SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-11-17

Interviews & Profiles

Read the rest of this entry

Filed under: Tidbits

Michaele Jordan informed me of this entertaining 2005 short film, The Mysterious Explorations of Jasper Morello. Set in a world of iron dirigibles and steam powered computers, this gothic horror mystery tells the story of Jasper Morello, a disgraced aerial navigator who flees his plague-ridden home on a desperate voyage to redeem himself.

Read the rest of this entry

Tagged with:

Filed under: Movies

Here are a few book that I’m looking forward to reading…

Read the rest of this entry

Tagged with:

Filed under: ArtBooks

Free SF, Fantasy and Horror Fiction for 11/15/2014

Got a hot Free Fiction Tip? Tell me here

Want these delicious links emailed to you once a week? Sign up for the Free SF/F/H Fiction Newsletter

Read the rest of this entry

Tagged with:

Filed under: Free Fiction

SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-11-15

Interviews & Profiles

Read the rest of this entry

Filed under: Books

Here’s a trio of tasy Tor books coming out next year…

Read the rest of this entry

Tagged with:

Filed under: ArtBooks

BOOK REVIEW: Younger Gods by Michael R. Underwood

REVIEW SUMMARY: A strong urban fantasy novel that shows the author’s diverse tastes and skills in the subgenre.

MY RATING:

BRIEF SYNOPSIS:: Former cultist Jacob Hicks’ relatively innocuous life in New York City gets a kick in the rear as his sister comes to town to start the Apocalypse.

MY REVIEW:
PROS:: A pair of strong characters as family protagonist and antagonist; excellent overall use of New York City as a setting.
CONS: Almost too much worldbuilding and things thrown into the Urban Fantasy blender; one tiny mistake regarding a locale in Staten Island.
BOTTOM LINE: A strong story that introduces a delightfully tasty and complicated urban fantasy world that consistently keeps the reader turning pages.

It’s a classic story as old as time. Farm boy from North Dakota goes to the big city (in this case New York City), gets into big trouble because he is a hick from the sticks. In Michael R. Underwood’s urban fantasy novel The Younger Gods, he even has the adopted last name to prove it. Jacob Hicks née Greene has bigger problems than just managing his classes and his job, and even dealing with the confusing maelstrom of culture that is New York. Jacob’s big sister is coming to town, and she is not happy with her baby brother at all. How does the farm boy, already somewhat adrift in an alien and confusing world, handle family coming to town on top of it?

Read the rest of this entry

Tagged with:

Filed under: Book Review

Stolen, the newest installment (after Frozen) of the Heart of Dread series by Melissa de la Cruz and Michael Johnston just came out, and the married couple stopped by to chat about the new book, and much more! You can find out more about Melissa and the series at her website.


Kristin Centorcelli: Congrats on the new book in the Heart of Dread series, Stolen! Will you give us the scoop on what we can expect from Nat and Wes in this installment?

Melissa and Mike: Stolen picks up a few months where Frozen left off, Nat is learning to use her power and Wes is reduced to driving in the death races in Vegas. Wes gets a tip about his missing sister and races to her, only to find himself in the same place as Nat. They uncover more terrible secrets of in both the fantastic world of Vallonis and the gritty world of the RSA.
Read the rest of this entry

Tagged with:

Filed under: Interviews

One of the current viral videos floating about is Gotham Begins, a parody of the new pre-Batman series Gotham. That alone is worth a post — it’s funny and points out one of the flaws of the show — but it also gives me a reason to talk a little about the show.

First things first. Here’s the trailer:

Read the rest of this entry

Tagged with:

Filed under: HumorTV

Here is the table of contents for the new issue of Flash Fiction Online:

  • “Monoceros Ptolemy Cluster” by Steven W. Johnson
  • “Black Friday” by Brynn MacNab
  • “The Rules of the Game” by Alexandra Grunberg

This issue, which went live November 1st, was edited by Suzanne Vincent and features a cover image by Dario Bijelac and cover design by Anna Yeatts.

Single ebooks and subscriptions are available via Weightless Books.

Support Flash Fiction Online via Patreon.

Tagged with:

Filed under: BooksWeb Sites

Honest Trailer: Maleficent

Another honest trailer…this time for the Angelina Jolie flick, Maleficent

Read the rest of this entry

Tagged with:

Filed under: HumorMovies

There is still some time left for you to enter our giveaway for The Cosmic Cocktail by Katherine Freese…but hurry, time is running out!

See the original post for details on how to enter.

Filed under: Contest

Friday YouTube: The Flying Nun

Decades before Sally Field was Peter Parker’s Aunt May, she was fascinated speculative fiction fans (I guess) on The Flying Nun.

She played a nun. That flies.

Oh, just watch.

