Editor Mike Allen has posted the the table of contents for the final print issue of Mythic Delirium — a retrospective covering the first 11 years of our 16-year life span.

Here’s the table of contents…
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Mythic Delirium has posted the table of contents for the next issue:

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TOC: Mythic Delirium 0.3 edited by Mike Allen

Mythic Delirium has posted the table of contents for the next issue:

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Mike Allen‘s first novel, The Black Fire Concerto, came out in July from Haunted Stars Publishing. Tanith Lee, this year’s recipient of the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement, calls the book “a prize for the multitude of fans who relish strong Grand Guignol with their sword and sorcery.” By day, Mike works as the arts columnist for The Roanoke Times. His horror tale “The Button Bin” was a finalist for the Nebula Award for Best Short Story. He’s also the editor of the critically-acclaimed Clockwork Phoenix anthologies — the latest volume, Clockwork Phoenix 4, was funded by a $10,000 Kickstarter — and the fiction and poetry webzine Mythic Delirium.

5 Things You Didn’t Know About THE BLACK FIRE CONCERTO

by Mike Allen

Hello, folks! Thanks for reading. When John DeNardo offered me the chance to write a guest post about my first novel, The Black Fire Concerto — the story of a pair of traveling musicians battling ghouls and sorcerers in a grim post-apocalyptic world — I polled friends and colleagues about what topics would be best to talk about. In foolhardy fashion, I’m going to tackle just about all of them, because they all intertwine. Let’s start with how this book came to be published.
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MIND MELD: Our Favorite Women Horror Writers

[Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]

Inspired by such so-called “Greatest Horror Writers” lists as this and this — which include zero women — I asked our esteemed panel the following questions…

Q: Who are your favorite women horror writers? Which current women horror writers deserve more attention?
Ann VanderMeer
The founder of the award-winning Buzzcity Press, Ann VanderMeer currently serves as an acquiring fiction editor for Tor.com, Cheeky Frawg Books, and weirdfictionreview.com. She was the editor-in-chief for Weird Tales for five years, during which time she was nominated three times for the Hugo Award, winning one. Along with nominations for the Shirley Jackson Award, she also has won a World Fantasy Award and a British Fantasy Award for co-editing The Weird: A Compendium of Strange and Dark Stories. Other projects have included Best American Fantasy, three Steampunk anthologies, and a humor book, The Kosher Guide to Imaginary Animals. Her latest anthologies include Steampunk III: Steampunk Revolution, The Time Traveler’s Almanac, and an as-yet unnamed anthology of feminist speculative fiction.

Here are some of my favorite women writers who write horror:

  • Gertrude Barrows Bennett (writing as Francis Stevens) – She wrote a number of uncanny stories in the early 20th century and has been called “the woman who invented dark fantasy.” Indeed, it has been said that her fiction was a huge influence on H.P. Lovecraft. Although not all of Stevens’ work has dated well, she was the first American woman to have her weird fiction widely published and acclaimed.
  • C.L. Moore – Catherine L. Moore was an American science fiction and fantasy writer, most often known as C.L. Moore. She was one of the first women to write in either genre, and paved the way for many other female speculative fiction writers. Her earliest stories appeared in Weird Tales and a lot of her work was very dark, hence I add her to this list.
  • Daphne du Maurier – Although her work was incredibly dark, she was still a very popular writer during her lifetime. Many of her most prominent works have been adapted into movies. My favorite is “The Birds” from Alfred Hitchcock. Although her background could be considered more from the gothic side of fiction, I find her work very dark and disturbing.

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TOC: Mythic Delirium 0.2 (Digital) and #29 (Print) edited by Mike Allen

Mythic Delirium has posted the table of contents for the next digital (0.2) and print (#29) issues:
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TOC: Mythic Delirium 0.1 edited by Mike Allen

The final story from Mythic Delirium 0.1 (with cover art by Danielle Tunstall) has been posted online:

Cover & Synopsis: “The Black Fire Concerto” by Mike Allen

Mike Allen has posted the cover art and synopsis of his upcoming book The Black Fire Concerto.

