Steve Berman has sent us the table of contents for his upcoming themed anthology Suffered from the Night: Queering Stoker’s Dracula, coming in October from Lethe Press.

Who is one of the most filmed, most admired characters in English Literature? Yes, Sherlock Holmes. And Lethe Press did release an anthology of queer-themed Holmesian fiction, A Study in Lavender. Well, we’re taking on the next such character in a forthcoming anthology Suffered from the Night: Queering Stoker’s Dracula. Featuring many talented authors–such as Stoker and Lambda Literary Award winner Lee Thomas, multiple Shirley Jackson Award winner Laird Barron, acclaimed writer Livia Llewellyn, Pauline Reage Novel Award winner Jeff Mann–this book offers a unique retelling and aftermath tales to Stoker’s infamous novel. Edited by Steve Berman, owner of the foremost publisher of queer speculative fiction, Lethe Press.

Here’s the table of contents…
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[Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]

June is LGBT Pride Month, so we thought a Mind Meld on LGBT themes in Fantasy and SF would be perfect, and asked some authors to send some recommendations our way!

Q: LGBT themes and characters have, thankfully, enjoyed an emergence in speculative fiction the past few years, and we’d love to know who some of your favorite LGBT authors, stories, and novels are, and why?

Here’s what they said…

Delia Sherman
Delia Sherman is a fantasy writer and editor. Her novel The Porcelain Dove won the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award. She was born in Tokyo and brought up in New York City. She earned a PhD in Renaissance studies at Brown University and taught at Boston and North-eastern universities. She is the author of the novels Through a Brazen Mirror, The Porcelain Dove (a Mythopoeic Award winner), and Changeling. Sherman co-founded the Interstitial Arts Foundation, dedicated to promoting art that crosses genre borders. She lives in New York City with her wife and sometime collaborator, Ellen Kushner

I like reading about worlds in which society takes no stand against same-sex or even multiple partners, where the gender of a character’s sexual desire is not a central emotional issue. There aren’t many, but there are a few, including Elizabeth Lynn’s Chronicles of Tornor, and, of course, most of Melissa Scott’s books, both those written alone and those written with her partner Lisa Barnett. Ellen Kushner has explored the ways society (and the lovers themselves) can make lovers of any gender suffer in her Riverside series: Swordspoint, The Privilege of the Sword, and The Fall of the Kings. And finally, I want to mention the little-known Elemental Logic novels of Laurie J. Marks: Fire Logic, Earth Logic, and Water Logic, which take place in a society where the family units consist of multiple husbands and wives and their children. There are conflicts aplenty–mostly having to do with the military culture that has been occupying them for decades. Beautiful world-building, fascinating, thorny, very human characters.
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Nick Mamatas has posted the table of contents for the upcoming anthology Shades of Blue and Gray edited by Steve Berman:

Here’s the book description:

More Americans were killed during the years 1861-1865 than any other date in history. Men shattered, women lost, families broken. In Shades of Blue and Gray, editor Steve Berman offers readers tales of the supernatural – ghost stories that range from the haunts of the battlefield to revenants on the long march home. Yank. Rebel. Both finding themselves at odds in flesh and spirit.

Here’s the table of contents…
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Nick Mamatas has posted the table of contents for the upcoming anthology Where thy Dark Eye Glances: Queering Edgar Allan Poe edited by Steve Berman:

Here’s the book description:

The canon of Edgar Allan Poe, one of the foremost writers of dark and atmospheric fiction and poetry, offers readers haunted shores teeming with various erudite men brooding in the waning light over their feelings for unobtainable women. Yet, whether the tales or verses are grotesque or sinister, Poe’s narrators are Outsiders, dealing with emotions that so many queer individuals feel: isolation and abandonment as well as loneliness and lost love. In Where Thy Dark Eye Glances, editor Steve Berman has assembled a range of tales that queer the prose and poetry of the Poe, the man himself, as well as dark and eerie stories about reading Poe’s work. Featuring such notable authors as Richard Bowes, Terra LeMay, Nick Mamatas, John Mantooth, and Tansy Roberts.

Here’s the table of contents…
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Prime Books has posted the table of contents, cover art and synopsis of the upcoming zombie anthology TITLE edited by Steve Berman.

Here’s the synopsis:

It’s a wonder humanity ever survived into the twenty-first century. Even Neanderthals knew to bury the dead beneath stones to prevent corpses from rising. Ancient civilizations feared slain warriors would return from battlefields, medieval physicians worried that bodies would rise from plague pits, many cultures buried the dead at crossroads to prevent the dead from walking. In Zombies: Shambling Through the Ages, editor Steve Berman has collected stories that reveal the threat of revenants and the living dead is far from recent. From the Bronze Age to World War II, this anthology guides us through millennia of thrills, chills, kills, carnage, horror, and havoc wreaked throughout history by the walking dead.

And here’s the table of contents:
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This panel at The Center for Fiction explored “outsiderness” in the world of science fiction and fantasy. Panelists included Steve Berman, Carlos Hernandez, Andrea Hairston, Alaya Dawn Johnson and Samuel R. Delany and was moderatedby Ellen Kushner.

Now, through the magic of YouTube, you can enjoy all 3 parts right here:

[via Jennifer Marie Brissett, who is alos in today's Mind Meld. It's Jennifer Marie Brissett day!]