Tag Archives: S.G. Browne

Coming Soon: LESS THAN HERO by S.G. Browne

Here’s the cover and synopsis for the upcoming superhero novel Less Than Hero by S.G. Browne.

Here’s the synopsis:
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[GUEST POST] S.G. Browne on The Writing Life


S.G. Browne is the author of the novels Big Egos, Lucky Bastard, Fated, Breathers, and the forthcoming Super Duper, as well as the novella I Saw Zombies Eating Santa Claus and the ebook collection Shooting Monkeys in a Barrel. He’s a Guinness aficionado, ice cream snob, and a sucker for It’s a Wonderful Life. He lives in San Francisco.

The Writing Life: We Are Not Alone

by S.G. Browne

“The mind of a writer can be a truly terrifying thing: isolated, neurotic, caffeine-addled, crippled by procrastination and consumed by feelings of panic, self-loathing, and soul-crushing inadequacy. And that’s on a good day.”

The above quote was taken from Robert De Niro’s presentation for the screenwriting category at the 2014 Academy Awards. I don’t know who wrote the words that De Niro spoke but whoever it was nailed writers to the post.
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[GUEST POST] S.G. Browne’s Confessions of a Non-Genre Genre Author

S.G. Browne is the author of the novels Breathers, Fated, Lucky Bastard, and Big Egos, as well as the novella I Saw Zombies Eating Santa Claus. His short story collection, Shooting Monkeys in a Barrel, is available as an eBook.

Confessions of a Non-Genre Genre Author

by S.G. Browne

They say confession is good for the soul. In that case, I had a Rick Springfield mullet in high school, I was handcuffed naked to an anchor in college, and I watch Waterworld every time it plays on cable.

Also, while I don’t consider myself a genre author, I write in multiple genres.

Not that there’s anything wrong with being a genre author. I have numerous friends who are authors of horror, mystery, and sci-fi. And I cut my teeth reading and writing supernatural horror ala King, Straub, and McCammon in the late 80s and early 90s. It’s just that I have a love/hate relationship with labels. And when it comes to fiction, labeling starts with genre.
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