In episode 233 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester chats with Rebecca Roland Author of Shards of History, and The King of Ash and Bones, and Other Stories.

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In episode 231 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester chats with Scott Lynch Author of The Lies of Locke Lamora, Red Seas Under Red Skies, and Republic of Thieves.

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In episode 229 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester chats with ML Brennan Author of Generation V and Iron Night.

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The SF Signal Podcast (Episode 223): Live From Worldcon with Michael J. Martinez

In episode 223 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester chats with Michael J. Martinez author of The Daedalus Incident.

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In episode 216 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester is live from WorldCon with author Django Wexler.

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The SF Signal Podcast (Episode 214): Live from WorldCon with Author Nancy Hightower

In episode 214 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester is live from WorldCon with author Nancy Hightower.

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In episode 212 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester records a live interview from WorldCon with author Trina Marie Phillips.

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In episode 207 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester sits down in the food court at Worldcon to chat with David Boop.

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In episode 205 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester sits down to chat with Betsy Dornbusch – Author of the Seven Eyes fantasy series, and Sentinel urban fantasy series, as well as an Editor at Electric Spec Magazine.

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In episode 204 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester sneaks into an unused programming room to chat with the editor, publisher, and several contributing authors of the Beyond the Sun anthology, out from Fairwood Press.
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In episode 202 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester welcomes Lynne M. Thomas (2013 Hugo Award winner – Best Fancast), Michael Damian Thomas (2013 Hugo Award Nominee – Semi-Prozine – APEX Magazine, and John Kilma (Hugo Award Winner – Electric Velocipede 2009) to discuss the genesis and journey of the Glitter & Mayhem (APEX Books) anthology from conception to publication launch party at Worldcon in San Antonio, Texas.

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About Jason: Jason M. Hough (pronounced ‘Huff’) is a former 3D Artist and Game Designer (Metal Fatigue, Aliens vs. Predator: Extinction, and many others). Writing fiction became a hobby for him in 2007 and quickly turned into an obsession. He started writing THE DARWIN ELEVATOR in 2008 as a Nanowrimo project, and kept refining the manuscript until 2011 when it sold to Del Rey along with a contract for two sequels. The book released on July 30th in the US and reached the New York Times Bestseller list the following week.

The trilogy, collectively called THE DIRE EARTH CYCLE, will be released in the summer of 2013.
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The SF Signal Podcast (Episode 200!): 2013 WorldCon Wrap-Up

In episode 200 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester, Gail Carriger, Matthew Sanborn Smith, Karen Burnham and John DeNardo chat about their adventures at this year’s WorldCon in San Antonio, Texas.
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James Gunn is a Grand Master of Science Fiction, one of its best historians and proponents, and is a gentleman and a scholar. He’s been writing science fiction for 64 years, and has been a science fiction scholar for 54 years. I only spoke with him a couple of times briefly at Worldcon, but he was gracious and very forthcoming. At 90 years of age, Jim was energetic, articulate, polite and had time for everyone. And his memory and clarity of mind rivals the sharpest.

Jim started reading pulps like Doc Savage magazine (who doesn’t like Doc?), and a set of Tarzan novels found in the back of his parents’ closet. He absorbed all the magazines he could at Andy’s used magazine store. He has memories of his Uncle John taking him (at 14 years old) and his brother to see H.G. Wells speak; Jim doesn’t recall what Wells talked about, but recalls that he was “short and dumpy, and spoke in a high voice.” He and his brother tried to get close enough to touch and talk to his hero, but were unable to.

His first science fiction story was called “Paradox” – it was rejected by Astounding (John Campbell) and Amazing but eventually sold to Thrilling Wonder Stories for $80. The late Frederik Pohl was Gunn’s agent; they first met in person at the 10th Worldcon in Chicago in 1952. Gunn sold nine of his first ten stories, but he took two years. With his wartime savings running out, he turned to Kansas University.

As a science fiction scholar, Professor Gunn founded the Center for the Study of Science Fiction as Kansas University. His scholarly works include the series of six Road to Science Fiction anthologies and Isaac Asimov: The Foundations of Science Fiction (for which he won the Hugo for Best Non-Fiction Book in 1983). He also wrote a book of science fiction criticism, Alternate Worlds: The Illustrated History Of Science Fiction, which won a special award from the 1976 World SF Convention (there were no Hugos for non-fiction at that time). He is the only person to be president of both the Science Fiction Writers Association (1971-1972) and the Science Fiction Research Association.

