WINNERS: 2014 Hugo Awards

The winners of the 2014 Hugo Award have been announced.

[Woot! Hooray for Patrick Hester and the SF Signal Podcast!]

  • BEST NOVEL: Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie (Orbit US / Orbit UK)
  • BEST NOVELLA: “Equoid” by Charles Stross (Tor.com, 09-2013)
  • BEST NOVELETTE: “The Lady Astronaut of Mars” by Mary Robinette Kowal (maryrobinettekowal.com/Tor.com, 09-2013)
  • BEST SHORT STORY: “The Water That Falls on You from Nowhere” by John Chu (Tor.com, 02-2013)BEST RELATED WORK: “We Have Always Fought: Challenging the Women, Cattle and Slaves Narrative” by Kameron Hurley (A Dribble of Ink)
  • BEST GRAPHIC STORY: “Time” by Randall Munroe (XKCD)
  • BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION (LONG FORM): Gravity written by Alfonso Cuarón & Jonás Cuarón, directed by Alfonso Cuarón (Esperanto Filmoj; Heyday Films; Warner Bros.)
  • BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION (SHORT FORM): Game of Thrones: “The Rains of Castamere” written by David Benioff & D.B. Weiss, directed by David Nutter (HBO Entertainment in association with Bighead, Littlehead; Television 360; Startling Television and Generator Productions)
  • BEST EDITOR – SHORT FORM: Ellen Datlow
  • BEST EDITOR – LONG FORM: Ginjer Buchanan
  • BEST PROFESSIONAL ARTIST: Julie Dillon
  • BEST SEMIPROZINE: Lightspeed Magazine edited by John Joseph Adams, Rich Horton, and Stefan Rudnicki
  • BEST FANZINE: A Dribble of Ink edited by Aidan Moher
  • BEST FANCAST: SF Signal Podcast – Patrick Hester
  • BEST FAN WRITER: Kameron Hurley
  • BEST FAN ARTIST: Sarah Webb
  • JOHN W. CAMPBELL AWARD FOR BEST NEW WRITER (Not a Hugo): Sofia Samatar

Congratulations to all the winners!

Here are the voting stats.

See also: Past winners

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WINNERS: 2013 Sidewise Award

The winners of this year’s Sidewise Awards for Alternate History have been announced:
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WINNERS: 2014 Chesley Awards

The winners for the 2014 Chesley Awards have been announced!

  • BEST COVER ILLUSTRATION: HARDBACK BOOK: Todd Lockwood for A Natural History of Dragons by Marie Brennan; Tor, Feb. 2013
  • BEST COVER ILLUSTRATION: PAPERBACK BOOK: Kerem Beyit for The Scroll of Years by Chris Willrich; Pyr, Sept. 2013
  • BEST COVER ILLUSTRATION: MAGAZINE: Dan Dos Santos for Fables #136; Vertigo, Dec. 2013
  • BEST INTERIOR ILLUSTRATION: Brian Kesinger for Walking Your Octopus, July 2013; Baby Tattoo Books
  • BEST THREE-DIMENSIONAL ART: Devon Dorrity for Cecaelia, Queen of the Ocean, clay
  • BEST UNPUBLISHED: COLOR WORK: Donato Giancola for Huor and Hurin Approaching Gondolin, oil on linen
  • BEST UNPUBLISHED: MONOCHROME WORK: Ruth Sanderson for The Descent or Persephone, scratchboard
  • BEST PRODUCT ILLUSTRATION: Julie Bell & Boris Vallejo for Jeannie’s Kitten, IlluXCon 6 promotional art
  • BEST GAMING-RELATED ILLUSTRATION: Lucas Graciano for The Last Stand of Thorin Oakenshield for The Battle of Five Armies Board Game, Ares Games
  • BEST ART DIRECTOR: Irene Gallo, Tor & Tor.com
  • LIFETIME ARTISTIC ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: Jim Burns

Congrats to all the winners!

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Boooks excite me. Here are a few examples of books that I’m looking forward to reading.

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SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-08-16

Interviews & Profiles

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WINNER: ECHOPRAXIA by Peter Watts

The winner of our giveaway for Echopraxia by Peter Watts has been chosen and notified.

Congratulations to: Shaz T.! You will be receiving your prize soon!

Thanks to everyone who entered.

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The winner of our giveaway for The Ultra Thin Man by Patrick Swenson has been chosen and notified.

