Here is the cover and synopsis for the upcoming novel The Warring States by Aidan Harte, the sequel to Irenicon.

Here’s the synopsis:
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SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-09-10

Interviews & Profiles

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We’re pleased to be able to bring to you today an excerpt from Jonathan Wood’s fun new novel, Yesterday’s Hero (out this week from Titan Books)!

Here’s what the book is about:

Another day, another zombie T-Rex to put down. All part of the routine for Arthur Wallace and MI37—the government department devoted to defending Britain from threats magical, supernatural, extraterrestrial, and generally odd. But a zombie T-Rex is only the first of Arthur’s problems, as Russian cyborg wizards threaten his life, and his coworkers threaten his sanity.

Read on for the excerpt!

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I’ve recently finished an in-depth re-read of The Dragonbone Chair, the first book in Tad Williams’ Memory, Sorrow and Thorn trilogy (or tetralogy because when the series was put out in paperback, the third door stopper had to be split in two). I’m re-reading it for two main reasons: Williams has announced a new three book series, placed in the same world, called THE LAST KING OF OSTEN ARD; and though I remember liking it when I read it when it was first released, I cannot remember through the years the details. My Dad used to call this “CRS Syndrome” (Can’t Remember S___).

I’m happy to report that The Dragonbone Chair stands up to the test of time, at least in my re-read of it. Published in 1988. it has an obvious place in the fantasy timeline after Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings (LOTR) published in the mid 50’s, and before George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire (ASOIAF) (known as Game of Thrones by HBO viewers) published from 1996 through hopefully-not-too-many-years-from-now. Like many other fantasy epics of its time, it is influenced by Tolkien. But unlike many published around the same time, it not a Tolkien imitator (though there are some similarities). GRRM cites the series as an influence on his own A Song of Ice and Fire series. (Read Daniel Kaszor’s article in the National Post that talks about Williams’ series as an inspiration for the A Song of Ice and Fire series and as starting the wave of American fantasy; also, if interested, there is an article about a Tad Williams’ hosted book signing of Martin where Martin discussed this series as inspiration.)
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NOTE: This installment of Special Needs In Strange Worlds features a guest post from author Jaym Gates! – Sarah Chorn


Jaym Gates is an editor, author, and communications specialist. She’s edited the anthologies War Stories, Broken Time Blues, and is working on Genius Loci. She is also the Communications Director for the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. She is active in ensuring a safer, more respectful environment in SF. Follow her on Twitter as @JaymGates, or online at JaymGates.com.

My Own Damn Game

by Jaym Gates

My first Dungeons and Dragons game was with four industry veterans. Not just guys who had played for years, but guys who had actually developed the game. Nothing like being thrown in at the deep end.

Fortunately, the two running the game were merciful and gave me a chaos-oriented paladin. Our host had mead and scotch for us to bolster the usual snacks. It turned out to be handier than he’d perhaps planned. The Game Master (GM) began drinking heavily about two minutes into the game because one player wouldn’t stop punning, one had somehow ended up with a cross-dressing rogue, and I was being myself, which is just never good for anyone trying to run a serious game. We romped through the first half of the adventure, puns and lipstick flying, trying with all our might to break the GM.
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Eric Choi has posted the table of contents for the upcoming (December 2, 2014) anthology he co-edited with Ben Bova: Carbide Tipped Pens: Seventeen Tales of Hard Science Fiction.

Here’s the book description:

Seventeen hard science fiction tales by today’s top authors

Hard science fiction is the literature of change, rigorously examining the impact—both beneficial and dangerous—of science and technology on humanity, the future, and the cosmos. As science advances, expanding our knowledge of the universe, astounding new frontiers in storytelling open up as well.

In Carbide Tipped Pens, over a dozen of today’s most creative imaginations explore these frontiers, carrying on the grand tradition of such legendary masters as Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, and John W. Campbell, while bringing hard science fiction into the 21st century by extrapolating from the latest scientific developments and discoveries. Ranging from ancient China to the outer reaches of the solar system, this outstanding collection of original stories, written by an international roster of authors, finds wonder, terror, and gripping human drama in topics as diverse as space exploration, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, climate change, alternate history, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, interplanetary war, and even the future of baseball.

From tattoos that treat allergies to hazardous missions to Mars and beyond, from the end of the world to the farthest limits of human invention, Carbide Tipped Pens turns startling new ideas into state-of-the art science fiction.

Includes stories by Ben Bova, Gregory Benford, Robert Reed, Aliette de Bodard, Jack McDevitt, Howard Hendrix, Daniel H. Wilson, and many others!

Here’s the table of contents…
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Here’s the cover and synopsis for the upcoming novel Sired by Stone, the second book in The Fabrick Weavers series by Andrew Post.

Cover art is by Patrick Reilly.

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Got a hot Free Fiction Tip? Tell me here

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What’s Special About Today’s Free Fiction?

  1. Crossed Genres #21 – September 2014 – Typical
  2. Electric Spec #9.3 – August 31, 2014
  3. Heroic Fantasy Quarterly #21
  4. Mirror Dance Autumn 2014
  5. New Myths #28 – September 2014

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SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-09-09

Interviews & Profiles

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Why You Want to Enter a Writing Contest

MB Partlow is a writer, a cranky optimist, a domestic goddess wannabe, a voracious reader across any genre, and the Director for the Pikes Peak Writers Conference.