James Gunn was recognized with the Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award for lifetime achievement in 2007.

His latest novel, Transcendental, is as ambitious and optimistic as his novels from decades ago. In this interview (partially in person, mostly via email), Professor Gunn discusses his past, science fiction’s past, his new novel, and how Science Fiction can save the world.

(There is a link below to also skip over the parts about Transcendental, for those who wish to read the interview but want to avoid any spoilers.)

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Christopher J. Garcia is a writer, historian, fanzine editor (editor of The Drink Tank and co-editor (with James Bacon) of Journey Planet), and filmmaker from Santa Clara, California. He’s lost 16 Hugos in three categories, but managed to win Best Fanzine in 2011. He’s a Curator at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA. He is also working on a fannish documentary series called 5 Cons.

Conversations at the Bottom of the Escalator
An Open Letter to John DeNardo

Dear John,

First off, congrats! You’ve got your second Hugo which can now be used as bookends! That’s the best thing about getting your second, so I’ve been told, and as long as one of the books between them is All Our Yesterdays by Harry Warner, I’ll never complain about comin’ in second to ya on both of ‘em!
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2013 LoneStarCon3/WorldCon Trip Report

I’m still flying high after LonestarCon3/Worldcon 2013. What a blast it was. Even though I arrived relatively late to the con, the people there instantly made me feel right at home.

Convention panels are fun, but for me the real pleasure in attending conventions is hanging out with like-minded book-lovers. Many people made this con a memorable lifetime experience for me — too many to name-drop without leaving someone out, but they know who they are — and they were not only the fellow attendees with whom I shared laughs with, but also the convention runners who put on a great con. Well done! My only regret is that I didn’t have more time to spend with fellow con-goers, and some fiends I missed seeing completely. Next time!

This convention had the largest-ever attendance by regular SF Signal contributors. I finally got to meet some of them for the first time in person. It was like a family gathering, only without the arguments and guilt. (Even so: I’m the crotchety old uncle.) :)

Speaking of gatherings, the SF Signal Meetup was a smashing success. Lots of fans and authors showed up for a relaxed get-together and some fun schmoozing. It ran long, but only because it was so much fun. Thanks to everyone who attended!
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LoneStarCon 3, the 71st World Science Fiction Convention (“Worldcon”) will be featuring the world premiere of the documentary Lakeside about author Jay Lake’s battle with cancer, as well as a special exhibit based on Jay Lake’s genome.

More info in the following press release…
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LoneStarCon 3 Announces Memorial Day Weekend Membership Sale

Do you have tickets to this year’s LonestarCon/WorldCon? If not, they are offering a special membership rate discount for all Adult Attending membership purchases made over the Memorial Day weekend.

Press release follows…

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In episode 169 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester chats with Christopher J. Garcia, winner of the 2011 Hugo Award for Best Fanzine (along with James Bacon) for The Drink Tank.
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In episode 165 of the SF Signal Podcast, Patrick Hester chats at WorldCon with Douglas Hulick, author of Among Thieves.

About Douglas Hulick: Douglas Hulick was born in Fargo, ND, but spent much of his life moving about the Midwest. Somehow, he kept ending up in the vicinity of Chicago, IL, which helps explain his abiding love of deep-dish pizza, Ferris Bueller, and Goose Island beer. Somewhere along the way, a copy of A Dictionary of the Underworld by Eric Partridge fell into Douglas’s hands. Having sold a few fantasy short stories, Douglas thought a book that defined historical thieves cant (criminal jargon) and described some of the practices of that world might come in handy at some point. Little did he know. Among Thieves, his first novel, grew out of this unlikely seed over the course of a decade. It was acquired by Roc/Penguin U.S.A. on Douglas’s 44th birthday in 2009. Douglas lives with his wife and two sons in Minnesota. When not writing or chasing after his kids, he likes to practice and teach 17th century Italian rapier combat (in the tradition of Ridolfo Capoferro), cook, read, and hang out in coffee shops.

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