the latest batch of films being turned into television and film adaptations.

Check out New Thrillers That Are More Than They Appear. IF YOU DARE! [Insert ominous music here...]

Alan Moore’s Nemo: Heart of Ice

This week on the Kirkus Reviews blog, I take a look at Alan Moore’s Nemo: Heart of Ice.

From the post:

Moore revisits the world he created in The League of Extraordinary Gentleman in a new book, Nemo: Heart of Ice, which focuses on Janni Dakkar, daughter of Captain Nemo, and her trek across Antarctica to prove herself by recreating Nemo’s own Antarctic expedition. Moore draws from several sources, including H.P. Lovercraft, to create a dark and mysterious continent full of dangers and madness. As a character, Janni feels the weight of the Nemo name and legacy set squarely on her shoulders, and struggles throughout the book to come to terms with that.

Click on over to the Kirkus Blog to read the rest of the review.

Over at the Kirkus Reviews blog this week, I look at a few new books that are undeniably science fiction, but are not overtly marketed as such.

Check out New Thrillers That Are More Than They Appear.

Arthur C. Clarke, Proselytizer of Space

A while ago, I had some grand idea of doing a parallel column for another website on the history of SF film, but quickly found that I didn’t have the time or background to really get into it. I started writing an inaugural piece on – you guessed it – 2001: A Space Odyssey, before quickly realizing that I was really writing a column about the book.

There’s a lot out on Clarke, more than most of the authors I typically write about. As a result, this column’s quite a bit longer than what I usually put together.

There’s a lot of tie-in novels out there, from all the major franchises, but typically, the books come as a result of the film, or there’s a film based on the book. Far less common is when the book and film are created simultaneously, as is the case with Clarke’s book. It’s not his best work, but it’s probably his most visible.

Go read Arthur C. Clarke, Proselytizer of Space over on the Kirkus Reviews blog.

Over at the Kirkus Reviews blog this week, I name my picks for the most promising speculative fiction books coming out next month.

Check out Best Bets for Speculative Fiction Books – February 2014.

Today at Kirkus: A Review of Lazarus One

This week on the Kirkus Reviews Blog, I take a look at Lazarus One from Image Comics.

From the post:

In the future, the world is split not into countries, but fiefdoms controlled by the Families.  The human population is divided into three segments: Family, who control everything, Serfs who have the skills and intelligence necessary to serve and be useful to the Family, and the Waste, who serve no purpose at all.  Each Family has one member who is trained to be something more.  Warrior, messenger, protector, envoy – whatever the situation calls for, the Family Lazarus is there to further the Family’s ends, and protect them from all threats, internal and external.  The Lazarus can be shot, cut, beaten, blown up, take an enormous about of damage, and walk away – eventually.  Their bodies can heal themselves, bones can reset and nit, cuts close, bruises fade.  A Lazarus is nearly indestructible.

Click over to the Kirkus Reviews Blog to read the rest of the review.

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