PS Publishing has posted the table of contents for the new anniversary printing of the horror anthology Best New Horror #2.

Here’s the book description:

This revised and updated second edition of Best New Horror showcases some of the very best short stories and novellas published in 1990, the year when the horror boom finally went bust. In this vilifying volume you will rediscover terrifying tales by, amongst many others, Poppy Z. Brite, Jonathan Carroll, Harlan Ellison, Elizabeth Hand, Michael Marshall Smith, Peter Straub, F. Paul Wilson, Gahan Wilson and Gene Wolfe, along with an overview of the year in horror by the editors and a nightmare necrology of those who kicked off this mortal coil during that period.

So get ready to spread your wings and take a bite out of this latest anthology of agony. And don’t forget to tell your fellow fiends about our new series of Best New Horror reprints. Just let them know who sent you…

Here’s the table of contents…
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Short Film: Brent Sims’ Grave Shivers

Brent Sims’ Grave Shivers is a short sci-fi/horror anthology that weaves three tales of monsters, killers, and things that go bump in the night. It was a recent award winner at the H.P. Lovecraft Film Festival in Los Angeles and the New Orleans Film Festival.

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Check out the cool-looking Mike Corley cover for Jake Kerr’s new novel Tommy Black and the Staff of Light, available next week…
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SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-10-30

Interviews & Profiles

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Jody Wallace grew up in the present day United States in a very rural area. Okay, not present day, but, you know, in the past couple of decades. She went to school a long time and ended up with a Master’s Degree in Creative Writing and loafing. Her meatloafs, in particular, are stellar. Her resume includes English instructor, technical documents editor, market analyst, and general, all around pain in the butt. Ms. Wallace’s approach to writing is to tell as many outlandish lies as she can get her readers to swallow. That trait is really on display in her SFR (Science Fiction Romance) spoof, The Adventures of Mari Shu.

About the series:

Mari Shu, a factory drudge in the year 4000-something, must choose how to protect her sisters, her purity, and her own conscience in a bleak futuristic society that’s been polluted by smog, rampant commercialism, tacky jumpsuits, sexual perversions, unjust socioeconomics, interstellar travel, and inconsistent use of the Oxford comma.

Parodies peel back the layers of a genre in interesting, and often hilarious ways. In the case of Jody Wallace’s The Adventures of Mari Shu, the laser-sharp focus is science fiction and sci-fi romance. This new series is an epic parody in the vein of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Only with more sexxoring and goo. The first two volumes, Earthbound Passion and Martian Conquest, have been unleashed throughout the galaxy.

So we could learn more about Jody Wallace’s new series, I met with her at the Olde Earth Parks and Rec Commission. While standing in a mile-long line to look at some grass, we chatted about widgets, *** seals, and criminal hovercycle gangs.
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I was perusing Sci-Fi Chronicles: A Visual History of the Galaxy’s Greatest Science Fiction edited by Guy Haley, and found out that I am perhaps even less of a sci-fi trivia king than I thought.

Head on over to Kirkus Reviews to see the 10 things that I learned about Sci-Fi from reading Sci-Fi Chronicles

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Tom Calen Tom Calen is the author of the bestselling horror series, The Pandemic Sequence (comprised of The Tilian Virus, The Tilian Effect and The Tilian Cure), as well as the science-fiction series, Scars of Tomorrow (comprised of Torrance and The Ignota). A New York City native, Tom holds a degree in English and spent several years toiling in the world of business before abandoning all reason and deciding to write full-time. He finds the worlds in his novels far less frightening than the corporate world. His books The Tilian Virus and The Tilian Effect both reached #1 on Amazon’s Bestselling Science-Fiction Series list, and both were the #1 Hot New Release in horror and science-fiction.From Castle Rock to Arakis, Middle Earth to Westeros, Tom eagerly devours as many science-fiction, fantasy, and horror novels as time allows. He credits George R.R. Martin, Robert Jordan, and Stephen King as the major influences on his style. Tom is an Active member of the Horror Writers Association, and International Thriller Writers, Inc. He is currently living in Nicaragua, where he is working on his seventh book.

Goodbye to Our Star Trek Future

by Tom Calen

Robotic limbs? Check. Cloned mammals? Check. Tablet devices? Check. Holographic touchscreens? Genetic engineering? Check. Nearly every gadget and doohickey in Star Trek? Check, check, check.

