Today is Veterans Day in the US, and to celebrate, Apex Books is offering 40% off the Military Science Fiction anthology War Stories.

To take advantage of this deal, purchase the book through Apex and use the code VETERANSDAY at checkout.

War is everywhere. Not only among the firefights, in the sweat dripping from heavy armor and the clenching grip on your weapon, but also wedging itself deep into families, infiltrating our love letters, hovering in the air above our heads. It’s in our dreams and our text messages. At times it roars with adrenaline. While at others it slips in silently so it can sit beside you until you forget it’s there.

Join Joe Haldeman, Linda Nagata, Karin Lowachee, Ken Liu, Jay Posey, and more as they take you on a tour of the battlefields. From those hurtling through space in spaceships and winding along trails deep in the jungle with bullets whizzing overhead, to the ones hiding behind calm smiles, waiting patiently to reveal itself in those quiet moments when we feel safest. War Stories brings us 23 stories of the impacts of war, showcasing the systems, combat, armor, and aftermath without condemnation or glorification.

Instead, War Stories reveals the truth.

War is what we are.

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Subterranean Press has opened up the pre-order page and revealed the excellent Julie Dillon cover for Mira Grant’s Rolling in the Deep by Mira Grant, coming in April 2015.

Here’s the synopsis:
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SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-11-11

Interviews & Profiles

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REVIEW SUMMARY: Whether you are a Harrison fanatic, a reader of one of his series or just someone who likes history, Harrison’s memoir provides not only insight into his own life, but context of the world that influenced him.

MY RATING:

BRIEF SYNOPSIS: Harry Harrison grows up in the depression, gets drafted for World War II, forms a dislike of the military, learns Esperanto, relocates from NYC to Mexico,  and in his thirties starts writing Science Fiction. From Italy to England to Denmark and several places in between, Harrison’s memoir follows a man bent on writing, unafraid to move to (at the time) far off places to seek a better life for his family. Subtitled “It seemed like a good idea at the time”, the memoir includes several excellent essays in Part II that could not be integrated into the memoir before the writer’s passing.

MY REVIEW:
PROS: History and environment puts writing in context, and Harrison’s memoir provides great context; the essays in Part II are worthy of publication on their own.
CONS: Part I becomes a bit incoherent at the end.
BOTTOM LINE: Though incomplete, this book details the unique life story of one of science fiction’s grand masters, told partially as memoir and partially through targeted essays.

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Jennifer Marie Brissett is a Jamaican-British American who came to the U.S. when she was four and grew up in Cambridge, MA. For three and a half years, she owned and operated the Brooklyn indie bookstore, Indigo Café & Books. She has a Masters’ from the Stonecoast MFA Program in Creative Writing and has published stories in The Future Fire, Morpheus Tales, Warrior Wisewoman 2, and Halfway Down the Stairs. Her work has been short-listed for the 2013 storySouth Million Writers Award. Elysium, her debut novel, will be published by Aqueduct Press in December 2014. She currently lives in NYC. Her website can be found at www.jennbrissett.com.

The Inspiration for the novel ELYSIUM

by Jennifer Marie Brissett

As I worked on the first few chapters of Elysium—not knowing exactly where I was going except that I had a seed idea of gender swapping—my grad school mentor suggested that I consider using a theme. I thought about that for a little bit and then it came to me, I mean the whole book came to me, not word for word or even chapter for chapter, but the story and even the structure of the book all flowed from the theme that appeared in my mind: the story of the Roman Emperor Hadrian and his lover Antinous.
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In episode 267 of the SF Signal Podcast Patrick Hester is LIVE from MileHiCon 46 in the Denver Tech Center talking about Doctor Who with Jason Batt, Karen Bjorn, Eytan Kollin and Ian Brazee Cannon.

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WINNERS: 2014 World Fantasy Awards

The winners of the 2014 World Fantasy Awards have been announced!

  • LIFE ACHIEVEMENT WINNERS
    • Ellen Datlow
    • Chelsea Quinn Yarbro
  • NOVEL: Sofia Samatar, A Stranger in Olondria (Small Beer Press)
  • NOVELLA: Andy Duncan & Ellen Klages “Wakulla Springs” (Tor.com, 10/13)
  • SHORT STORY: Caitlín R. Kiernan, “The Prayer of Ninety Cats” (Subterranean magazine, Spring 2013)
  • ANTHOLOGY: George R.R. Martin and Gardner Dozois, eds. Dangerous Women (Tor Books/Voyager UK)
  • COLLECTION: Caitlín R. Kiernan, The Ape’s Wife and Other Stories (Subterranean Press)
  • ARTIST: Charles Vess
  • SPECIAL AWARD—PROFESSIONAL:
    • Irene Gallo, for art direction of Tor.com
    • William K. Schafer, for Subterranean Press
  • SPECIAL AWARD—NON-PROFESSIONAL: Kate Baker, Neil Clarke & Sean Wallace, for Clarkesworld

Congratulations to the winners!