Here’s the synopsis:
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TOC: Mythic Delirium #28 Edited by Mike Allen

Mike Allen has posted the table of contents for issue #28 of Mythic Delirium:

  • Editorial: Myths and Delusions
  • “The Theatre Golems” by Dominik Parisien
  • “Mice” by Beth Cato
  • “Grant Proposal” by Alexandra Seidel
  • “Wheels” by Adele Gardner
  • “The Motor Prayer” by Donald Raymond
  • “The Princess Becomes a Prophet” by Jeannine Hall Gailey
  • “Gleaming” by Mari Ness
  • “The Beast” by Rachel Manija Brown
  • “skin” by Lynn Hardaker
  • “Circe in Manhattan” by Wendy Howe
  • “Persephone Set Free” by Sofia Samatar
  • “Rare Annie” by Caitlyn Paxson
  • “How to Bring Your Dead Lover Back” by KL Pereira
  • “Día de los Muertos” by F.J. Bergmann
  • “The Green Green Rain” by Neile Graham
  • “Doomcall” by Alistair Rennie
  • “The Ceremony of Innocence” by Sonya Taaffe
  • “Maud Gonne, After” by Alicia Cole
  • “The Serpent Explains the Nature of Tricksters to His Wife” by Ruthanna Emrys
  • “The Last Siren” by Andrew Gilstrap
  • “Revising Horror (The Wrong Mouth)” by David Sandner

Mythic Delirium Reborn

Mike Allen writes that a new Mythic Delirium is coming!

Sez editor Mike Allen:
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TOC: ‘Clockwork Phoenix 4′ Edited by Mike Allen


Editor Mike Allen has posted the table of contents for his upcoming anthology Clockwork Phoenix 4:

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Mike Allen is the editor and publisher of the anthology series Clockwork Phoenix and the poetry journal Mythic Delirium. He was a Nebula Award finalist in 2009 for his short story “The Button Bin,” and his first collection of short fiction, The Button Bin And Other Horrors, is forthcoming from Apex Books. He and his artist wife Anita live in Roanoke, Va., where he writes the arts column for the daily newspaper.

Funding ‘Clockwork Phoenix 4′ Through Kickstarter

One of the wonderful things about the genre community, if you’re a creative type, is if you have an idea and it’s not something you could ever get a major publishing house to line up behind, you can do it yourself and folks respect you for it. Heck, it’s almost expected.

So how did I end up editing the Clockwork Phoenix trilogy, and why have I launched a Kickstarter for a volume four?
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TOC: ‘Mythic Delirium 27′ Edited by Mike Allen

Mike Allen has posted the table of contents for Mythic Delirium 27:

  1. “Carve Me” by Alex Dally MacFarlane
  2. “Sonnet 20: From Nikola Tesla’s Clockwork Assistant to Thomas Edison’s Automaton” by Ken Liu
  3. “What Would You Think” by Theodora Goss
  4. “She Fell in Love with Winter” by S. Brackett Robertson
  5. “Vivian to Merlin” by Theodora Goss
  6. “The Tears of Sigrune” by Anna Sykora
  7. “The Gardener” by Sandi Leibowitz
  8. “The Architecture of Grief” by Rachel Swirsky
  9. “Kalligeneia 2012″ by Sonya Taaffe
  10. “The Bones of the Girl Musicians” by Sandi Leibowitz
  11. “More” by Sofía Rhei (translated into English by Lawrence Schimel)
  12. “The Oracle Never Dances” by Shira Lipkin
  13. “The Magic Window” by Sofía Rhei (translated into English by Lawrence Schimel)
  14. “The Light of Dreams” by Alexandra Seidel
  15. “The Pied Piper vs. the Sirens” by Gwynne Garfinkle
  16. “Ereshkigal’s Proposal to Hades” by Shira Lipkin
  17. “Plucked from the Horo” by Rose Lemberg
  18. “My Grandson Never Dreams Of Dragons” by Lida Broadhurst

TOC: Clockwork Phoenix 3 edited by Mike Allen

Editor Mike Allen has posted the list of stories appearing in his upcoming anthology, Clockwork Phoenix 3 (order as yet to be determined):

