Joshua Palmatier has posted the table of contents for his upcoming kickstarted anthology Clockwork Universe: Steampunk vs. Aliens:

  1. “The Cavorite Job” by Ian Tregillis
  2. “Gracie’s Fire” by Leah Cutter
  3. “Quinta Essentia” by Bradley P. Beaulieu
  4. “When Comrade Ekaterina Died for the Motherland” by J.R. Hargenrader
  5. “A Clockwork Alien” by Gini Koch
  6. “Heart of the Empire” by Jason Palmatier
  7. “The Red Queen and the White” by C.B. Pratt
  8. “The Wizard of Woodrow Park” by Jean Marie Ward
  9. “Of War and Wings” by Tansy Rayner Roberts
  10. “Airship Down: A Sound and Fury Adventure” by Gail Z. Martin & Larry N. Martin
  11. “Steamsuit” by David J. Fortier
  12. “Fingers of Steam, Veins of Gold” by Brad Hafford
  13. “Heart of Clockwork” by S.C. Butler
  14. “Lady Antheia’s Guide to Horticultural Warfare” by Seanan McGuire

There’s also an Introduction by Patricia Bray.

[via Tansy Rayner Roberts]

MIND MELD: Reading, Writing and Revisions

[Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]

This week we asked about Revisions. I’ve come across a couple of examples lately of authors reissuing books with significant changes from the initial publication, or changing it relatively late in the initial publication process. With the rise of ebooks, the potential for rolling revisions to books is a very real possibility.

We asked this week’s panelists the following:

Q: As a reader and as a writer, how do you feel about the practice of revising books after they have been published (or at least have reached the ARC stage)? How much revision goes into your writing process? (How clean are your drafts)?

This is what they had to say…

Lucy Snyder
Lucy Snyder is the Bram Stoker Award-winning author of the novels Spellbent, Shotgun Sorceress, Switchblade Goddess, and the collections Sparks and Shadows, Chimeric Machines, and Installing Linux on a Dead Badger. Her writing has appeared in Strange Horizons, Weird Tales, Hellbound Hearts, Dark Faith, Chiaroscuro, GUD, and Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet. You can learn more about her at www.lucysnyder.com.

I’m a measure-twice, cut-once kind of writer; I do a lot of note-taking and thinking before I start a project. I try to have a plot destination in mind, although sometimes that will change — if the story wants to go someplace other than what I planned I’m happy to take that detour. But the upshot is I seldom start a story with no clue where I’m going, and consequently I only rarely have to make major changes to a story or novel. I do my very best to turn in clean, ready-to-publish drafts to my editors. But typos and continuity errors happen, so fixing them is part of the editorial process.
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SF Tidbits for 8/12/09

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