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Ready for some new trailers? I knew you were!
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Table of Contents: Interzone #255

Here are the contents for the new issue of Interzone, featuring cover art by Wayne Haag:
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PLUG is an interesting and well done short film by art director David Levy, whose credits include Tron Legacy, Prometheus, Ender’s Game, Tomorrow Land, and Avatar 2.

PLUG takes place on a post-apocalyptic Earth, where Leila Dawn (played by Natalie Floyd) is the only human survivor. She was raised by Robots after humanity abandoned the planet when it was destroyed via nuclear warfare. Leila cannot forget her parents nor ignore her desire to find other organic life. She sets out on a hunt with a Military Unit named Marker (Lex Cassar) only to discover the reality she’s been denied — a reality that sparks her ultimate quest.

PLUG is the first installment of Levy’s yet-to-be-produced epic series/feature, which follows Leila on her quest to reunite with humanity and the impossible choices she must make about her allegiances – Human or Robot. I look forward to seeing more.

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Table of Contents: Black Static #43

Here are the contents of the new issue of Black Static, which features cover art by Ben Baldwin…
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Books Received: November 10, 2014

In the interest of full disclosure, here are the books we received this week.
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SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-11-10

Interviews & Profiles

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During the Second World War, an English paratrooper crash-lands in a forest leaving him wounded. He meets a creature that tries its best to help him. However, the ordeal is just beginning…

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TRAILER: Doctor Who 2014 Christmas Special

The holidays are approaching…and that can only mean one thing! Well, actually, it means several things, but one of the most enjoyable is the annual Doctor Who Christmas Special.

Here’s a trailer for this year’s special…

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FILM REVIEW: Interstellar

REVIEW SYNOPSIS: While gorgeously shot, Christopher Nolan’s bid for entry into the canon of artistic science fiction movies drips with cliché and plods through its galactic vistas with little that is new or interesting.

MY REVIEW:

SYNOPSIS: A former-NASA-test-pilot-turned-farmer is recruited to pilot an interstellar spaceship in the hopes of helping humanity escape from an earth ravaged by environmental degradation.

MY REVIEW:
PROS: Incredible outer space sequences; alien worlds vividly realized; amazing renderings of a wormhole and a black hole.
CONS: Clichéd, sentimental characters; unconvincing future.

Matthew McConaughey is out to save the world, a line this critic never thought he would write without guffawing himself into a catatonic state. Perhaps I would not laugh if he were doing so in a television adaptation of Mike Judge’s Idiocracy, where his meager talents might actually serve the material, but in a movie as ambitious as Interstellar, with director Christopher Nolan vying for space among such great science fiction movies as Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey and Andrei Tarkovsky’s Solaris (and, perhaps, Terence Malick’s The Tree of Life), the idea of this dazed and confused Texas good-old-boy as Campbellian Competent Man offers too much cognitive dissonance, and certainly requires vast suspension of disbelief, to keep the titters away.
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The Slow Unveiling of James Tiptree Jr.

Science Fiction publishing is full of strange characters, but there’s one story that seems to really capture people’s attention consistently: James Tiptree Jr., a brilliant figure who seemed to appear out of nowhere, earn a number of awards, and maintained a fairly elusive personality in science fiction circles. It wasn’t until a decade of writing that it was revealed that Tiptree wasn’t actually a guy: it was a woman named Alice Sheldon, with an utterly fascinating background: she had traveled the world, participated in the Second World War, worked for the CIA and had a PhD.

Sheldon proves to be an interesting figure, challenging a number of preconceptions for gender in science fiction (not just with her alter ego). What’s interesting about Sheldon is that she endured and wrote about a number of the same issues that we seem to face in science fiction right now: how are women represented in fiction and how are female authors treated differently than their male counterparts? Sheldon’s story is illuminating when it comes to this.

Go read The Slow Unveiling of James Tiptree Jr. over on the Kirkus Reviews Blog.

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What’s Special About Today’s Free Fiction?

  1. A little late on my part, but: Fantasy Scroll Magazine #3 – September 2014

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SF/F/H Link Post for 2014-11-08

Interviews & Profiles

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