  • “The Gospel of Nachash” by Marie Brennan
  • “Crow Voodoo” by Georgina Bruce
  • “Braiding the Ghosts” by C.S.E. Cooney
  • “Hell Friend” by Gemma Files
  • “Lucyna’s Gaze” by Gregory Frost
  • “Where Shadows Go at Low Midnight” by John Grant ([info]realthog )
  • “Dragons of America” by Stacey Hirons
  • “Your Name Is Eve” by Michael M. Jones
  • “Fold” by Tanith Lee
  • “Eyes of Carven Emerald” by Shweta Narayan
  • “Lineage” by Kenneth Schneyer
  • “Tomorrow Is Saint Valentine’s Day” by Tori Truslow
  • “Murder in Metachronopolis” by John C. Wright
  • “Surrogates” by Cat Rambo
  • “To Seek Her Fortune” by Nicole Kornher-Stace

[Note 12/14/09: updated based on latest info]

SF Tidbits for 10/7/09

TIP: Follow SF Signal on Twitter and Facebook for additional tidbits not posted here!

Short fiction anthologies come in many flavors: some contain original fiction and some are comprised of reprints; they can be themed or non-themed; they may restrict themselves to a certain sub-genre of speculative fiction… But one thing they all have in common is that it’s Editors that put them together.

Continuing from Part 1 last week, we asked a handful of Editors the following question:

Q: Can you describe what goes on behind the scenes – from conception to publication — when creating a short fiction anthology?

Read on to see their illuminating responses (and check out Part 3 when you’re done!) …

James Patrick Kelly & John Kessel
James Patrick Kelly is the author of a slew of novels and short stories including Burn, Look Into the Sun, Strange But Not A Stranger, Think Like A Dinosaur And Other Stories, and The Wreck of the Godspeed. His numerous short works include the Hugo Award-winning “Think Like A Dinosaur” and “Ten to the Sixteenth to One”. He is also co-editor with John Kessel of three anthologies: Feeling Very Strange: The Slipstream Anthology, Rewired: The Post-Cyberpunk Anthology, and the upcoming The Secret History of Science Fiction. He also writes a column for Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine.
John Kessel teaches literature at North Carolina State University. He has published numerous books and short stories over the years and he is a Nebula Award winner for his story “Pride and Prometheus.” His latest book is the short story collection The Baum Plan for Financial Independence and Other Stories. John is also co-editor with James Patrick Kelly of three anthologies: Feeling Very Strange: The Slipstream Anthology, Rewired: The Post-Cyberpunk Anthology, and the upcoming The Secret History of Science Fiction.

We have edited three reprint anthologies; the genesis of each was different. Jacob Weisman at Tachyon Publications approached Jim to do a slipstream book and he enlisted John as his co-editor; the result was Feeling Very Strange: The Slipstream Anthology. We proposed a book about post-cyberpunk and Jacob greenlighted Rewired: The Post-Cyberpunk Anthology. And it was Jacob and the perspicacious Bernie Goodman who suggested the idea for The Secret History Of Science Fiction; the book is due out next month.

We’ve a long history of collaboration and we’ve shared a similar vision for these reprint anthologies. In each of them we were trying to put forward an argument about the recent history of the genre. So we first had to gather our thoughts about slipstream and post-cyberpunk and the divide between mainstream and genre sf. Creating reprint anthologies like these involves figuring out what we think about a subject, or what we can credibly say about it. Selecting the stories has involved a couple of methods: (1) we decided on who we wanted in the book and then read intensively for stories that best illustrated our thesis, and (2) we decided what kind of stories we wanted and then cast the net widely to see who might have written the sort of thing we needed to support our thesis. In each of the books we have had some disagreements that have involved negotiations between us, and the final table of contents has been affected by practical considerations that made the end result different from our initial intentions.

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SF Tidbits for 9/14/09

TIP: Follow SF Signal on Twitter and Facebook for additional tidbits not posted here!

SF Tidbits for 9/12/09

TIP: Follow SF Signal on Twitter and Facebook for additional tidbits not posted here!