Rena Mason is the Bram Stoker Award-winning author of The Evolutionist, a mash up of horror/sci-fi and East End Girls, a horror/historical fiction novella. A former operating room nurse and longtime fan of horror, science fiction, science, history, historical fiction, mysteries, and thrillers, she began writing to mash up those genres and experiences in stories revolving around everyday life. An avid SCUBA diver since 1988, she has traveled the world and also enjoys incorporating those experiences into her stories. She currently resides in Las Vegas, Nevada with her family. She’s on Twitter as @RenaMason88, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Horror and Science Fiction: Not Such Strange Bedfellows After All

I read a blog recently where a hardcore sci-fi author admittedly wrote a scary story but refused to acknowledge that it was also a horror story. I didn’t understand why, and the author never explained his reasoning in the blog. My assumption was that this author didn’t want that redheaded-stepchild label of “horror” tagged onto his work. As a reader of many genres, horror in particular, it disappointed me that he didn’t include the horror label in his description. I’d be more likely to read and buy more sci-fi if it had the horror label connected with it.

Then in the horror community, there are publishers/readers who won’t accept/read any sci-fi related horror submissions/stories. You mention the word “other planet” or “alien” and the pitch/book is over/put down. I don’t get this either, because I think it opens up broader markets/horror story perspectives, and most horror writers who pitch sci-fi stories to horror publishers tend to write more on the horror side and a soft sci-fi versus the traditional hard sci-fi anyway.
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[Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]

The Bram Stoker Award final ballot was recently announced, reminding me why horror as a genre is so much fun, so in that spirit, I asked our panel these questions:

Q: What first piqued your interest in horror, and why do you enjoy writing in the genre? What direction do you see the genre taking in the future, and who are a few of your favorite horror writers, books, or stories?

Here’s what they had to say…

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