Read the rest of this entry

Tagged with:

Filed under: TV

SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-11-14

Interviews & Profiles

Read the rest of this entry

Filed under: Tidbits

REVIEW SUMMARY: A multifacted set of essays that has proven unexpectedly topical.

MY RATING:

BRIEF SYNOPSIS:: The Mad Norwegian Chicks dig… series continues with three dozen essays by women on gaming from video games to Dungeons and Dragons.

MY REVIEW:
PROS: High profile contributors on a variety of types and aspects of games; strong personal stories; many “I didn’t know that!” moments to be had reading essays.
CONS: Some of the essays feel like filler.
BOTTOM LINE: A set of essays made more timely by recent events than when the anthology was first conceived and essays written.

Stereotypes of women and their relation (or lack of relation) to games, particularly videogames and roleplaying games, have abounded since the dawn of both. From the old anti-D&D movie Mazes and Monsters to Felicia Day’s The Guild and The Gamers: Dorkness Rising, depictions of games and videogames as a male-only activity rarely touched by women have been stereotyped, parodied and deconstructed. And on the face of it, the idea that half of the human population neither plays “real” videogames (whatever that means) or roleplaying games is ludicrous. And yet this misperception persists.

Even the idea that the gaming industry is exclusively male and therefore targeted to males is completely at sea with reality. Fantasy authors like Carrie Patel and Erin Hoffman write fantasy novels and work in the videogaming industry. Authors and publishers like Shanna Germain write and publish high-profile roleplaying games.

For answers — and real essays and thoughts by women on their relationship to games — one can come to Chicks Dig Gaming, the latest in the Chicks Dig… series put out by small press publisher Mad Norwegian Press. This latest volume is edited by Jennifer Brozek, Robert Smith and Lars Pearson. Brozek, like the aforementioned Shanna Germain, works both in roleplaying games and as an author and anthologist herself.

Read the rest of this entry

Tagged with:

Filed under: Book Review

In this series, I ask various publishing professionals (including authors, bloggers, editors, agents etc.) to recommend 2-3 authors or books they feel haven’t received the recognition they deserve.

Today’s recommendations are by Christopher Buehlman. Christopher Buehlman is the author of the literary horror novels Those Across the River, Between Two Fires, The Necromancer’s House, and The Lesser Dead. The winner of the 2007 Bridport Prize in poetry, he is also the author of several provocative plays, including Hot Nights for the War Wives of Ithaka. His first novel, Those Across the River, was nominated for a World Fantasy Award for best novel in 2012. Christopher lives in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Read the rest of this entry

Tagged with:

Filed under: Recommended Reading by Professionals

This week on the Kirkus Reviews Blog, I dive into Star Wars comics. From the post:

Since Star Wars is on everyone’s mind, including mine, I thought I’d take a moment here on the Kirkus Blog to look at Star Wars comics, and specifically, some of my favorites. There’s a vast span of time after Return of the Jedi in 1983, and the publication of Timothy Zahn’s Heir to the Empire in 1991. A lot of people like to call this ‘the wasteland’ as far as Star Wars is concerned. During that time period, you basically had some (good, some bad) arcade games, a pair of family-friendly Ewok Movies (Caravan of Courage and The Battle for Endor), and the Marvel line of comics, which ended in 1986, to sate your Star Wars cravings.

To read the rest of the article, click over to the Kirkus Reviews Blog.

Tagged with:

Filed under: BooksComic Books


Michaele Jordan is the author of the period occult thriller Mirror Maze and her stories have appeared in Redstone Science Fiction, Buzzy Mag, The Crimson Pact, Volumes 4 and 5 and Fantasy and Science Fiction. You can visit her website at MichaeleJordan.com while waiting for the upcoming steampunk adventure Jocasta and the Indians.

Animé Can Be Art

by Michaele Jordan

I’ve talked about French animation before. But I left out one very important name. This wasn’t an accident or an oversight. I felt that Michel Ocelot had to have his own column, if only for his revolutionary work in cut-out and silhouette animation.
Read the rest of this entry

Tagged with:

Filed under: Anime

In episode 268 of the SF Signal Podcast Patrick Hester is LIVE from MileHiCon 46 in the Denver Tech Center in part 2 of our Doctor Who panel with Jason Batt, Karen Bjorn, Eytan Kollin and Ian Brazee Cannon.

Read the rest of this entry

Tagged with:

Filed under: Podcast

Science fiction and fantasy authors James Morrow, Patricia C. Wrede, Ian R. MacLeod, Paul Di Filippo, and Simon R. Green share the fun, challenging, and sometimes frustrating experience of writing their first novels.

Read the rest of this entry

Tagged with:

Filed under: Books

 Page 3 of 940 « 1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »