The final installment of my Best Podcast Fiction of All Time List, is finally here, revealing the top ten. You can find  the individual posts as they were posted #41-50 here,  #31-40 here,  #21-30 here, and #11-20 here.  For those who just want to get to the Top Ten already I’ve listed that first.  For ease of reference, I’ve also included the entire list of fifty at the bottom of the post so if you want to refer people to the list, you can just link here.

These are (my opinion of) what is the best of the best, the most epic of the most epic.  Load them all up and have an awesome road trip, or ration them out over months of liistening.

I would love if other fiction podcast fans would comment here and say what their own favorites are and why.

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Shaking their sullen heads at the fact that June marks the first anniversary of the Three Hoarsemen Podcast, John E. O. Stevens, Fred Kiesche and Jeff Patterson LAUGH at the cruel passage of time and ride out for another adventure. This time around they ask the intrepid Kate Sherrod to take a break from enduring the floods in Wyoming and saddle up with them for a discussion on the works of Octavia Butler.

After that, they give their thoughts on Andy Weir’s The Martian, and scrutinize the truly staggering number of books and comics that have passed their eyes since last they met.

Also, because it’s a cruel summer, the Hoarsemen remember Jay Lake, and discuss Sarah Chorn’s stunning (and heartbreaking) column about what is important when faced with cancer.

1 hr 24 Min. In STEREO!

Listen below…

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Here at The Completist I like to highlight books that may have been sitting for a while on the bookshelves; to ensure good books from a few years ago (and more) aren’t lost in the shuffle of everybody trying to read the HOT! NEW! RELEASES! all the cool kids are reading. (Not that good books aren’t being published now, mind.) It’s been quite a while since I read these books, but they remain important and are absolutely essential reading for so many reasons.

Most people who have been reading Science Fiction and Fantasy for a significant amount of time know of Octavia E. Butler and what is perhaps her most famous series, which has gone by a couple of different names: Xenogenesis or Lilith’s Brood. Butler is one of the most recognized writers in the genre, and probably the most recognizable black woman to write in the genre. She was championed by Harlan Ellison, she won both the Hugo and Nebula Award and in 1995 she became the first science fiction writer to receive the MacArthur Fellowship. This series is a landmark in the alien first contact story and provides a very plausible biological thrust in the human/alien commingling.

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Hey, eBook readers!

Amazon’s Kindle daily deal today is Kindred by Octavia Butler, which is selling for $2.99!

Here’s the description:

Dana, a modern black woman, is celebrating her twenty-sixth birthday with her new husband when she is snatched abruptly from her home in California and transported to the antebellum South. Rufus, the white son of a plantation owner, is drowning, and Dana has been summoned to save him. Dana is drawn back repeatedly through time to the slave quarters, and each time the stay grows longer, more arduous, and more dangerous until it is uncertain whether or not Dana’s life will end, long before it has a chance to begin.

Note: Kindle books can be read on by downloading the Kindle software for computers and smartphones, or directly on a Kindle device.

This deal is also available for the Nook platform. (The iTunes version is currently sitting at $14.99.)

(Note: this is part of a series in which I discuss works of the contributors to The Other Half of the Sky. Links to other entries in the series appear at the end of this discussion.)

Bloodchildren is a collection of eleven stories by the recipients of the Carl Brandon scholarship, established in Octavia Butler’s honor to enable SFF writers of color to attend one of the Clarion workshops. The stories were edited by Nisi Shawl, herself a practitioner of many literary arts; they’re front-ended by a haunting cover by Laurie Toby Edison, by moving testimonials from Nalo Hopkinson and Vonda McIntyre and by Butler’s story “Speech Sounds”.

The collection is titled after Butler’s groundbreaking story “Bloodchild”, one of the most original and disquieting explorations of interspecies contact: spacefaring humans stranded on a planet with its own advanced sentient species have been reduced to breeding vessels along the lines of hosts for parasitic wasps or the Alien über-predator, though they generally survive the ordeal. Men are preferred as incubators so that women can produce more breeders, although bonds of reciprocal need, loyalty and affection have slowly developed between humans and their native masters.
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YouTube user Th9Dave has been posting some gems lately. In addition to the recent audio memorial of
Charles Beaumont by Harlan Ellison, Richard Matheson, Roger Anker, and Chris Beaumont, he’s posted even more. These come from Hour 25, a radio program focusing on science fiction, fantasy, and science that ran from 1972 to 2000. It has been hosted at various times by Mike Hodel, Harlan Ellison, Steven Barnes, Arthur Byron Cover, and J. Michael Straczynski.

Below you can find audio interview snippets with Steven Barnes, Octavia Butler, Terry Dowling, David Gerrold, Tim Powers and Jim Blaylock, and Robert Silverberg.

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SF Tidbits for 10/13/09

TIP: Follow SF Signal on Twitter and Facebook for additional tidbits not posted here!
Note:: The arrival of relatives is imminent! Posting (especially Tidbit posting) may be light for the next 10 days or so.)

SF Tidbits for 10/3/09

TIP: Follow SF Signal on Twitter and Facebook for additional tidbits not posted here!

Here are some clips of Octavia Butler. This is from a panel discussion at UCLA in 2002, moderated by Arthur Cover. The full panel is on Frank Herbert’s Dune DVD.

[via The World in the Satin Bag]