Why on Earth (or Any Other Planet) Would You Want to Enter a Writing Contest?

by MB Partlow

If you have a manuscript you’re working on or a finished novel hiding on your hard drive, you might want to expose your brainchild to the world through a writing contest. You could want feedback, fame and/or glory*. Or you could be a masochist.

Step one is to always read the directions carefully. You wouldn’t want to spread your foot-fungus medication on the wrong body part, and you wouldn’t want to submit your manuscript to the wrong contest or in the wrong category. Maximize your results by taking the time to carefully read through what and how to submit. Many contests are open to published or unpublished authors, while others, like the Zebulon, are open to both.

So why enter a writing contest?

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Jonathan Wood is an Englishman in New York. There’s a story in there involving falling in love and flunking out of med school, but in the end it all worked out all right, and, quite frankly, the medical community is far better off without him, so we won’t go into it here. His debut novel, No Hero was described by Publisher’s Weekly as “a funny, dark, rip-roaring adventure with a lot of heart, highly recommended for urban fantasy and light science fiction readers alike.” Barnesandnoble.com listed it has one of the 20 best paranormal fantasies of the past decade, and Charlaine Harris, author of the Sookie Stackhouse novels described it as, “so funny I laughed out loud.” His short fiction has appeared in Weird Tales, Chizine, and Beneath Ceaseless Skies, as well as anthologies such as The Book of Cthulhu 2 and The Best of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Year One.


Haralambi Markov: Hello, Jonathan. Welcome! Thank you so much for taking the time to do this interview. Let’s get right to it. Your sophomore novel – Yesterday’s Hero – is hitting the shelves soon. I’ll pretend I’ve no clue what it’s about. How would you sell it to me in as few words as possible?

Jonathan Wood: A team of misfit secret agents from England attempt to thwart the diabolical plans of a team of time-travelling Russian wizards. Hijinks and a zombie T-Rex ensue. How’s that?

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Nancy Kress is the author of thirty-three books, including twenty-ix novels, four collections of short stories, and three books on writing. Her work has won five Nebulas, two Hugos, a Sturgeon, and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award. Most recent works are After The Fall, Before The Fall, During The Fall (Tachyon, 2012), a novel of apocalypse, and Yesterday’s Kin, about genetic inheritance (Tachyon, 2014). In addition to writing, Kress often teaches at various venues around the country and abroad; in 2008 she was the Picador visiting lecturer at the University of Leipzig. Kress lives in Seattle with her husband, writer Jack Skillingstead, and Cosette, the world’s most spoiled toy poodle.

“DNA Yet Again, Kress?”
or, Why I Write So Much About Genetic Engineering

by Nancy Kress

Every once in a while some critic says, “Science fiction is over. The future is here now. Science has caught up with science fiction and there is nothing left to write about.” To these people I say, “Huh? What are you talking about?”

Science is advancing at a dizzying rate, but that produces more to write about, not less. Bi-weekly, Science News dazzles me with fresh discoveries in all fields. So why do I mostly (not exclusively, but very definitely mostly) choose to write about genetic engineering in my fiction? Three reasons.
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WINNERS: 2014 British Fantasy Awards


The winners of the 2014 British Fantasy Awards were announced on Sunday at FantasyCon 2014 in York:
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Science fiction fandom seldom agrees on anything, but if there’s one thing that unites them it’s that the worst novel ever written is Galaxy 666 by Pel Torro (the pseudonym used by Lionel and Patricia Fanthorpe).
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Coming Soon Enough is the name of Stephen Cass’ new anthology eBook about near-future technologies like drones, wearable computing, implants, 3-D printing, and more. It’s got 6 stories by top-notch authors and it’s only $1.99. And you can read the Nancy Kresss story for free!

Here’s the table of contents and story link…
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Books Received: September 8, 2014

In the interest of full disclosure, here are the books we received this week.
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SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-09-08

Interviews & Profiles

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David Gerrold’s website recently got a makeover to highlight the twelve classic works that have been made available in eBook format.

One of those books is Starhunt and we’re pleased to be able to offer a Starhunt giveaway for SF Signal readers!

Winners will receive an eBook copy of Starhunt *and* a chance to select FOUR additional eBooks from David’s 12 new releases. (The eBooks will be in PDF format.)

Are you not familiar with Starhunt? Here’s what it’s about:

Only an endless space war could have produced the Roger Burlingame. A war that had caused Earth to turn starships into instruments of total destruction. A war that had so drained Earth of resources that the Roger Burlingame was kept in service long after it should have been scrapped.

Now, light years from Earth, the great starship had sighted a quarry almost certain to defeat it in a fair fight. The captain’s nerve was gone; the crew were on the verge of mutiny. And command had passed to a fanatical young first officer hungry for his first kill.

War had turned into hell—and this was a voyage of the damned…

Originally published as Yesterday’s Children.

Find out how to win after the exceprt!
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Book Stack

Mmmmmm…book stack…

Here’s a book meme that focuses on reading habits and buying habits.

You know the drill: Copy the questions below and paste them into the comments with your answers. Answer as many or as few as you’d like.

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Free SF, Fantasy and Horror Fiction for 9/06/2014

Got a hot Free Fiction Tip? Tell me here

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What’s Special About Today’s Free Fiction?

  1. Beneath Ceaseless Skies #155
  2. Lovecraft eZine #32 – August 2014
  3. SQ Mag #16

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