Congratulations to: Brandon M.! You will be receiving your prize soon!

Thanks to everyone who entered.

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GAME REVIEW: Fez

Fez is a platform jumper with an interdimensional twist, released by Polytron in 2012. In Fez, you are a marshmallow-looking fellow happily living in his little town of similar marshmallow-looking people until you meet a divine being known as the Hypercube which gives you a magical hat (the titular fez) which gives you the ability to venture into… dun dun DUN… the third dimension. Or, well, kind of the third dimension–more accurately a two-dimensional orthogonal projection of a rotatable view of the third dimension. Yes, yes, I know that’s confusing unless you happen to have a computer graphics background. It takes a little work to wrap your head around it, but once you understand it is a neat idea that lends the game most of its novelty.

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MY RATING:

BRIEF SYNOPSIS:: On the frontier of an Empire squabbling with the indigenous elf-like inhabitants and its global rival, a fateful trip shepherding a governor and his family upriver throws two mercenaries into intrigue and danger.

MY REVIEW:
PROS: Strong pair of central characters; excellent and original worldbuilding; gritty, sharp and potent action and dialogue; a beautiful book cover.
CONS: A few more thousand words to flesh some of the worldbuilding would help clarify some matters.
BOTTOM LINE: An absorbing turn into secondary world fantasy that deserves a wide audience.

The Incorruptibles is a turn into secondary world fantasy for John Hornor Jacobs, best known for his horror and dark fantasy. In it, Dveng “Shoe” Ilys and Fisk are a pair of long-time partners in the mercenary business in the territories. Their current job (along with their young recruit, Banty) is to shepherd a bunch of rich Rumans — a Governor’s family, no less — as they steam upriver on their riverboat. It is Banty’s impulsiveness, however, that will bring these mercenaries into close contact with Gnaeus’ family, and it is the mercenaries that will stand between the family and the very dangerous frontier. Not even the feral elf-like vaettir is the most dangerous thing in the Territories, not when a potential failure of the real reason for Govenor’s Gnaeus’ trip upriver could mean a world war.

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Born in Ottawa and raised on Canada’s west coast, Robin Riopelle’s life has been marked by adoption, separation, and reunion. Like many of her characters, she has a muddy past and a foot in (at least) two different worlds. She’s always had interesting work in museums and social service agencies. Some things she has done while collecting a paycheque:

  • told people the whereabouts of a long-lost family member,
  • go-go danced in front of 700 people,
  • traipsed across a wind-whipped hospital rooftop with a nun,
  • and lost a frozen beaver head under a parked car.

Robin Riopelle is the author’s birthname. She currently lives on the border between French and English Canada with her criminologist husband, two seemingly delightful children, and an obstreperous spaniel. She is a great supporter of the Oxford comma.

In addition to writing fiction for adults, Riopelle also illustrates children’s books (as Elizabeth Todd Doyle).

Robin Riopelle’s debut novel, Deadroads was released by Night Shade Books this year. You can read an excerpt from excerpt from Deadroads on the author’s website.

Follow Robin Riopelle on Facebook or on Twitter at @Robin_Riopelle.


SF Signal: Thank-you very much for the interview. We’re very grateful to have this chance to speak with you.

Robin Riopelle: You really deserve a medal for waiting so long for my response—and I ought to be walloped upside the head for dicking about. Vacations have a way for whisking one off to irresponsibility-land. Plus, you told me to “take my time” which is, obviously, the WRONG THING TO SAY TO ME.

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Ursula K. Le Guin is one of science fiction’s greats: her stories Left Hand of Darkness, A Wizard of Earthsea and The Dispossessed rank among the genre’s best works, and she moves easily between science fiction and fantasy, writing things that science fiction authors had barely touched before she came onto the scene. To say she was influential is to undersell one’s words.

I have to say, of all of Le Guin’s works that I’ve read, the ones that I’ve enjoyed the most was A Wizard of Earthsea, which I read years ago. Of all the fantasy novels I’ve picked up, it’s probably one of the ones that’s stuck with me the most.

Go read The Left and Right Hands of Ursula K. Le Guin over on Kirkus Reviews.

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This toungue-in-cheek video is a greta way to punk Star Trek noobs…

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Do you like a little humor in your fiction? If so, then read on to see how you can get Peter Ward’s Note to Self for only 99 cents!