There’s no denying that real-life technology has made drastic surges forward over the last fifty years. Tech that was once only available in episodes of The Jetsons and Star Trek are now found in homes around the world. We carry it in our pockets (iPhones), on our wrists (smart watches), and on our faces (Google Glass). We use it to shop (credit cards, and now Apple Pay) and to go to war (stealth bombers and unmanned aerial drones). These technological advances have undoubtedly made our lives more convenient. But, as a writer who has recently dabbled in penning science fiction, I politely ask: Please STOP! You’re making my job more difficult.
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Hey, zombie fans!

The eBook version of the massive John Joseph Adams anthology The Living Dead is on sale for only $1.99 on the Kindle and Nook platforms!

Here’s the description:

“When there’s no more room in hell, the dead will walk the earth!”

From White Zombie to Dawn of the Dead, Resident Evil to World War Z, zombies have invaded popular culture, becoming the monsters that best express the fears and anxieties of the modern west. Gathering together the best zombie literature of the last three decades from many of today’s most renowned authors of fantasy, speculative fiction, and horror, including Stephen King, Harlan Ellison, Robert Silverberg, George R. R. Martin, Clive Barker, Poppy Z. Brite, Neil Gaiman, Joe Hill, Laurell K. Hamilton, and Joe R. Lansdale, The Living Dead covers the broad spectrum of zombie fiction.

The $1.99 price is available for a limited time, so act fast if you want it.

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[Do you have an idea for a future Mind Meld? Let us know!]

This is a double-edged question about a writer/book who/that evoked that emotion of fear in you. Not a horror writer/novel (for example not Stephen King), but perhaps an Epic Fantasy, Science Fiction, or Urban Fantasy novel where you found parts of it scary/creepy. To the point you might think to yourself, “I’d love to see a straight-out horror novel from this writer!” (Which some participants answered)

Q: Which novel/writer/movie, that wasn’t specifically a horror novel/writer/movie, spooked you the most?

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…And the adaptation news keeps coming!

Deadline is reporting that Horrorstör, the unique supernatural mystery novel written by Grady Hendrix, is being adapted for television!

Horrorstör is a haunted house story of a different color. It’s about the strange goings-on at the Ikea-like Orsk furniture superstore in Cleveland, Ohio…where employees arrive every morning to find the store trashed. The store cameras reveal nothing, so a small group of brave employees agree to work the night shift, when they encounter unspeakable horrors. Horrorstör is unique in that comes packaged in the form of a glossy mail order catalog, complete with product illustrations, a home delivery order form, and a map of Orsk’s labyrinthine showroom.

The rights to Horrorstör have been acquired for development as a television series by The Jackal Group, a co-venture between Fox Networks Group and Gail Berman. Berman spearheaded the development of the successful Buffy The Vampire Slayer television series, another series that mixed horror and humor, as Horrorstör was obviously designed to do. That bodes well for any show that might develop from this.

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Cooking the Books with Fran Wilde and Rajan Khanna

Author Rajan Khanna joined Fran Wilde on Cooking the Books podcast to celebrate his debut from Pyr, Falling Sky.

You can read the first chapter of Falling Sky at Tor.com. Rajan will be reading at the World Fantasy Convention on Thursday, November 6 from 2:30-3pm, and at the December KGB Fantastic Fiction Reading in Manhattan, with Author Steven Gould.

The ingredients for Cooking the Books podcast #005 – “It’s Hard to Fish from an Airship: Cooking the Books with Rajan Khanna” include:
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SF/F Crowd Funding Roundup For 10/27/2014

Crowd funding is the in thing for obtaining money to fund a variety of projects, with Kickstarter being the most prominent of these sites. With new projects going live daily, it’s a chore to keep up with, let alone find, interesting genre projects. The Crowd Funding Roundup will be our effort to bring projects we think are interesting to your attention so you can, if you so choose, decide to help out. These posts are a collaborative effort between James Aquilone and JP Frantz.

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Here’s the table of contents for the upcoming issue of Shimmer.

Shimmer blends the perfect speculative cocktail for its twenty-first issue. Three parts exuberance to one part seawater, a sand-crusted spun-sugar glass brushed with winter’s fresh boughs.

These four stories, from Shimmer alums and novices alike, will take you on a journey that is familiar as earth, but as strange as stars. We explore the depths of the sea and the dry deserts both, where encounters don’t have to be alien to terrify.

Here’s the table of contents…

Fiction

  • “A Whisper in the Weld” Alix E. Harrow
  • “Caretaker” by Carlie St. George
  • “Cantor’s Dragon” by Craig DeLancey
  • “The One They Took Before” by Kelly Sandoval

Features

  • Editorial by E. Catherine Tobler
  • Author Interviews by Joy Marchand

Artwork

  • “A Whisper in the Weld” by Sandro Castelli

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In case you’re looking for free stuff — And who isn’t? — have I go some news for you! Well, maybe not as much as your ears, but let’s face it, you’ve been neglecting your ears for years!

Anywho, SciFi Songster John Anealio has a 4-song Halloween E.P. that’s available for download. You can download for free…or you can listen for free first below and then do make John a happy SciFi Songster by naming your price and buying it.

Listen after the jump!

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Courtesy of the Tor Books, SF Signal has a set of 2 books to give away to one lucky reader: The Time Roads by Beth Bernobich and Heart Of Stone by Debra Mullins!

Here’s more about the books:
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Free SF, Fantasy and Horror Fiction for 10/29/2014

Got a hot Free Fiction Tip? Tell me here

Want these delicious links emailed to you once a week? Sign up for the Free SF/F/H Fiction Newsletter
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SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-10-29

Interviews & Profiles

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Erik Williams is a former Naval Officer and current defense contractor (but he’s not allowed to talk about it). He is also the author of the novel Demon and numerous other small press works and short stories. He currently lives in San Diego with his wife and three very young daughters. When he’s not at his day job, he can usually be found changing diapers or coveting carbohydrates. At some point in his life, he was told by a few people he had potential. Recently, he told himself he’s the bee’s knees. Erik prefers to refer to himself in the third person but feels he’s talked about himself enough and will grant your eyeballs the freedom they deserve. Visit Erik at his website or follow him on Twitter as @TheErikWilliams.

Five Essential Horror Novels You Didn’t Know were Horror Novels

by Erik Williams

Sure, you’ve all heard of “essential” horror novels everyone should read. That’s easy. So instead of making an easy list, I’m going to hit you with five books that not only do you need to read but read with the understanding, regardless of whatever genre they claim to be in, they truly are horror novels at their core.
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Texas born and raised, Martha Wells is the author of over a dozen science fiction and fantasy novels, including the Nebula-nominated The Death of the Necromancer, as well as a number of short stories and nonfiction articles. Her books have been published in seven languages. Her most recent work has been in the Three Worlds universe, stories of an extended family of a shapeshifting race called the Raksura. The story of Moon, orphaned and found by members of his race starts in The Cloud Roads, continues through its sequels The Serpent Sea and The Siren Depths.

Her latest book, Stories of the Raksura Volume I: The Falling World and the Tale of Indigo and Cloud, presents us with several new stories set in the universe.

Martha was kind enough to answer some questions about the Raksura and her work.


PAUL: The Three Worlds universe is strikingly different than the fantastical European settings of the Ile-Rien novels. What were your inspirations in creating it?

MARTHA WELLS: I wanted to do something that was very different from my other books. I wanted a world where, as the characters traveled through it, the reader would have no idea what was over the next hill. I wanted scope to do things I hadn’t ever done before with magical cities, characters, and environments.
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NOTE: This installment of Special Needs In Strange Worlds features a guest post from author Corinne Duyvis! – Sarah Chorn


A lifelong Amsterdammer, Corinne Duyvis spends her days writing speculative young adult and middle grade novels. She enjoys brutal martial arts and gets her geek on whenever possible. Otherbound, her YA fantasy debut, released from Amulet Books/ABRAMS in the summer of 2014. It’s received four starred reviews—Kirkus called it “original and compelling; a stunning debut,” while the Bulletin praised its “subtle, nuanced examinations of power dynamics and privilege.” She is a co-founder of Disability in Kidlit and team member of We Need Diverse Books. Find Corinne at her Twitter or Tumblr.

Mind Your Metaphors

by Corinne Duyvis
(content warnings: ableism, “mercy killing”)

I’m a co-founder of the website Disability in Kidlit as well as an author who regularly writes disabled characters; both my recently published fantasy novel Otherbound and my upcoming sci-fi novel On the Edge of Gone feature disabled protagonists. On top of that, I’m disabled myself. It’s pretty safe to say I’m a huge fan of disability representation. Specifically, I’m a fan of accurate, respectful, and textual disability representation.

However, when writing science fiction and fantasy, it doesn’t just stop at featuring textually disabled characters. Many SFF stories contain disability metaphors. These span a wide range—from purposeful to unintentional, from obvious to subtle, and from well-done to inadvertently offensive.
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