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SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-08-15

Interviews & Profiles

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WINNERS: 1939 Retro Hugo Award

The winners of the 1939 Retro Hugo Award were announced at LonCon 3:
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GAME REVIEW: One Finger Death Punch

One Finger Death Punch is a Kung Fu fighting game released by Silver Dollar Games in March 2014 with an extremely simple control scheme. So simple that it only uses two buttons–one to attack left, and one to attack right. If you attack when there’s no enemy within range, then you miss and leave yourself vulnerable to attack. And for the most part that’s all you need to know. The game punishes button-mashing (randomly and rapidly pressing buttons) because missing an attack is the last thing you want to do.

Of course, there are some complications. Enemies sometimes drop weapons. Some give you unlimited range one-kill hits like bow and arrows, throwing knifes and bombs. Others just give you extended range for a limited period of time like swords, clubs, and some sillier ones like fish.
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Most of these columns have focused on trilogies, some on duologies. This installment focuses on the longest book series I’ve coverd so far: five books. However, these books are relatively short compared to some of the previous books I’ve covered here at the Completist. The books I’ll be discussing: Robert Buettner’s five book Military SF series focusing on Jason Wander which begins with Orphanage. This series has a bit of a kink in its publication (which seems to be an undercurrent of this column…). Buettner’s debut (and launch of the series) Orphanage (and the second installment Orphan’s Destiny) were some of the last titles under the WarnerAspect imprint before Orbit took over as the SF imprint of Hachette. Once Orbit replaced WarnerAspect, the series was rebranded a bit with new cover art. But more of that later, on to the books…

This series is set approximately 40 years in the future with Earth being attacked by aliens who come to be known as Slugs. Many of the people chosen for this interstellar war are orphans, people whose families were destroyed in the attacks, which take the form of large stone projectiles, with no nuclear armaments, hurtling through space, which destroy the surrounding area where they land, most often populated cities like Pittsburgh or Indianapolis. It is with this premise Robert Buettner introduces the reader to the world of Orphanage and its protagonist, Jason Wander whose hometown is the destroyed Indianapolis.
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As epic terrors imperil the cosmos, Fred Kiesche, Jeff Patterson, and the newly cyberneticized John E. O. Stevens blaze across the heavens wielding wit, fortitude, and implausibly potent weapons of dubious origin to discuss the Guardians of the Galaxy.

The Hoarsemen share their opinions on the movie (SPOILER ALERT), then turn their attentions to the comics which spawned it. Fred wrestles with the convoluted continuity of Marvel’s cosmic playground, while life-long readers John and Jeff endure the dual threats of retcon and reboot. Why was the first iteration of Jason Quill such a jackass? Will we ever see Mantis on the big screen? And can anyone defeat Taserface!

As usual, the chaotic cosmic conversation concludes with the customary captivating chronicles of Culture Consumed. (Long-time Marvel fans, see what I did there?)

The celestial vastness awaits! Quickly! Before the spacetime continuum is torn asunder!

Running time: 1 hour 10 minutes.

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Editor Peter Young just released issue #3 and #4 of his excellent Big Sky fanzine. Both issues are part of a special project released specifically for Loncon 3. They both shine the light entirely on Gollancz’s excellent SF Masterworks list. These special issues of Big Sky feature reviews and commentary for each title in the Masterworks series, all listed in order of appearance.

Peter contacted me a while back about including three of my own reviews that I’ve published right here at SF Signal (for Ursual K. Le Guin’s The Lathe of Heaven, Robert Silverberg’s The Book of Skulls, and Algys Budrys’ Rogue Moon). Those are included, along with tons of other reviews and articles by folks like Karen Burnham (also and SF Signal contributor!), Farah Mendlesohn, Kate Sherrod, David Langford, Rhys Hughes, Nicholas Whyte, Bruce Gillespie, Christopher J. Garcia, Amy H, Sturgis, Niall Alexander, Rich Horton, Neal Asher, Tim Powers, Cheryl Morgan, Mark Chitty, Alma Alexander, Eric Brown, Scott Lynch, Ross E. Lockhart, Annalee Newitz, Abigail Nussbaum, Mark Yon, Lee Battersby, Ian Sales, Karen Hueler, Jo Walton, Joachim Boaz, and so many others.

Click on through to grab both issues of both issues of Big Sky!

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This looks interesting. Check out the cover and synopsis for the upcoming novel The Genome by Sergei Lukyanenko.
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